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Leadership Roster

 

American Immigration Council

2014-2015 Leadership Roster


Robert Cohen , Chair

 Porter Wright

Rob's primary area of practice is immigration and nationality law. He has extensive experience in all aspects of business and family immigration procedures. In addition to his legal experience, he is also an instructor for the Legal Assistant program at Capital University. Rob was recently appointed to serve as Vice Chair of the American Immigration Council and served as Chapter Chair of the Ohio Chapter of the American Immigration Lawyers Association from 2003 to 2005. He has been listed in The Best Lawyers in America® in the area of Immigration Law every year since 1995, and is recognized by Ohio Super Lawyers®.

Professional Associations

  • American Immigration Lawyers Association
  • Columbus Bar Association
  • Ohio State Bar Association
  • American Bar Association

Education

  • J.D., University of Cincinnati College of Law, 1976
  • A.B., Miami University, 1973

Website: Click Here


Lori Chesser, Vice Chair
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Immigrant Integration: How Foreign-Born Workers Compare To U.S. Citizens (INFOGRAPHIC)

Published on Tue, Aug 28, 2012

An article in the Huffington Post yesterday cited IPC statistics in an article about immigrant integration.  Check out the interesting graphic by the National Immigrant Integration Conference at the bottom of the article: Read more...

Published in the The Huffington Post

Mr. Moreno Carrasco

The ninth of eleven children, Moreno E. Carrasco was born in the Dominican Republic. When he was five years old, his father passed away leaving his mom to care for him and ten other children.

In 1978, he came to the United States with the intention of staying permanently. However, after learning English for one year, Moreno returned home to go to college because his mother was afraid he would get "corrupted" in the United States. He missed the U.S. dearly and returned after the first semester. His first intentions were to go to California to become an eneologist (wine producer). However, he started to tutor foreign students in English and developed a love for education. His French advisor suggested that he obtain his teaching certification, in case the "wine "thing didn't work out. He graduated in 1983 from The University of Maryland at College Park with a degree in French and Spanish Education. That summer he had the opportunity to attend summer classes at La Sorbonne in Paris. In 1984, Moreno started teaching in the Howard County Public Schools system. He became an assistant principal in 1992, and 1996, he joined the Montgomery County Public Schools system as principal at Eastern Middle School. Later in 2003, he would become principal of Richard Montgomery High School. Under his leadership, Robert Montgomery High School has been ranked as the number one school in the State of Maryland and as high as number 11 in the United States.

In 1988, he received a Master's degree in Supervision and Public Administration and has been serving as an adjunct professor of Diversity and Education at Johns Hopkins University since 1994.Read more...

IPC Report Featured on Huffington Post

Published on Thu, Jun 06, 2013

An article in the Huffington Post highlighted a recent special report done by Cecilia Menjivar and Olivia Salcido in cooperation with the Immigration Policy Center.  The report, titled "Gendered Paths to Legal Status:  The Case of Latin American Immigrants in Phoenix, Arizona," focused on inequalities within U.S. immigration law over how men and women are treated. The article said:

"Gender inequalities seep through immigration law in the United States, making women go through a different experience than men when attempting to gain a legal status in the U.S., a new study reveals.

"'Immigration law, which on its face appears gender neutral, actually contains gender biases that create barriers for many women trying to gain legalization within the current immigration system,' stated the authors of a study released last week by the Immigration Policy Center."

Published in the Huffington Post

Roxanne Lynn Doty

Roxanne Lynn Doty joined the ASU faculty in 1990. She received her BA and MA for Arizona State University and Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota. Professor Doty has contributed articles to International Studies Quarterly, Review of International Studies, European Journal of International Relations, Security Studies, Alternatives, Cambridge Review of International Affairs, Millennium‐Journal of International Studies, and International Political Sociology. She is the recipient of a Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation grant 1997‐1998. Her current research interests include international relations theory, border studies, and the politics of writing.

Ben Johnson Featured in the State Journal Register

Published on Sun, Oct 27, 2013

The AIC's Executive Director, Ben Johnson, was recently featured in an op-ed piece in the Illinois newspaper, the State Journal-Register.  The piece focused on what the cost of congressional inaction on immigration reform would be for the state of Illinois.  It was based off of a recent fact sheet released by the IPC titled, "The Cost of Doing Nothing:  Dollars, Lives, and Opportunities Lost in the Wait for Immigration Reform."

In the piece, Johnson writes:

"Immigrants make up 14 percent of Illinois’ population, and 20.3 percent of all business owners in Illinois are foreign-born. The state has everything to gain from a smoothly functioning immigration system and much to lose from a system that is not in tune with current economic and social realities.

"Yet, two-and-a-half months after the Senate passed immigration reform legislation (S. 744), the House of Representatives continues to dawdle. Other than giving speeches and mulling over a few backward-looking, enforcement-only bills, the House has done nothing to revamp the broken U.S. immigration system or put forward any vision of what to do with the 11 million unauthorized immigrants now living in the United States — 525,000 of whom call Illinois home."

Published in the State Journal-Register

David Shirk, Ph.D.

Dr. David Shirk received his Ph.D. in Political Science at the University of California, San Diego, and joined the Political Science Department at the University of San Diego in 2003. He serves as the Director of the Trans‐Border Institute and conducts research and publishes on topics related to Mexican politics, U.S.‐Mexican relations, and law enforcement and security issues along the U.S.‐Mexican border. Dr. Shirk is the Principal Investigator for TBI's Justice in Mexico Project, a bi‐national research initiative focused on criminal justice and the rule of law in Mexico that is sponsored by the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation and the Tinker Foundation. He has been a fellow at the Center for U.S.‐Mexican Studies (1998‐99; 2002‐04) and at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars (2009‐10). 

 

AP Highlights Executive Actions Taken by Reagan and Bush Sr. on Immigration

Published on Sat, Nov 15, 2014

Citing a report by the American Immigration Council detailing 36 examples of executive actons taken on immigration by every president since 1956, the Associated Press highlighted executive actions taken by Presidents Ronald Reagan and George H.W. Bush to shield immigrants from deportation.

Mark Noferi, Enforcement Fellow at the American Immigration Council, was also quoted in the article on the similarities between President Obama's possible executive order on immigration:

"It's a striking parallel," said Mark Noferi of the pro-immigration American Immigration Council. "Bush Sr. went big at the time. He protected about 40 percent of the unauthorized population. Back then that was up to 1.5 million. Today that would be about 5 million."

Published in the Associated Press

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Immigration Two-Step in the Stimulus Bill

Released on Thu, Feb 12, 2009

The House-Senate conferees who crafted the final version of the economic stimulus legislation faced considerable pressure to include immigration-related measures that are long on rhetoric and short on results. Read the Immigration Policy Center's statement on the final provisions in the bill.

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