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Studying immigration brings to light the many interesting and diverse cultures in the world. Browse our lessons, printables, references, and articles below for ideas on how to enhance your curriculum in this area. You'll find statistics on U.S. immigration, lessons on Ellis Island, information on the Pilgrims, and much more for grades K-12. Improve students' reading skills as they learn about the lives of immigrants with our language arts activities.

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Americans pessimistic heading into Election Day 2010 -- but about what issues?

Published on Mon, Nov 01, 2010

Counters Michele Waslin of the Immigration Policy Center: "Legalized immigrants will earn more, pay more taxes, consume more, buy houses, start businesses, and contribute more to the economy."

Published in the The Christian Science Monitor

The Criminal Alien Program (CAP): Immigration Enforcement in Prisons and Jails

The Criminal Alien Program (CAP) is an expansive immigration enforcement program that leads to the initiation of removal proceedings in many cases. While CAP has existed in one form or another for decades, there is still much to be learned about the program, how it is organized, and how it works. What is known is that CAP extends to every area of the country and intersects with most state and local law enforcement agencies.

For years, the CAP program has operated with little public attention and many of its elements have only recently come to light following FOIA litigation against Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE). The information obtained through the lawsuit regarding CAP’s current organization and staffing suggests CAP is not a single program, but a loose-knit group of several different programs operating within ICE. Other than a small number of staff responsible for the administration of CAP at ICE headquarters, there is no dedicated CAP staff. Rather, ICE pulls personnel and resources from across the agency to perform CAP-related functions.  

The ICE declarations and deposition also explain how CAP functions within prisons and jails. There appears to be little consistency in, and little or no policy governing, how CAP cooperates with state and local law enforcement agencies in different regions and in how CAP interacts with detainees in different facilities. Instead, CAP appears to function as an ad hoc set of activities that operate differently across the country and across penal institutions, raising questions about the adequacy of oversight, training, and accountability of the personnel implementing CAP.

This information confirms that there is still much about CAP that remains unknown or unclear.  Given the breadth of CAP, the centrality of its role in immigration enforcement, and its large impact on the immigrant community, it is critical that ICE clarify how CAP operates.Read more...

"Virtual" fence ditched, GOP immigration rift?

Published on Wed, Jan 19, 2011

(While the federal government doesn’t seem likely to take up a broad discussion of immigration during this Congress, state governments continue to push their own laws. The left-leaning American Immigration Council has a guide on state immigration laws.)

Published in the Center for Investigative Reporting

Litigation Clearinghouse Newsletter Vol. 3, No. 1

This issue covers a recent SIJ decision enjoining the government from requiring specific consent for minors in federal custody, a Supreme Court update, an update on mandatory detention litigation, cases rejecting the BIA precedent Matter of Shanu, and a Q&A on a recent court decision addressing the ABC settlement.

Published On: Thursday, January 24, 2008 | Download File

Apply for J-1 Visa Sponsorship

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Apply for J-1 Visa Sponsorship

Potential J-1 applicants, host organizations, and attorneys interested in applying can learn more about the application requirements.

Southern Lawmakers Focus on Illegal Immigrants

Published on Fri, Mar 25, 2011

Some of the toughest bills in the nation aimed at illegal immigrants are making their way through legislatures in the South.

Proposed legislation in Alabama, Georgia and South Carolina, where Republicans control the legislatures and the governors’ mansions, have moved further than similar proposals in many other states, where concerns about the legality and financial impact of aggressive immigration legislation have stopped lawmakers.

Dozens of immigration-related bills showed up early in legislative sessions across the South. Some were aimed at keeping illegal immigrants from college or from marrying American citizens. Most died quickly, but three proposals designed to give police broader powers to identify and report illegal immigrants are moving forward.

The conservative political landscape, and a relatively recent and large addition of Latinos, both new immigrants and legal residents from other states, have contributed to the batch of legislation, say supporters and opponents of the proposed laws.

“The South has become a new gateway for immigrants,” said Wendy Sefsaf of the Immigration Policy Center, a research organization. “People see the culture shift, and they are a little bit freaked out.”

The Hispanic population in Alabama, for example, has increased by 144 percent since 2000, according to new census figures. In Mississippi, the numbers jumped by 106 percent, and in North Carolina by 111 percent. Over all, however, numbers remain small. Only about 4 percent of the population in Alabama is Hispanic. In South Carolina, the figure is 5 percent.

But Georgia has the seventh-largest population of illegal immigrants in the country, according to a report by the Pew Hispanic Center. There, a version of a law pioneered in Arizona would allow local police officers to inquire about the immigration status of people they suspect of committing crimes, including traffic violations.Read more...

Published in the New York Times

Litigation Clearinghouse Newsletter Vol. 1, No. 6

This issue covers litigation over naturalization delays, subpoenas when FOIA requests are delayed, and developments concerning mandatory detention.

Published On: Thursday, March 2, 2006 | Download File