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Time for Congress to Go Back to Bi-Partisan Comprehensive Solutions to Immigration

Released on Tue, Oct 20, 2015

Washington D.C. - Today, the Senate rejected the motion to proceed on Senator David Vitter’s (R-LA) “Stop Sanctuary Policies and Protect Americans Act” (S. 2146). This bill is an enforcement-only approach to immigration and would punish cities and states that adopt community policing policies that work to make communities safer and increase communication between police and their residents. The procedural vote required 60 Yea votes to begin debate on the bill; the motion failed 54-45. 

The following is a statement by Benjamin Johnson, Executive Director of the American Immigration Council:

"The Senate vote is a rejection of another flawed piece of legislation that was overwhelming opposed by faith, law enforcement and immigrant advocates around the country. It stands in stark contrast to the last piece of immigration legislation passed in June 2013, which followed a model of bipartisanship and that understood and addressed the need for comprehensive solutions to our outdated immigration system. 

Clearly the components for success require that efforts be bipartisan and comprehensive. It’s time for Congress to end its politically-motivated and failed attempts at enforcement-only legislation and get back to work on passing meaningful reform that can, in fact, fix our outdated immigration system."

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For press inquiries, contact Wendy Feliz at wfeliz@immcouncil.org or 202-507-752

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Opinion polls show broad support for tough Arizona immigration law

Published on Fri, Apr 30, 2010

Two lawsuits challenging the constitutionality of Arizona’s new immigration law – and the promise of more to come – represent the latest in a surge of outrage over the first-of-its-kind measure to crack down on illegal immigration. The lawsuits follow high-profile protests, calls for boycotts, and a travel advisory from Mexico urging its citizens to steer clear of Arizona.

Published in the The Christian Science Monitor

Our Melting Pot: Meeting, Eating and Growing Together

The goal of Our Melting Pot is to develop knowledge and appreciation of the diversity of nations from which our students' ancestors came. By creating his/her own Immigration cookbook, students will appreciate their ancestry and learn about how certain foods are incorporated in to life in the United States.

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Citizenship-By-Birth Faces Challenges

Published on Tue, May 25, 2010

Many other lawyers say that's a false reading. "Of course they're under our jurisdiction," says Michele Waslin, senior policy analyst with the American Immigration Council, which works to protect the legal rights of immigrants. "If they commit a crime, they're subject to the jurisdiction of the courts."

Published in the NPR

The § 237(a)(1)(H) Fraud Waiver

This Practice Advisory discusses the § 237(a)(1)(H) waiver for fraud or misrepresentation at admission that would otherwise render deportable certain LPRs and Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) self-petitioners. The advisory addresses contexts in which the waiver is available, the statutory eligibility requirements, and the relief that results from a grant of the waiver.

Published On: Monday, June 1, 2009 | Download File

Teachable Moment

Immigration policy is a hotly debated issue in the country and in Congress. The immigration bill now before Congress presents a teachable moment for students to consider the pros and cons of a new policy. The reading provides an overview of the bill that originated in the Senate; the DBQ offers multiple points of view on it. Discussion questions about them and an essay assignment follow.

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¿Cuanto questa?: An Investigation into the True Costs of Illegal Immigration

Published on Wed, Jun 23, 2010

“There are many reports that confirm immigrants contribute to the economy,” said P.U.E.B.L.O. Executive Director Belen Seara, referring directly to studies from the Immigration Policy Center and the University of Southern California.

The Immigration Policy Center reported via the Texas-based Perryman Group, “If all unauthorized immigrants were removed from California, the state would lose $164.2 billion in expenditures, $72.9 billion in economic output, and approximately 717,000 jobs, even accounting for adequate market adjustment time.”

These figures are based in part on income and sales tax revenues and Social Security revenues.

Published in the New Times

DHS Review of Low Priority Cases for Prosecutorial Discretion

This Practice Advisory addresses the implementation of DHS’s prosecutorial discretion guidelines and provides detail about how DHS’s new joint working group will determine low priority immigration cases.

Published On: Monday, February 13, 2012 | Download File

Guide to Prosecutorial Discretion

A guide to understanding prosecutorial discretion creativly put together by NotOneMoreDeportation.com.  NotOneMoreDeportation.com is a project of NDLON meant to foster collaboration between individuals, organizations, artists, and allies to expose, confront, and overcome unjust immigration laws.

Year Released: 2013

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Study Says Northwest Immigrants Have Big Economic Impact

Published on Thu, Jul 29, 2010

The Immigration Policy Center, based in the nation's capital, pulled together immigration data from a variety of sources. Then it released fact sheets for all 50 states.

The center's Wendy Sefsaf says the study concludes that, if all undocumented workers were booted out of the Northwest immediately, the economic impact would be huge.

Wendy Sefsaf: "The undocumented are part of our workforce and they're people who buy and consume goods. So if you get rid of them, there's less consumers, which means there's less money going into an economy that supports those jobs."

The center's study concludes illegal immigrants have a bigger economic impact in Washington than in other Northwest states. Regionwide, the research estimates spending by undocumented workers is responsible for about 90-thousand jobs.

The Pew Hispanic Center estimates five percent of Oregon workers are undocumented, compared to about three percent in Washington and Idaho.

Published in the NPR KPLU