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Revised Definition of 'Anchor Baby' Part of Leftist Agenda, Critics Say

Published on Thu, Dec 08, 2011

A decision by the American Heritage Dictionary to revise its definition of "anchor baby" -- labeling it an offensive and disparaging term -- is an attempt to manipulate the "linguistic landscape" and push a leftist agenda, some opponents of illegal immigration say.

"Anchor baby" was among roughly 10,000 words -- including "hoodie" and "babydaddy" -- added to the dictionary's fifth edition last month. The hot-button term, a noun, was initially defined as: "A child born to a noncitizen mother in a country that grants automatic citizenship to children born on its soil, especially such a child born to parents seeking to secure eventual citizenship for themselves and often other members of their family."

That definition caught the attention of Mary Giovagnoli, director of the Washington-based Immigration Policy Center, who heard American Heritage Dictionary executive editor Steve Kleinedler read it during a radio interview last month. Giovagnoli blasted the definition on the organization's blog last Friday, saying it masked the "poisonous and derogatory" nature of the term.

By Monday, the term had been changed. It is now defined as such: "Offensive  Used as a disparaging term for a child born to a noncitizen mother in a country that grants automatic citizenship to children born on its soil, especially when the child's birthplace is thought to have been chosen in order to improve the mother's or other relatives' chances of securing eventual citizenship."

The revision is now a "well-crafted" definition of how the term is used, Giovagnoli said.

But not everyone agrees.

"That's a political statement and it's not even accurate," said Mark Krikorian, executive director of the Center for Immigration Studies. "[An anchor baby] is a child born to an illegal immigrant."

Krikorian said the revised definition makes a political statement and is much more than neutral, "just the facts" reference material.Read more...

Published in the Fox News

Get Involved

Click on the links below to explore ways that you can involved yourself in the Council's community activities!

Immigrant Youth Achievement Award

Annual Creative Writing Contest

Annual Multimedia Contest

Donate

The American Immigration Council is always looking for volunteers and contest coordinators; we are always open to suggestions! Please email info@immcouncil.org for more information.

The American Immigration Council can be reached at:

1331 G Street, NW
Suite 200
Washington, DC 20005

phone: 202-507-7500
fax: 202-742-5619

Quick Fact: Immigrants found large percentage of science and technology firms

Immigrant entrepreneurs have founded or co-founded 25.3% of all science and technology firms in the United States.

To halt cartels, block cash flow

Published on Thu, Feb 09, 2012

 

If you want to stop a monster, cut off its head. Simple logic.

If you want a secure the border, go after the crime syndicates that routinely penetrate our southern border for their own nefarious purposes. Go after the leaders of the Mexican cartels. Go after their money.

The minions of these sophisticated international criminal organizations smuggle in drugs and people at will. They take back tens of billions of dollars in dirty profits. We put manpower and technology on the border. They find ways around it.

They take their profits out in shrink-wrapped bundles of hundred-dollar bills. Electronic transfers. Money schemes. Prepaid value cards that can store and transport money.

Joaquin "Chapo" Guzman, leader of the Sinaloa cartel, regularly appears on Forbes list of the world's wealthiest people.

"If U.S. forces can find Osama bin Laden, I am sure, with Mexican help, they can find and arrest Chapo," former Arizona Attorney General Terry Goddard wrote in an article for the Immigration Policy Center. "That arrest would do more to stop the flow of contraband into the U.S. and the slaughter in Mexico than all the billions spent so far."

Through the Merida Initiative, the U.S. has provided money and expertise to Mexico to fight the cartels, but time is not on our side if we hope to engage in a more vigorous assault on these criminal gangs that breach our borders. Mexican President Felipe Calderon, who runs an aggressive campaign against the cartels, will leave office in December. He cannot run in Mexico's July presidential election. His successor may take a more conciliatory approach to the cartels. Mexico is weary of a drug war that has cost more than 47,000 lives in the past five years.

Instead of discussing the cartel threat, the U.S. has been focusing on fences, immigration sweeps and deportations. These are politically popular responses that do not weaken criminal organizations in Mexico.Read more...

Published in the The Arizona Republic

FAQs

THE FAQs ARE DIVIDED INTO THE FOLLOWING SECTIONS:

Prospective Applicant FAQs:

1. What occupational categories can the American Immigration Council sponsor?
The American Immigration Council is designated by the U.S. Department of State to sponsor J-1 intern and trainee programs in the following occupational areas:

• Arts and Culture
• Information Media and Communications
• Management, Business, Commerce and Finance
• Public Administration and Law
• Social Sciences, Library Science, Non-clinical Counseling, Social Services
• The Sciences, Engineering, Architecture, Mathematics and Industrial Occupations
• Tourism

2. How long can the internship or training program be?
Intern programs have a maximum duration of 12 months. Trainee programs have a maximum duration of 18 months.

3. What are the minimum qualifications for an international intern?
Potential J-1 interns must be able to document and/or demonstrate the following to meet basic eligibility requirements:

• Sufficient English language fluency (to be determined by American Immigration Council staff)
• Current enrollment at a post-secondary, degree-granting academic program outside of the United States or
• Graduation within the past 12 months from such post-secondary academic program outside of the United States

4. What are the minimum qualifications for an international trainee?
Potential J-1 trainees must be able to document and/or demonstrate the following to meet basic eligibility requirements:Read more...

Most ‘illegals' are are here to stay

Published on Mon, Apr 30, 2012

We are not sure how it would help the United States to see the exodus of millions of taxpayers with homes, cars, children and jobs. Yet, the hope for a mass exodus of people who fit that description is part of what inspired new immigration-enforcement laws in Arizona, Utah, Oklahoma, Georgia, South Carolina and Alabama.

Best estimates say that roughly 11 million residents of the United States live here illegally. Some came here by getting away with misdemeanor border crossings. Others overstayed visas. Regardless, illegal residency is not a crime. It is a non-criminal, civil dispute with government.

Read more...

Published in the Colorado Springs Gazette

Systemic Reforms

Systemic ReformsThe LAC has a strong track record of litigating to fix long-standing problems with our broken immigration system. Through our class action and other litigation, we have convinced the courts of appeals to overturn government policies that prevented an entire class of noncitizens from applying for lawful residency; that precluded individuals from presenting evidence to immigration judges in deportation cases; and that delayed for years permanent resident status for thousands of individuals who had been granted asylum. The LAC coordinates its litigation with immigration advocates nationwide and facilitates strategic planning and collaboration among immigration litigators.Read more...

Minnesota's Latino students weigh chance to study, work without deportation fears

Published on Mon, Aug 13, 2012

Twin Cities Pioneer Press article, "Minnesota's Latino students weigh chance to study, work without deportation fears," cites IPC's study (Who and Where the DREAMers Are), which states that more than 9,000 immigrants living in Minnesota could benefit from President Obama's deferred action: Read more...

Published in the Twin Cities Pioneer Press

Past Honorees

Each year, the American Immigration Council honors American immigrants and their achievements. Our distinguished honorees have come from politics, music, television, sports, education and many other professional fields. Click on each name to learn more about each honoree.

We congratulate our 2014 Honorees:

American Heritage Awards

 joseantoniovargas   Nachito Herrera   T.Emmanuel
   Carlos Arredondo
 Rais Bhuiyan
 Mary Mazzio

 

Immigrant Achievement AwardsRead more...