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'New American' Voter Registration Report Released

Published on Thu, Oct 14, 2010

As of 2008, "New Americans" were one in ten of all registered voters in the country, according to a new Immigration Policy Center report. Two-thirds of those are naturalized U.S. citizens and a little over one-third are the American-born children of immigrants, primarily from Latin America and Asia.

Transcript:

Good morning, I’m Elizabeth Wynne Johnson; this is Power Breakfast from Capitol News Connection.

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A new report out today offers an updated snapshot of a profound shift in electoral demographics.

EWING As of 2008, New Americans were one in ten of all registered voters in the country. That’s 15 million registered voters.

What’s a “New American”? Walter Ewing, senior researcher at the Immigration Policy Center, breaks it down: roughly two-thirds are naturalized US citizens; a little over one-third are the American-born children of immigrants, primarily from Latin America and Asia. Since the Census Bureau first started collecting this data in 1996, the total number of ‘New American’ voters has jumped more than one-hundred percent. As of 2008, they had the numbers to play a pivotal role.

EWING We did identify states in which the number of New American registered voters was greater than the numbers of votes by which either Obama or McCain won the state… That was the case in FL, CA, TX, NC, NJ, GA, VA, AZ, MO, NV, IN and Montana, even.

To identify New Americans as a voting “bloc,” however, has its limits.

EWING They’re a “bloc” in the sense of having a personal connection to immigrant experience – but that doesn’t mean they all vote the same way.

Candidates – especially those in close elections – would do well to take heed of one over-arching characteristic.

EWING It is likely, given their personal connection to the immigrant experience, that these voters are not going to take very kindly to political rhetoric that demonizes immigrants – because that’s going to be either themselves or their parents.

‘New Americans’ also make up a growing percentage of registered voters overall.

Published in the Capital News Connection | Read Article