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Justice Alma L. López

Justice Alma L. López was born in Laredo, Texas on August 17, 1943, and was raised and educated in San Antonio, Texas. Justice López was appointed to the Fourth Court by Governor Ann Richards in October 1993, becoming the first Hispanic woman to serve on the Fourth Court of Appeals and the first Hispanic woman to serve as Chief Justice in the State of Texas. She was elected to a full term of six (6) years on November 8, 1994, taking office on January 1, 1995. She was re-elected to a second term in November 2000.

Justice López graduated from St. Mary’s University with a B.B.A. in 1965 and from St. Mary’s Law School with a J.D. in 1968. Justice López practiced law for twenty-five years, twenty of those as a sole practitioner prior to being appointed to the Court.

Justice López is the recipient of many awards including the Award for Outstanding Achievement from the Mexican American Bar Association in 1998. She was inducted into the San Antonio Women’s Hall of Fame for Public Service in 2002 and received the National Association of Women Lawyers President’s Award for Excellence in 2004. She is listed in the Who’s Who Among Outstanding Americans.Read more...

AIC Executive Director Ben Johnson Published in The Hill

Published on Fri, Jun 21, 2013

Ben Johnson, the Executive Director of the American Immigration Council, recently published an article in The Hill.  The article, titled "Stop using legalization of the undocumented as a bargaining chip," focused on the amendments in the Senate bill designed to put off the road to citizenship until certain benchmarks were met.

Published in the The Hill

Claudia M. Prado‐Meza

Claudia M. Prado‐Meza is a Ph.D. candidate at Iowa State University, focusing on sustaining rural communities in Mexico and outreach programs for Latino immigrants in Iowa.

IPC Report Featured in the Miami Herald

Published on Sat, Mar 29, 2014

The IPC's "Misplaced Priorities: Most Immigrants Deported by ICE in 2013 Were a Threat to No One" report was recently cited in an opinion piece by the Miami Herald's Mirta Ojito. This piece highlights the impact deportations have on families across the country.

"A report released this month by the Immigration Policy Center of the American Immigration Council revealed that most of the people being deported are not dangerous criminals, as we have been led to believe. In fact, most have 'committed relatively minor, nonviolent crimes or have no criminal histories at all,' the report concluded.

Two thirds of all deportees were apprehended at or near the border, while one third was stopped and detained from the 'interior of the country.' Immigration lawyers say the arrests are happening everywhere: at bus and train stops, on the streets, in homes and in workplaces."

Published in the Miami Herald

Raquel Rubio-Goldsmith

Raquel Rubio-Goldsmith is an adjunct lecturer, specializing in research and teaching on Mexican-American women's history, human rights, and immigration issues at the University of Arizona. A native of Douglas, Arizona, Rubio-Goldsmith completed undergraduate and graduate degrees in Law and Philosophy at the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM). She has taught at Pima Community College since 1969 and, since 1983, at the University of Arizona, where her primary focus has been the history of Mexicanas and Chicanas. She has taught courses on Mexican and Latin American history as well as developed curricula on Afro-American, Yaqui and Tohono O'odham histories. Rubio-Goldsmith has won numerous awards for teaching excellence.

President Obama Leads Immigration Reform Debate

Released on Thu, Jun 25, 2009

Today the President, Vice President, and key cabinet members met with a bipartisan group of Senate and House leaders representing the spectrum of opinion on immigration to get the ball moving forward on comprehensive immigration reform.

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Carmen A. DiPlacido – A Champion and a Friend

The American Immigration Council mourns the loss of Carmen A. DiPlacido, an extraordinary lawyer known as much for his kind and gentle spirit as for his singular expertise in citizenship, naturalization and consular practice.  He had superb intellect, enormous practical knowledge, huge institutional memory, and unstinting and consistent generosity in sharing it all.

Before joining the private bar in 1997, Carmen had a distinguished 27-year career in the U.S. Department of State, where he served in numerous positions, including Director, Office of Citizens Consular Services and Director, Office of Policy Review and Interagency Liaison, Overseas Citizens Services, as well as Acting Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for Passport Services and Acting Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for Overseas Citizens Services.  A singular contribution of his was the landmark Child Citizenship Act of 2000, which Carmen authored to imbue derivative citizenship with his trademark fairness and compassion.

In addition to his long-time support for our work here at the Immigration Council, Carmen was an ardent supporter of individuals with special needs, and was the president of the board of directors of Porto Charities, Inc., a charitable organization dedicated to actively assisting people with developmental or intellectual disabilities; their community and their environment.  

Carmen is survived by his wife, Ann, and his daughter, Christie.

Carmen was a colleague and a dear friend to us all.  He will be missed by all those who had the pleasure of knowing him.

Carmen A. DiPlacido

Bipartisan Immigration Bill Recaptures Unused Visas

Released on Mon, Sep 08, 2008

This week, the House Judiciary Committee will mark-up H.R. 5882--a bipartisan bill which will allow for the critical recapturing of visas that have gone unused in past years due to bureaucratic delays and instead permit the visas be issued to family-based or employment-based legal immigrants.

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CIS Report Attempts to Erase 100 Years of Data

Wishful Thinking on Immigration and Crime

Released on Wed, Nov 18, 2009

A new report from the restrictionist group Center for Immigration Studies (CIS), Immigration and Crime: Assessing a Conflicted Issue, attempts to overturn a century’s worth of research which has demonstrated repeatedly that immigrants are less likely than the native-born to commit violent crimes or end up behind bars.

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