Skip to Content

Programs:

Legalization

Deportation Fears Plague Locals

Published on Thu, Aug 05, 2010

Earlier this year, the Center for American Progress and the American Immigration Council released studies estimating that comprehensive immigration reform, as described above, would increase the U.S. gross domestic product by at least $1.5 trillion over 10 years.

In Colorado, immigrants keep tourism going in small mountain towns with pricey real estate; they often drive hours each day to and from minimum-wage positions in ski towns. Migrants also work the fields and grunt construction jobs.

Published in the Colorado Springs Independent

K-2 Visa Holders

<This page is under construction>

The Legal Action Center's amicus brief for the Immigration Council and AILA, filed in In Re Ting Ting Chi, No. A96-533-521, argues that K-2 visa holders, the offspring of fiancé(e)s of U.S. citizens, may adjust even after turning 21 years of age as they are derivatives of non-citizen K-1 fiancé(e) parents. If you have a case that raises this issue, please contact us at clearinghouse@immcouncil.org.

  • In Re Anchalee Satidkunakorn, Case No: A096-722-341 (BIA amicus filed)
  • In Re Qiyu Zhang, Case No: A096-796-201 (BIA amicus filed)    
  • In Re Ting Ting Chi, Case No: A096-533-521 (BIA amicus filed)  

An Economic Look At Immigration Reform

What Legalizing Undocumented Immigrants Would Mean for the U.S. Economy

Washington D.C. - The Immigration Policy Center (IPC) will release a wide-ranging review of academic and government data that shows what legalizing undocumented immigrants would mean for the U.S. economy today, Monday, April 13th at 2pm EST.

Join leading economic analysts Gerald D. Jaynes, David Dyssegaard Kallick and Dan Siciliano, along with UFCW labor leader Esther Lopez, to learn more about how comprehensive immigration reform that includes a path to legalization for undocumented workers would  impact wages and working standards; affect tax revenue; and address undocumented immigration. Read more...

By the numbers: Illegal immigration might be down, but why and what does it mean?

Published on Wed, Sep 15, 2010

Mary Giovagnoli, director of the Washington, D.C.-based Immigration Policy Center, cautions about overstating the decline. "I don't think it's really a significant drop," Giovagnoli says. "Certainly, 8 percent is something, but if you look at where we were in 1990, then at the numbers of illegal immigration in 2009, the number of people here illegally has tripled."

It’s not just enforcement that matters, but policies, too. Giovagnoli thinks some policies that focus on enforcement haven’t deterred people from coming, and maybe made them more likely to stay out of status if they’re already here.

Published in the St. Louis Beacon

Litigation Clearinghouse Newsletter Vol. 4, No. 11

This issue highlights Supreme Court cases that will be argued this fall, judicial review of denied adjustment of status applications, challenges to the use of detainers, and updates from the LAC, including a recent victory in a naturalization delay case and favorable developments in a BIA case involving portability/Matter of Perez Vargas.

Published On: Friday, October 2, 2009 | Download File

With Republican dominance, how long till push for Arizona immigration law here?

Published on Thu, Nov 04, 2010

According to the Immigration Policy Center, S.B. 1070 “requires state and local law enforcement agencies to check the immigration status of individuals it encounters and makes it a state crime for noncitizens to fail to carry proper immigration documentation.”

Published in the Florida Independent

Litigation Clearinghouse Newsletter Vol. 2, No. 6

This issue covers mandatory detention challenge, lawsuit challenging ICE raid, BIA precedent decisions, LAC news, and resource for litigation CAT claims for children.

Published On: Wednesday, May 2, 2007 | Download File

Immigration talks intrigue UAFA supporters

Published on Wed, Feb 09, 2011

Mary Giovagnoli, director of the Immigration Policy Center, a think tank arm for the American Immigration Council, said predicting whether the 112th Congress would see UAFA as part of comprehensive immigration reform at this stage in talks is difficult.

“It’s hard to know whether it would make it into the final formalized piece of legislation because there’s just so many intangibles, especially when you don’t know who all the sponsors might be, where they’ll draw their lines in the sand,” she said.

 

Published in the Washington Blade