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Dems: Immigration reform would help reduce deficit

Published on Tue, May 04, 2010

Democrats want immigration reform on the table as the White House fiscal commission examines ways to reduce deficits, saying there is a “credible connection” between the issue and the country’s fiscal situation.

Service Employees International Union (SEIU) President Andy Stern and Rep. Xavier Becerra (Calif.), both Democrats on the bipartisan fiscal commission, said reforms giving the 12 million illegal immigrants in the United States a chance to stay in the U.S. legally could boost the economy and thereby help pay down the debt.

Published in the The Hill

Fence isn't a cure-all for America's porous border

Published on Thu, May 27, 2010

Immigrant rights advocates say the fence prompts migrants to cross in remote areas where they face dangerous, often deadly obstacles.

"It's a very big problem," said Walter Ewing, a senior researcher for the pro-immigrant Immigration Policy Center.

Published in the Associated Press

Securing Communities

Published on Thu, Jul 08, 2010

The Immigration Policy Center, an arm of the Washington-based American Immigration Council, says the program lacks sufficient oversight and a clear procedure for people detained in error to lodge complaints.

Published in the Toledo Blade

The Fugitive Disentitlement Doctrine: FOIA and Petitions for Review

The fugitive disentitlement doctrine arises in the immigration context when courts of appeals use the doctrine to dismiss petitions for review and when government agencies invoke the doctrine to deny FOIA requests. This Practice Advisory examines how the courts and the agencies apply the doctrine in these contexts.

Published On: Monday, April 29, 2013 | Download File

Exhibit Hall

Becoming Americans: A Historical Perspective

Exhibit by Phillip Ratner  


When Eleanor Sreb, of the Smithsonian Folklife Center, and Ross Holland, National Park Service Associate Director for Cultural Resources Management, approached artist Phillip Ratner to create artwork for Ellis Island, Ratner initially thought, "How do I fit the entire world into a single piece?" Ratner sat for hours on a bench in the Great Hall at Ellis Island sketching, thinking, observing--trying to capture the essence of the immigration experience. Ratner conjured up images of the millions of immigrants who passed through that Great Hall--travel weary people of all ages, creeds and nationalities who hungered for a new life in America. "I picked up the ghosts," Ratner said, "and it changed my life. I felt my grandparents' energy and that of the thousands of immigrants who passed through those halls."

Read more...

Birthright Citizenship: The Big Republican Issue for 2010 Elections?

Published on Mon, Aug 02, 2010

Supporters of a change say the amendment adopted just after the Civil War was designed simply to make sure that former slaves became citizens, and wasn't intended to apply to illegal immigrants' kids. But the pro-immigration Immigration Policy Center offers a rebuttal, with scholar Elizabeth Wydra citing the "clear intent of the Reconstruction framers to grant U.S. citizenship based on the objective measure of U.S. birth rather than subjective political or public opinion."

Published in the San Francisco Chronicle

Employment Authorization and Asylum: Strategies to Avoid Stopping the Asylum Clock

The American Immigration Council’s Practice Advisory, Employment Authorization and Asylum: Strategies to Avoid Stopping the Asylum Clock, has been updated to reflect extensive changes to the manner in which the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) and the Executive Office for Immigration Review (EOIR) determine an asylum applicant’s eligibility for an Employment Authorization Document (EAD).

For more information, please visit our asylum clock litigation page and read the updated FAQ on the benefits provided under the settlement agreement of the nationwide class action, ABT. v. USCIS, which challenged policies related to employment authorization for asylum applicants.

Published On: Wednesday, February 5, 2014 | Download File

No Pretty Pictures by Anita Lobel

Illustrated with her family photographs, and written in a straightforward prose, No Pretty Pictures offers valuable lessons on the Holocaust and survival for adolescent readers. In this lesson, students will read, reflect and use maps and text to study the "push-pull factors" of the immigrant experience.

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Arizona teen pursues education in friendlier state

Published on Tue, Sep 07, 2010

According to the Immigration Policy Center in Washington, D.C., the DREAM Act, sponsored by Sens. Dick Durbin, D-Ill., and Richard Lugar, R-Ind., would allow "current, former and future undocumented high school graduates and GED recipients a pathway to U.S. citizenship through college or the armed services." This means that people like Alberto would be awarded a conditional lawful permanent resident status for six years, during which time they would have to complete two years of higher education or military service, although they would not be eligible for federal education grants.

Published in the Santa Fe New Mexican

VAWA

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Working with partner non-profits, the LAC convinced USCIS to adopt a policy that allows VAWA applicants to apply for adjustment of status under INA § 245(a) even if the applicant is present in the U.S. without inspection and admission or parole. This policy favorably impacts thousands of battered immigrants.