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Legalization

Claudia M. Prado‐Meza

Claudia M. Prado‐Meza is a Ph.D. candidate at Iowa State University, focusing on sustaining rural communities in Mexico and outreach programs for Latino immigrants in Iowa.

AIC Executive Director Ben Johnson Published in The Hill

Published on Fri, Jun 21, 2013

Ben Johnson, the Executive Director of the American Immigration Council, recently published an article in The Hill.  The article, titled "Stop using legalization of the undocumented as a bargaining chip," focused on the amendments in the Senate bill designed to put off the road to citizenship until certain benchmarks were met.

Published in the The Hill

Raquel Rubio-Goldsmith

Raquel Rubio-Goldsmith is an adjunct lecturer, specializing in research and teaching on Mexican-American women's history, human rights, and immigration issues at the University of Arizona. A native of Douglas, Arizona, Rubio-Goldsmith completed undergraduate and graduate degrees in Law and Philosophy at the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM). She has taught at Pima Community College since 1969 and, since 1983, at the University of Arizona, where her primary focus has been the history of Mexicanas and Chicanas. She has taught courses on Mexican and Latin American history as well as developed curricula on Afro-American, Yaqui and Tohono O'odham histories. Rubio-Goldsmith has won numerous awards for teaching excellence.

IPC Report Featured in the Miami Herald

Published on Sat, Mar 29, 2014

The IPC's "Misplaced Priorities: Most Immigrants Deported by ICE in 2013 Were a Threat to No One" report was recently cited in an opinion piece by the Miami Herald's Mirta Ojito. This piece highlights the impact deportations have on families across the country.

"A report released this month by the Immigration Policy Center of the American Immigration Council revealed that most of the people being deported are not dangerous criminals, as we have been led to believe. In fact, most have 'committed relatively minor, nonviolent crimes or have no criminal histories at all,' the report concluded.

Two thirds of all deportees were apprehended at or near the border, while one third was stopped and detained from the 'interior of the country.' Immigration lawyers say the arrests are happening everywhere: at bus and train stops, on the streets, in homes and in workplaces."

Published in the Miami Herald

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AILF Mourns the Loss of Senator Edward M. Kennedy

Released on Tue, Aug 25, 2009

Today, America and the immigrant-rights community have lost one of their greatest champions. Senator Edward M. Kennedy's life-long commitment to civil rights extended from African Americans to the disabled to the millions of immigrants and refugees who come to our nation in search of a better life.

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Napolitano Confirmation Hearing Leaves Many Questions Unanswered

Released on Wed, Jan 14, 2009

Gov. Janet Napolitano's performance at today's confirmation hearing to serve as Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Secretary deserves an "A" for "know-how", but an "incomplete" for "how-to" reform DHS and our country's broken immigration system.

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Politics and Power: Immigration, Latino Voters, and the Texas Primary

Released on Wed, Feb 20, 2008

Texas is one of the three delegate-rich states remaining to vote in the presidential primaries. On March 4, all eyes will be on Texas—in part, to see the impact of the large Latino electorate in this important primary. Record-breaking turnout of Latino primary voters in states as disparate as California, Connecticut and Missouri portend an important role for Latinos voting in the upcoming Texas primary where they constitute 22.4 percent of the registered voters in Texas. Read on to learn more about the influence of Latinos and immigrants in the Lone Star state.

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