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Villaraigosa Urges Hispanics to Vote

Published on Wed, Apr 04, 2012

CHARLOTTE, North Carolina – Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa, who will chair the Democratic National Convention here in September, on Tuesday urged Hispanics in North Carolina to vote “for those who don’t have a voice” in the presidential elections in November.

“If we don’t vote, neither of the two parties are going to take us into account. You have to go out and register people and, above all, motivate those who can to become U.S. citizens,” said Villaraigosa in a meeting with Hispanic reporters in Charlotte.

In his first visit to the Queen City, one of the country’s highest-profile Latino politicians reiterated that since North Carolina is the state that has had the biggest growth in the country in its Hispanic community, its voting power is “essential.”

“The figures point to it and we know it: the Hispanic vote is important, and we’ll work very hard to get it,” Villaraigosa emphasized.

The mayor on Tuesday toured Charlotte’s convention center and Bank of America stadium, where President Barack Obama will accept the nomination of his party in September.

The number of Hispanics in North Carolina increased by 111 percent over the past decade to more than 800,000, representing 8.4 percent of the state’s residents.

According to figures compiled by the North Carolina state elections board, in 2008 there were more than 68,000 Hispanics registered to vote and of those 20,648 voted in the presidential elections that November.

Obama won North Carolina by a scanty 14,177 votes, the first time since 1976 that a Democratic presidential candidate had garnered the state’s 15 electoral votes.

A post-electoral analysis by the Washington-based Immigration Policy Center emphasized that those Hispanic votes that went to the Democrats were “indispensable” in helping Obama win the Tar Heel state.

Published in the Latin American Herald Tribune

What We Do

Litigation and Advocacy

The LAC uses litigation and advocacy as tools to protect the rights of noncitizens. We litigate in the federal courts, focusing our work on cases that have a wide impact.  We also advocate before the immigration agencies to help ensure that the immigration laws are implemented properly.  The following are our litigation and advocacy priorities: Read more...

Immigration Reform a Break for DREAMers Looking to Work

Published on Mon, Jun 18, 2012

IPC director Mary Giovagnoli was quoted in an Epoch Times story covering President Obama's announcement of deferred action for 'DREAMers:' Read more...

Published in the The Epoch Times

Immigrant Youth Achievement Award Nomination

Immigrant Youth Achievement Award Nomination Deadline February 1, 2012.

In a media fueled environment where the label “immigrant” has taken on such negative and hateful qualities, the American Immigration Council works to combat these stereotypes by holding up exemplary youth in our communities as examples of the positive contributions young immigrants are making in our country everyday.  The Immigrant Youth Achievement Award recognizes a young immigrant in the United States whose accomplishments are the embodiment of the immigrant spirit and show a commitment to making a positive impact in their community or the world around them.

The Immigrant Youth Achievement Award is presented at the American Immigration Council’s annual Washington, DC Immigrant Achievement Awards each Spring.  Past honorees have emigrated from countries such as Ireland, India, Cambodia, China, and Cuba and have made contributions in literature, journalism, music and politics.

Criteria

In determining the selection of a nominee to receive the American Immigration Council’s Immigrant Youth Achievement Award, the selection committee will use the following criteria:Read more...

Mary Giovagnoli: The TT Interview

Published on Thu, Nov 15, 2012

IPC's director, Mary Giovagnoli, was interviewed by Julián Aguilar of The Texas Tribune.  Read the interview below to learn more about immigration politics and reform: Read more...

Published in the The Texas Tribune

Victor Villaseñor

Born in the barrio of Carlsbad, California in 1940, Victor Villaseñor was raised on a ranch four miles north in Oceanside. Since his parents were born in Mexico, Villaseñor spoke only Spanish until beginning school. After years of facing language and cultural barriers, heavy discrimination and a reading problem, later diagnosed as dyslexia, Mr. Villaseñor dropped out of high school his junior year and moved to Mexico. There he discovered a wealth of Mexican art, literature, music, that helped him recapture and understand the dignity and richness of his heritage.

Mr. Villaseñor returned to the U.S. at the age of 20. He began to feel the old frustration and rage return as he witnessed again the disregard toward poor and uneducated people and especially toward the Mexicans. Then a chance encounter with James Joyce’s Portrait Of An Artist As A Young Man, changed his life. It awakened a desire to confront through literature the problems associated with his cultural heritage that continued to plague him.

After producing nine novels, 65 short stories, and receiving 265 rejections Villaseñor sold his first novel, Macho!, which the Los Angeles Times compared to the best of Steinbeck. This began a journey that would eventually lead to the publication of the national bestseller, Rain of Gold. Published in seven languages and used by thousands of teachers and school systems across the nation as required reading, Rain of Gold tells the story of Mr. Villaseñor’s family, taking the reader from war-torn Mexico during the Revolution to the present day.Read more...

IPC Report Featured on ABC-Univision

Published on Mon, Jul 15, 2013

In a recent article, ABC News-Univision mentioned the recently published IPC report "Allies Not Enemies."  The article, "How Immigration Reform Could Help Black Workers," said:

"The Immigration Policy Center, a pro-reform group, found that African Americans living in cities with higher rates of immigration from Latin America fared better than those in cities with lower rates."

Published in the ABC News-Univision

Hannah Lewis

Hannah Lewis specializes in community development strategies around engaging new immigrants with farming backgrounds in local food systems. She was a program coordinator with the North Central Regional Center for Rural Development at Iowa State University while conducting research for this paper and now works in Des Moines, Iowa, for a national non‐profit working in sustainable agriculture and rural communities.

IPC Data on Texas DREAMers Cited in The Dallas Morning News

Published on Tue, Feb 04, 2014

The Dallas Morning News recently cited data from the IPC's report "Who and Where the DREAMers Are, Revised Estimates". The article, titled "Bipartisan Group Announces $25 Million Scholarship Fund for Undocumented Students", covered the unveiling of a scholarship fund for undocumented students by San Antonio Democratic activist Henry Muñoz III, former Washington Post CEO Donald E. Graham, and Carlos Gutierrez, a Commerce Secretary under President George W. Bush 

"1,000 high-achieving undocumented students will each receive a $25,000 scholarship from the initiative, called TheDream.US. The effort has been funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, The Inter-American Development Bank, the Graham family, and other philanthropies. Some of that scholarship money will go to students in Texas.

'In the state of Texas, we live with this every day,” said Muñoz, who serves as national finance chairman for the Democratic Party. 'You’re probably living down the street from someone who is a dreamer and you don’t even know it. They’re are neighbors, they’re the people who work with us.'

Texas has nearly 300,000 dreamers, according to estimates from the American Immigration Council."

Published in the The Dallas Morning News

Rubén Rumbaut, Ph.D.

Rubén Rumbaut, Ph.D. is professor of sociology at the University of California, Irvine. He is the founding chair of the section on international migration of the American Sociological Association and a member of the National Research Council’s Committee on Population. He codirects the Children of Immigrants Longitudinal Study, began in 1991, as well as a large-scale study of Immigration and Intergenerational Mobility in Metropolitan Los Angeles. He is the author of more than one hundred scientific papers on immigrants and refugees in the U.S., and coauthor or coeditor of a dozen books. A native of Havana, Cuba, he has a Ph.D. in sociology from Brandeis University.