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Legalization

Jose Antonio Vargas

Year Released: 2012

SB 1070 Enforcement Will NOT Be Uniform

Published on Tue, Jul 27, 2010

The procedures followed by individual police agencies are not dictated by the board or the governor, however, and as a new study by the Immigration Policy Center shows there will be a wide variety of enforcement policies within Arizona, even with the law’s heavy-handed language about officers being required to do one thing or another and citizens being able to sue those they don’t believe to be enforcing the law.

Published in the Arizona Republic

Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals

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Published On: Wednesday, November 18, 2015 | Download File

Freedom, Fairness, & Equality

In this guided presentation, student will wrestle with the essential question: how deep is our commitment to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness?  They will learn about five historical examples of restrictive immigration law and policy and apply essential teachings of Dr. King in order to understand the value of youth civic engagement.
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Year Released: 2015

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Births to Illegal Immigrants Are Studied

Published on Wed, Aug 11, 2010

Some researchers noted that the Pew figures did not identify families where both parents were illegal immigrants. “If anything, the Pew report highlights how complicated this issue is, given that so many unauthorized immigrants live in families that include U.S. citizens and legal immigrants,” said Michele Waslin, senior policy analyst for the Immigration Policy Center, a group that supports legalization for illegal immigrants.

Published in the New York Times

Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA)

Tell the LAC about your DOMA (Defense of Marriage Act) cases

AIC’s Legal Action Center is interested in hearing about pending immigration cases that involve the validity of a marriage involving a lesbian or gay foreign national.  Please tell us about any case in which relief from removal hinges upon a qualifying spouse who is a lesbian or gay foreign national or any case in which an application for an immigration benefit (such as an I-130) hinges on recognition of a marriage involving a lesbian or gay foreign national.  Reply if you have a case that currently is pending:

  • in federal court (either district court or the court of appeals);
  • before the BIA or an IJ; or
  • before USCIS

Please tell us the status of the case, what decisions have been made on the case, and whether the adjudicator has agreed to hold the case in abeyance until the constitutionality of the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) is resolved by the courts or until there is further action by the BIA in Matter of Dorman, 25 I&N Dec. 485 (Attorney General 2011).    

Please send your responses to clearinghouse@immcouncil.org.

In cooperation with Immigration Equality, the National Immigration Project and Northwest Immigrant Rights Project, we are interested in assessing the status of pending cases and exploring possible remedies. 

Also, if you are interested in developments that relate to lesbian or gay marriages (and many other LGBT issues) please join the GLIG (LGBT interest group) of AILA.   You can sign up by clicking “View and Change Listservs” on your MyAILA page.)

Thank you!

In defense of the failed Dream Act immigration bill

Published on Mon, Sep 27, 2010

The Immigration Policy Center writes:

Acknowledging the large numbers of illegal Europeans in the U.S., the government devised ways for them to remain in the U.S. legally. *Deserving* illegal European immigrants could benefit from various programs and legalize their status. The 1929 Registry Act allowed *honest law-abiding alien[s] who may be in the country under some merely technical irregularity* to register as permanent residents for a fee of $20 if they could prove they had lived in the U.S. since 1921 and were of *good moral character.* Roughly 115,000 immigrants registered between 1930 and 1940—80% were European or Canadian. Between 1925 and 1965, 200,000 illegal Europeans legalized their status through the Registry Act, through *pre-examination*—a process that allowed them to leave the U.S. voluntarily and re-enter legally with a visa (a *touch-back* program)—or through discretionary rules that allowed immigration officials to suspend deportations in *meritorious* cases. Approximately 73% of those benefitting from suspension of deportation were Europeans (mostly Germans and Italians).

Published in the Washington Times

Litigation Clearinghouse Newsletter Vol. 4, No. 4

This issue covers a class action brought by religious workers seeking to file visa petitions and adjustment of status applications concurrently, circuit court decisions addressing IJ denials of continuances, updated AILF Litigation Issue Pages, a Favorable Fifth Circuit decision on the FTCA, and a new Eighth Circuit resource for litigators.

Published On: Thursday, March 26, 2009 | Download File