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Delaware: Immigrant Entrepreneurs, Innovation, and Welcoming Initiatives in the First State

In Delaware, there is no doubt that immigrant entrepreneurs and innovators play an important role. Immigrant entrepreneurs bring in additional revenue, create jobs, and contribute to the state’s economy. Highly skilled immigrants are vital to the state’s innovation industries and to the metropolitan areas within the state, helping to boost local economies. Furthermore, local government, business, and non-profit leaders recognize the importance of immigrants in their communities and support immigration through local “welcoming” and integration initiatives.

Immigrant entrepreneurs contribute to Delaware’s economy.

  • From 2006 to 2010, there were 3,320 new immigrant business owners in Delaware and in 2010, 10.5 percent of all business owners in Delaware were foreign-born.
  • In 2010, new immigrant business owners had a total net business income of $261 million, which is 12.6 percent of all net business income in the state.
  • Delaware is home to many successful companies with at least one founder who was an immigrant or child of an immigrant, including well-known companies such as the chemical giant DuPont, which brought in $39.5 billion in revenue in 2012 and employs 70,000 people worldwide.

Highly skilled immigrants are vital to Delaware’s innovation industries, which in turn helps lead American innovation and creates jobs.Read more...

Published On:

14th Amendment causes GOP split

Published on Mon, Aug 09, 2010

Mary Giovagnoli, director of the Immigration Policy Center, said the timing of his announcement and his harsh choice of words – “They come here to drop a child. It’s called drop and leave” -- indicated Graham was simply trying to rile up his conservative base in the midst of the red-hot immigration debate.

Giovagnoli, whose group backs comprehensive immigration reform, said “it really is a politically manufactured issue.”

Published in the Politico

ICE's Detention after Removal Hearing Program (DARH)

This Practice Advisory provides suggestions for lawyers with clients subject to the ICE’s Detention After Removal Hearing Program (DARH), outlines statutes and regulations governing the detention of respondents subject to DARH, and sets out potential legal challenges.

Published On: Friday, April 9, 2004 | Download File

Immigration Benefits and Pitfalls for LGBT Families in a Post-DOMA World

In United States v. Windsor, the Supreme Court held that Section 3 of the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) is unconstitutional.  With the end of DOMA, married LGBT binational couples can access the panoply of marriage-based immigration benefits and forms of relief from removal.  This practice advisory provides an overview of the agencies’ initial responses to Windsor and highlights some of the issues LGBT families will face in a post-DOMA world. It also includes information about the guidance USCIS issued on Friday, July 26.

Published On: Monday, August 5, 2013 | Download File

Heritage Boxes

Creating Heritage Boxes will allow students to obtain a cross-curricular knowledge using relevant literature and information obtained through family member interviews. Students will understand the value of becoming familiar with their heritage and culture through the research of an ancestor. (NOTE: This is a project-based learning activity that requires several months and the support of families and the school community to implement. The interconnected activities will foster an overall understanding and appreciation for the diversity in your school and our nation.)

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Faith-Based Groups Differ in Approach to Immigration Reform

Published on Sun, Nov 07, 2010

According to the Immigration Policy Center the U.S. employment-based immigration rules are not in line with U.S. labor needs. Only 5,000 green cards per year are given to less skilled workers such as landscapers, hotel staff, and construction workers. This inadequate number of available green cards is “the crux of the unauthorized immigration problem in the U.S.,” according to an October 2010 Fact Sheet by the center.

Published in the Epoch Times

Prosecutorial Discretion

Prosecutorial discretion is the authority of a law enforcement agency or officer to decide whether to enforce the law in a particular case. In the immigration context, favorable exercises of prosecutorial discretion include grants of deferred action, stays of removal, and decisions to cancel or not issue a Notice to Appear (NTA). Since 2000, the legacy Immigration and Naturalization Service and current DHS agencies have issued more than a dozen guidance memoranda addressing prosecutorial discretion. The LAC has issued a practice advisory suggesting ways that immigration attorneys can influence the favorable exercise of prosecutorial discretion by DHS, and filed an amicus brief relating to the exercise of prosecutorial discretion in a Ninth Circuit case.

Tell about your cases. We encourage attorneys who have requested favorable exercises of prosecutorial discretion to submit reports of their experiences by completing this survey.

CASES | ADVOCACY | RESOURCES

CASES

Vega Alvarez v. Holder, No. 08-71383 (9th Cir. amicus brief filed Feb. 25, 2011). The court requested that the parties submit supplemental briefs on the impact of the Morton Memo on civil immigration enforcement priorities on the continued prosecution of removal proceedings against the petitioners.Read more...

Department of Homeland Security

The Yearbook of Immigration Statistics is a compendium of tables that provides data on foreign nationals who, during a fiscal year, were granted lawful permanent residence (i.e., admitted as immigrants or became legal permanent residents), were admitted into the United States on a temporary basis (e.g., tourists, students, or workers), applied for asylum or refugee status, or were naturalized. The Yearbook also presents data on immigration law enforcement actions, including alien apprehensions, removals, and prosecutions.

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Editorial: Overreaching on immigration by making bus drivers criminals

Published on Wed, Jan 26, 2011

While the loss of Head Start would be devastating, it would be far from the only loss the Bluegrass State would suffer if SB 6 became law. The American Immigration Center's Immigration Policy Center recently projected that passage of this bill would cost Kentucky $1.7 billion in economic activity and more than 12,000 jobs.

Published in the Lexington Herald Leader

Litigation Clearinghouse Newsletter Vol. 3, No. 11

This issue covers the impact of the Ninth Circuit decision vacating Orozco v. Mukasey; a Second Circuit affirmance of a BIA ruling finding a post-9/11 Special Call-In Registration Program valid; a Ninth Circuit decision upholding the Arizona employer sanctions law; and the Supreme Court's decision to grant certiorari to determine what federal prosecutors must show to prove aggravated identity theft.

Published On: Wednesday, October 22, 2008 | Download File