Skip to Content

Programs:

Legalization

Dr. Edward R. Braithwaite

Edward R. Braithwaite was born in Guyana, South America. A British colony at the time, it did not offer facilities for tertiary education to its nationals. Seeking higher education outside the country, he gained admittance to Cambridge University in England.

During his first year as a student, war broke out between England and Germany. Volunteering for military service, he became a fighter pilot in the Royal Air Force. At war's end, he returned to Cambridge and completed his degree in Physics.

He was suddenly and painfully confronted with one of the realities of British life from which both Cambridge and fellowship in the Royal Air Force had sheltered him - the cruel rigors of racial discrimination within British society.

Dr. Braithwaite eventually found employment as a teacher in one of London's most depressed neighborhoods. Over time he came to the surprising realization that he had an aptitude for teaching and writing. He applied himself to achieve some measure of ease and confidence within both disciplines. This led him to write about his experience in teaching, resulting in the publication of his first book "TO SIR, WITH LOVE".

In 1960 he was invited to work in Paris, France as Human Rights Officer for the World Veterans Foundation and later moved to UNESCO as an Education Consultant. When Guyana became independent from Britain in 1966, the new government asked him to be its first ambassador to the United Nations.Read more...

AIC Executive Director Ben Johnson in the New York Times

Published on Tue, May 21, 2013

The AIC's Executive Director, Ben Johnson, was quoted in an article in the New York Times.  The article, titled "Veteran Senator Emerges as Player on Immigration Overhaul," focuses on Senator Orrin Hatch's role in the Senate Judiciary Committee's mark-up of the immigration bill.

"Though he backed away from immigration reform when he faced a tough primary challenge in 2012, many immigration advocates believe he is now ready to come around to their side.

“I think there is the political space now for Senator Hatch to talk about these issues that he has a track record of being supportive of,” said Ben Johnson, the executive director of the American Immigration Council."

Published in the New York Times

Geraldo Cadava

Geraldo Cadava, a native of Tucson, Arizona, specializes in histories of the U.S.‐Mexico border region and Latina and Latino populations in the United States. Harvard University Press will publish The Heat of Exchange, his book about culture and commerce in the Arizona‐Sonora border region since World War II, in 2012. Cadava teaches courses on Mexican American History, Latino Studies, the U.S.‐Mexico Borderlands, and Race and Ethnicity in the United States at Northwestern University.

AIC's Ben Johnson Featured in the South Florida Sun-Sentinel

Published on Wed, Oct 16, 2013

Ben Johnson, the Executive Director of the American Immigration Council, was recently published in the South Florida Sun Sentinel in an article titled, "Costs too High Not to Act on US Immigration Reform."  Johnson was making an argument based off of the recent IPC publication, "The Cost of Doing Nothing:  Dollars, Lives, and Opportunities Lost in the Wait for Immigration Reform."

Published in the South Florida Sun-Sentinel

Eric L. Olson

Eric L. Olson is Senior Advisor to the Security Initiative at the Mexico Institute of the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington, DC. He served as the Interim‐Director for Government Relations at Amnesty International USA, and was Amnesty’s Advocacy Director for the Americas from 2002‐2006. Prior to Amnesty, he was the Senior Associate for Mexico, and Economic Policy at the Washington Office on Latin America for eight years. He worked at Augsburg College’s Center for Global Education in Cuernavaca, Mexico from 1989‐1993 where he was the program director. From 1986‐1988, he worked in Honduras, Central America as a development specialist for several local non‐governmental organizations.

 

Senate Health Care Reform Bill: Heavy on Rhetoric, Short on Policy

Released on Wed, Sep 16, 2009

While attempting to reform the nation's health care system, both Congress and the White House are facing considerable pressure to include immigration-related restrictions that are long on rhetoric and short on results. Faced with pressure from the right and immigration restrictionists, the new Senate mark includes over-the-top measures to exclude illegal immigrants and restrict the participation of legal immigrants. These poor policies are nonsensical, do not protect public health, and will undoubtedly result in the exclusion of U.S. citizens. Furthermore, inclusion of these provisions has failed to win support of the very critics they were trying to appease.

View Release

The LAC Docket | Volume III, Issue 1

The Newsletter of the American Immigration Council’s Legal Action Center

January 16, 2013
Our Work | Quick Links | Donate

OUR WORK

   Access to Counsel

LAC Challenges DHS Restrictions on Access to Counsel, Court Orders Release of USCIS Counsel Policies

AIC v. DHS and USCIS, No. 1:11-cv-01971 (D.D.C. filed Nov. 8, 2011)
AIC v. DHS and CBP, No. 1:11-cv-01972 (D.D.C. filed Nov. 8, 2011)
AIC v. DHS and ICE, No. 1:12-cv-00856 (D.D.C. filed May 31, 2012)Read more...

Want to Stall, not Stimulate, the Economy?

Released on Wed, Feb 04, 2009

Efforts by anti-immigrant groups to persuade Congress to expand the E-Verify program as part of the economic stimulus bill would hinder, not help, the U.S. economy's recovery. IPC’s analysis shows that any attempt to expand E-Verify overnight would be a costly and chaotic mistake that would neither help the economy nor fix our broken immigration system.

View Release

DACA Blogs at Immigration Impact

The Legal Action Center and the Immigration Policy Center has blogged extensively about DACA at Immigration Impact. Here are our past blogs on the topic:Read more...

The Impact of "Quick Fixes" on U.S. Citizens and the Economy

Released on Wed, Mar 26, 2008

Proposals regarding employment verification for all workers – foreign- and U.S.-born alike – are gathering steam in Congress. IPC’s new OnPoint documents highlight the impact recently proposed immigration enforcement tools would have on U.S. citizens, authorized workers, and the economy.

View Release