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Media Contact: Wendy Sefsaf at 202-507-7524 or

Press Releases

11/12/15 | Council Statement of CBP's Body-Camera Policy Announcement

Washington D.C. – Ben Johnson, Executive Director of the American Immigration Council, responded to the announcement that Customs and Border Protection (CBP) staff will expand the agency’s camera review with the following statement:

"Today's decision to not broadly implement body-worn cameras is a significant step backwards for CBP. For an agency that has significant problems with transparency and accountability, the excuses provided to not move forward in a bold and comprehensive way will only deepen that perception. CBP is the largest law enforcement agency in the country, and it seems they are out of step with other agencies that are moving forward to implement body cameras in an effort to protect both officers and those they serve.

“The first phases of CBP’s assessment of cameras were focused on body-worn cameras and had clear start and end dates. Today’s announcement has no timeline for moving forward, and it attempts to shift the focus away from body-worn cameras to looking at “mobile,” “fixed,” and “maritime cameras” along with body-worn cameras. This appears to be nothing more than an attempt by Customs and Border Protection to run down the clock on this administration and pass the buck.”

To view other resources on publications related to CBP policies and activities see:

10/20/15 | Time for Congress to Go Back to Bi-Partisan Comprehensive Solutions to Immigration

Washington D.C. - Today, the Senate rejected the motion to proceed on Senator David Vitter’s (R-LA) “Stop Sanctuary Policies and Protect Americans Act” (S. 2146). This bill is an enforcement-only approach to immigration and would punish cities and states that adopt community policing policies that work to make communities safer and increase communication between police and their residents. The procedural vote required 60 Yea votes to begin debate on the bill; the motion failed 54-45. 

The following is a statement by Benjamin Johnson, Executive Director of the American Immigration Council:

"The Senate vote is a rejection of another flawed piece of legislation that was overwhelming opposed by faith, law enforcement and immigrant advocates around the country. It stands in stark contrast to the last piece of immigration legislation passed in June 2013, which followed a model of bipartisanship and that understood and addressed the need for comprehensive solutions to our outdated immigration system. 

Clearly the components for success require that efforts be bipartisan and comprehensive. It’s time for Congress to end its politically-motivated and failed attempts at enforcement-only legislation and get back to work on passing meaningful reform that can, in fact, fix our outdated immigration system."


For press inquiries, contact Wendy Feliz at or 202-507-752

10/05/15 | Just-Released Customs and Border Protection Standards Still Lack Accountability

Washington, D.C. — Today, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) released its long-awaited, new National Standards on Transport, Escort, Detention and Search (TEDS), which govern the transfer of individuals in CBP custody, procedures for handling such individuals’ belongings, conditions in CBP detention facilities, and personal searches. 


IPC in the News

In an interview with Fox News host Sean Hannity on Donald Trump's immigration platform, Univison anchor Jorge Ramos cited data from the American Immigration Council's report "The Criminalization of Immigration in the United States" which notes that immigrants are less likely to commit crimes than the native-born population.

Watch the exchange below:

Examiner | 08/17/15

CNN cited the American Immigration Council's recent report The Criminalization of Immigration in the United States and by quoting Senior Researcher Walter Ewing in "Immigrants and crime: Crunching the numbers":

"'Government statistics on who is being removed from the country can be somewhat deceptive,' says Walter Ewing, a senior researcher for the American Immigration Council who helped author a report released this week that argues immigrants are less likely to be criminals than native-born U.S. citizens."

The article went on to point out figures from the Council’s recent report which dispells anti-immigrant rhetoric through facts, noting:

…the percentage of foreign-born men in the United States who are incarcerated (1.6%) is less than the percentage of U.S.-born men who are imprisoned (3.3%). And the reason they're behind bars is often tied to immigration offenses.”

CNN | 07/08/15

Highlighting data from the American Immigration Council's report "Executive Grants of Temporary Immigration Relief, 1956-Present" NBC News Latino covered the historical precedent of executive action on immigration in the article "Report: Since Eisenhower, Executive Action Used for Immigration":

When President Barack Obama takes executive action to make immigration reforms, he will be following the lead of several other presidents, an immigration group said in a recently released report.

The report by the American Immigration Council states that every U.S. president since at least 1956 has granted temporary immigration relief of some form.

NBC News | 10/06/14