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Community Education Center Resources

K-12 teachers, who are often pressed for time and lack adequate resources, need up-to-date, factual, teacher-written and classroom-tested teaching materials when discussing and teaching immigration-related topics in the classroom. The Community Education Center is committed to providing teachers with the tools and resources they need to prepare fair and informative lessons.

The Community Education Center strives to enhance classroom learning by providing a wide variety of accessible and creative educational teaching resources to fit the need of every modern classroom. Our annual Teachers' Resource Guide, created by teachers for teachers, provides new lesson plans, book reviews and other valuable educational tools. The center also provides additional K-12 teacher-written lesson plans, suggested reading lists and links to other educational resources.Read more...

Quick Fact: Immigrants make up the majority of computer science students

Two-thirds of electrical engineering and computer science graduate students at U.S. colleges are foreign nationals

Saying "sí" to business opportunities

Published on Wed, Jan 18, 2012

Manny and Vicky Gonzalez are reminded each day that it isn’t only Spanish speaking people who stop to purchase Mexican (“tortas”) sandwiches at their two restaurants in Minneapolis.

“A lot of Minnesotans have learned that there is more to Mexican food than tacos,” said Manny, who with his wife started Manny’s Tortas along Lake Street in 1999.

In the past century, long-time Minnesota families learned there was more to Italian cuisine than pizza, and that Chinese food is regional and far more complex than chow mein. Now, Minnesotans with newly acquired tastes for the Gonzalez’s Mexican sandwiches drive from throughout the Twin Cities metro area to their two shops in Minneapolis’ Mercado Central and Midtown Global Market.    

U.S. Census data from 2010, anecdotal evidence about immigrant entrepreneurship, and a recently released study from the Immigration Policy Center show Minnesota is rapidly changing. Days of sputtering along and resisting change should be behind us. New Minnesotans are changing the demographic portrait of the state and communities. New ethnic entrepreneurs are changing the mix of businesses and the products and services being offered in commerce.

Hector Garcia, executive director of the Chicano Latino Affairs Council (CLAC), refers to the benefits of this commerce as “cultural complementarities.” The long established Minnesota society learns from immigrants and refugees entering the state in search of opportunities, he said, and new arrivals learn from established businesses, groups and people.

What’s more, new Census data show that immigrants now comprise 8.3 percent of the Minnesota workforce. From them, Garcia said, existing Minnesota businesses and its large corporations gain knowledge for opening even more trade and business relationships with countries and businesses abroad, paving the way for even more economic activity.Read more...

Published in the Twin Cities Daily Planet

2007 Winner, Ben Groselak

"Immigration To Our Great Nation"

 By Ben Groselak

 SS. Cyril & Methodius Parish and School

 Lemont, Illinois

 

A lot of people from far and wide,

come to America with nothing to hide.

A new life to start…

an American citizen…a dream in their heart.

 

Imagine the strife of traveling so far,

aboard a boat, a train or even a car.

Leaving your homeland, what a decision…

to come to a strange country of mixed composition.

 

Immigration has made a great nation…

new ideas, languages, cultures and creations.

All our lives have been touched by the blending,

the music, the foods, the inventions…by immigrants ascending.

 

What do they hope for? Why do they come?

They come for religious choice, to join their family…

they come to have a voice.

Most of all, however, they come for freedom.

 

How lucky am I to live in this land that is free!

How fortunate am I to know that I don’t have to leave!

I am blessed to be here…and I am extremely proud to say…

 

“America is just where I plan to stay!”

 

Kansas Officials Await Ruling on Arizona Immigration Law

Published on Sun, Apr 08, 2012

TOPEKA — Kansas hasn’t adopted an Arizona-like immigration law, but several current and former elected officials from Kansas have chosen sides as the issue goes before the U.S. Supreme Court.

The court will hear arguments April 25 in the legal battle between the state of Arizona and the federal government over the immigration law known as Senate Bill 1070.

Kris Kobach, a Republican who before being elected Kansas secretary of state gained national attention by pushing tough anti-immigration laws, helped write SB 1070. The measure was adopted by the Arizona Legislature and enacted by Gov. Jan Brewer in 2010.

The law contained a number of controversial provisions that are now front and center before the Supreme Court.

One of the most controversial requires local police in Arizona to determine the immigration status of anyone stopped if there is a reasonable suspicion that the person is in the country illegally.

The Justice Department says regulating immigration is the job of the federal government, not the states. Officials in Arizona, a state bordering Mexico, say the feds haven’t done their jobs and that is one of the reasons for SB 1070.

In addition to legal briefs from the specific parties in the case, the Supreme Court has received approximately 40 legal briefs from others who support and oppose SB 1070, according to a report completed by the Immigration Policy Center, a nonpartisan group whose mission “is to shape a rational conversation on immigration and immigrant integration.”

Kansas is one of 16 states that have signed on in support of SB 1070. That decision was made by Kansas Attorney General Derek Schmidt, a Republican. Schmidt’s office says he supports preserving powers of states to promote public safety. His office said Kansas has not spent any money in the litigation.Read more...

Published in the Lawrence Journal World

Where are our J-1 Participants?

Ever wonder if there are other J-1 Trainees and Interns in your area? This map shows which states have exchange visitors. If you would like to go one step further and connect with other participants in your state, just go to our Facebook page and start a discussion!

 

What happens next in Arizona?

Published on Mon, Jun 25, 2012

IPC staff lawyer Ben Winograd was quoted in a Washington Post blog post covering what the Supreme Court decision will mean in Arizona: Read more...

Published in the The Washington Post

2012 Creative Writing Contest 2nd Place Winner: Nikita Ranjit Nair

America through a Kaleidoscope

By: Nikita Ranjit Nair

 Austin, TX

 

I closed my eyes and imagined all the people as Lennon asked.

I wondered what was in this America.

I thought of vast cornfields, smoky mountains, and wondrous golden bridges.

I recalled majestic towers scraping the skies, watched over by a lady with a torch.

I imagined the rivers, gulfs, lakes, dams and other great American waters.

This is what I saw….

I saw hard working people all over our America.

Some had jobs, some gave up looking, and some never lost hope.

I saw in my mind’s eye all these beauties but something was missing.

I closed my eyes tighter and asked John to help me Imagine better.

This is what I saw….

People from all over the world.

Coming to America with dreams,

They bring ideas, imagination, and creativity.

They bring culture, traditions and their values.

They bring hard work, perseverance, and strength.

Then I smiled when I saw them.

Diversity and its true meaning.

To bring different people together to keep America great.

In my land of the beautiful, the free, and the united.

Come on over those who want to work here.

Respect our country and you shall be Americans like us.

 

AIC's Wendy Feliz-Sefsaf in Politico

Published on Thu, Jan 03, 2013

Wendy Feliz-Sefsaf, Communications Director at the AIC, was quoted in this article on Politico:

"When the 113th Congress digs into immigration reform with renewed vigor in the new year, no lawmaker will find himself in quite so tight a spot as Rep. Mike Honda.

It’s a position, however, very much relished by Honda, a seven-term Democrat from the San Jose area. His district, California’s redrawn 15th, is among the nation’s most complicated on this hot-button issue — dominated by major high-tech firms focused on importing high-skilled labor as well as huge minority populations seeking paths to citizenship."

Read more here.

 

Published in the Politico

Ron Gordon

President and CEO ZGS Communications

Ron Gordon, a native of Lima, Peru, is the owner, CEO and President of ZGS Communications and ZGS Broadcasting. Mr. Gordon arrived in the U.S. almost 30 years ago as a teenager and his entrepreneurial spirit quickly emerged. He began a paper listing the local soccer scores because he missed his favorite sport and realized that many other immigrants like him longed to follow soccer as well.

Mr. Gordon continued with communications work to fill a gap in the Latino community. He considered what he missed from back home in Peru and thought of the Hispanic artists and television shows that he watched as a boy. Mr. Gordon ventured to work in the growing Hispanic news and entertainment industry and to create some of the first U.S. produced television shows for the Latino community.

In 1989, Mr. Gordon formed ZGS Broadcasting, Inc. which consists of three Spanish television stations located in Washington, D.C., Tampa and Orlando, Florida, as well as two Spanish radio stations in Tampa, Florida. The television and radio stations reach more than one million Hispanic people. In 1997, ZGS Communications, Inc. and ZGS Broadcasting, Inc. had combined revenues of approximately $8 million.

As a leading producer of programming with Hispanic content, ZGS Communications was nominated for four Emmys and won two. ZGS is currently one of the leading Hispanic communications firms that assists companies in developing advertising, marketing, and public relations strategies aimed at the Latino community.