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The J-1 is a “feel-good” visa that we can all be proud to offer, and the J-1 experience is about more than practical training.


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Kris Kobach: Immigration bills likelier to pass

Published on Fri, Oct 14, 2011

LAWRENCE — Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach said Thursday that bills targeting people living in the United States illegally may be more likely to pass this year because of the pressure conservative candidates are applying on moderate state senators.

That includes, he said, a possible repeal of in-state tuition for the children of illegal immigrants.

Kobach, one of the nation's most prominent advocates for tougher immigration laws, shared his opinion after a wide-ranging discussion of the impact of illegal immigration at the State of the State Kansas Economic Policy Conference on the campus of the University of Kansas.

Kobach defended the controversial laws he co-authored for Arizona and Alabama that, among other things, require law enforcement officers to check immigration status when they've stopped someone on suspicion of any other crime and are suspicious the person is here illegally.

Alabama's law allows police to detain people without bond who can't prove their residency, and it also requires schools to check residency status when kids register. Since key parts of the law were upheld by a federal judge in late September, illegal immigrants have been fleeing the state and schools have reported higher absentee rates.

Kobach acknowledged that such an exodus was an intended outcome of the law he helped write for Alabama. It may decrease population, but it has opened jobs for legal residents.

His views were fiercely challenged.

Benjamin E. Johnson, executive director of the nonprofit American Immigration Council in Washington, D.C., said those laws undercut increasingly successful community policy efforts, use up time that officers could spend on more important matters, and lead to discrimination.

The laws specifically prohibit racial profiling.Read more...

Published in the The Wichita Eagle

International Exchange Center Programs

INTERNS AND TRAINEES

International Exchange Interns

Are you a University student or recent graduate interested in a J-1 intern program related to your studies?  If you have identified a host company, the International Exchange Center can assist in making your internship a reality. Read more...

Quick Fact: Unauthorized immigrants pay taxes

At last count, households headed by unauthorized immigrants paid $11.2 billion in state and local taxes.

 

New stats released on political, economic role of Ariz. immigrants

Published on Fri, Jan 13, 2012

On Thursday, the research and data-gathering Immigration Policy Center released an extensive report detailing the vast contributions of immigrants to the U.S. The enlightening report titled “Strength in Diversity” breaks down by each state the information gathered and also makes important nationwide conclusions.

Nationally, the IPC estimates that 12.5 percent of U.S.-Americans are immigrants, rising steadily from 7.9 percent in 1990. In total, there are over 40 million immigrants in the U.S. today. Former Mexicans make up the largest segment of this country’s immigrant population at nearly 30 percent. The vast majority of U.S. immigrants are authorized residents, with just 28 percent undocumented. And the report estimates that at least 4.5 million native born U.S. citizen minors in this country have at least one undocumented parent. 

In addition, the statistics gathered by the IPC demonstrate the tremendous economic and political contributions made by immigrants to this country. Ten percent of all registered voters in the U.S. are naturalized immigrants or the U.S. citizen children of immigrants. More than 15 percent of all U.S. workers are foreign born, including 40 percent of our nation’s farming, fishing and forestry work force. And households headed by undocumented immigrants annually pay $11.2 billion in state and federal taxes. The IPC concludes that if the nation’s undocumented population were to be completely expelled, the U.S. would lose $551.6 billion in economic activity, $245 billion in gross domestic product and 2.8 million jobs.

In Arizona, specifically, the IPC estimates that 13.4 percent of the state’s population or 856,663 state residents are immigrants. This is up from 7.6 percent in 1990.Read more...

Published in the Tucson Examiner

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FEES

Mandatory Fees for All Applicants:
Individual Trainee or Intern Program Fee: $1450
Application Review Fee (non-refundable): $450
SEVIS Fee:* $180
Sickness and Accident Insurance (optional): $57/month per person
Additional Fees (if applicable):
Dependent Fee (flat fee for all J-2 dependents): $400
Host Site Verification Fee:** $500 ($250 refundable if the application is not accepted)
Program Extension Fee: $300
Replacement DS-2019 (if original is lost or destroyed): $50


* SEVIS Fee: All J-1 program participants are subject to the Student and Exchange Visitor Information System (SEVIS) fee. Proof of SEVIS fee payment must be submitted to U.S. consular officers during the J-1 visa consular processing. To facilitate this process, the International Exchange Center collects this fee and submits it to the U.S. Government on behalf of the exchange visitor. Accepted participants will receive a receipt. To learn more, please visit the SEVIS website.

** Host Site Verification Fee: Federal J-1 program regulations require a visit by an American Immigration Council representative to prospective host companies with fewer than 25 employees or less than $3 million in annual revenuel.

NOTE: All applications will be reviewed within five (5) business days. We no longer offer expedited service.

REFUND POLICYRead more...

"Undocumented and Unafraid"

Published on Thu, Mar 29, 2012

On March 14, Tania Chairez and Jessica Hyejin Lee walked into the Immigration and Customs Enforcement offices in downtown Philadelphia and handed over letters demanding the release of Miguel Orellana, an undocumented immigrant who has been detained for eight months at a Pennsylvania detention center. Both Chairez, a 19-year-old sophomore at the University of Pennsylvania, and Lee, a 20-year-old junior at Bryn Mawr College, were undocumented immigrants themselves, having been brought to the U.S. by their parents at ages 5 and 12, respectively. After making their demand, they exited the building, sat down in the middle of the street, and began shouting “Undocumented! Unafraid!” They were arrested after refusing to move, putting themselves at risk of deportation in the process.

With Washington unlikely to take up immigration reform any time soon, some immigrants, like activists in the Occupy and LGBT movements, are turning to more confrontational tactics. Young undocumented immigrants across the country have come out as “undocumented and unafraid” in the most conspicuous of places: in front of the Alabama Capitol; in Maricopa County, Ariz., home of Sheriff Joe Arpaio; in front of federal immigration courts; and even inside ICE offices, processing centers, and detention centers. While they sometimes have specific causes, such as Orellana’s release, they also had a larger demand: that the civil and human rights of all undocumented immigrants be recognized and respected.Read more...

Published in the Salon.com

Tribute Donations

Remember those people who are or who have influenced your life by paying tribute to them.  A tribute donation to the American Immigration Council provides a meaningful way to remember or recognize those who have made a significant impact on you, your family or your colleagues.

A tribute donation can be made in honor or in memory of someone.  For each tribute, we will notify the honored individual or family of your special gift, keeping the amount confidential. 

You can make a tribute donation online (be sure to fill out “In Honor or In Memory” portion of the form and complete the dedication information) or by completing this form and mailing it to:

 

 American Immigration Council
c/o Megan Hess
1333 G Street, NW
Suite 200
Washington, DC  20005

 

Or you may fax the form to the attention of Megan Hess at (202) 742-5619.

If you have any questions at all regarding giving a contribution to the American Immigration Council, please contact Megan Hess at (202)507-7517 or mhess@immcouncil.org.

The Fiscal Fallout of State Immigration Laws

Published on Thu, Jun 14, 2012

Time Magazine uses IPC numbers to explain why harsh state immigration laws are bad for the economy: Read more...

Published in the Time Magazine