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Immigrant Entrepreneurs: Creating Jobs and Strengthening the U.S. Economy

Published on Wed, Jan 25, 2012

WASHINGTON, D.C— Immigrant entrepreneurs create jobs and strengthen the economy, and the U.S. should tailor immigration laws and policies to encourage the best and the brightest to create businesses on U.S. soil, according to a new joint report issued today by the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and the Immigration Policy Center (IPC).

The report, Immigrant Entrepreneurs: Creating Jobs and Strengthening the U.S. Economy examines immigrant entrepreneurship in many different sectors, including neighborhood, growth, transnational, and science and technology firms, and demonstrates how these immigrant businesses create jobs for U.S. workers and contribute to America’s economic growth.

“Immigrant-owned growth businesses are hugely important to strengthening local economies, as well as providing jobs essential to economic recovery,” said report author Marcia Drew Hohn, director of the Public Education Institute at The Immigrant Learning Center, Inc. “The U.S. Small Business Association estimates that small businesses have generated 64% of the net new jobs over the past 15 years and credits immigrant businesses with a significant contribution to this job growth.”

“Regardless of one’s school of thought, there is very little disagreement among researchers and experts that immigrant entrepreneurship is a powerful and valuable asset to America’s economic future,” said Benjamin Johnson, executive director of the American Immigration Council. “There has been a lot of attention paid to the high tech, highly educated immigrant entrepreneur, this report reinforces that it is less about your degree or the product you produce, and far more about recognizing a need in your community and having the skills and commitment to bring a dream to life.”Read more...

Published in the Journal News Service

The LAC Docket | Volume I, Issue 2

The Newsletter of the American Immigration Council’s Legal Action Center

March 1, 2011
Our Work | Requests for Evidence | Quick Links | Donate

OUR WORK

Access to Courts

Federal appeals court rejects jurisdictional bar to post-departure motions to reopen
Pruidze v. Holder, No. 09-3836 (6th Cir. 2011)

In early February, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit rejected the government’s long-held position that immigration courts lack “jurisdiction” to consider motions to reopen filed by noncitizens who have already left the country. The unanimous decision agrees with the position of the Legal Action Center (LAC) and the National Immigration Project of the National Lawyers Guild (NIP), which contended in an amicus brief that the decades-old regulation underlying the government’s argument has been superseded by more recent changes to the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA). (See press release.) The Sixth Circuit thus became the fourth court to strike down or question the validity of the regulation, which only the Tenth Circuit has expressly found to be consistent with the motion to reopen statute.Read more...

Mark Cangemi, 9/11 Investigator, Adopts Immigrant Teen's Cause

Published on Mon, Apr 23, 2012

WOODBURY, Minn. — When a teenage boy sits down to dinner with his girlfriend's father, he's bound to feel intimidated. That's particularly the case if the boy came to the United States illegally and the dad is a former Immigration and Customs Enforcement agent who spent three decades apprehending violators of immigration laws. But for Alan, the captain of his high school football team and an honor student, it's like eating with family. That's because the immigration special agent who ordered the arrest of convicted Sept. 11 hijacker Zacarias Moussaoui, has taken up a new cause. Mark Cangemi is trying to help the teenager stay in the country. Read more...

Published in the Minnesota Public Radio

2012 Creative Writing Contest Honorable Mention

Working Toward a Dream

By: Aedra Li

San Francisco, CA


I remember being confused, so many why’s and not enough because’s. Why did we leave Saulita? Where were we going? My parents didn’t say a word to me or my brother. All they said was, “We are going to a better place. You will understand later.” Was a twelve year old girl too young to know the truth? If I got a penny for every question I had, I’d be a millionaire. Then I’d have enough money to go back to Saulita and see my bestfriend, Pablo.

 

During one part of the trip, my brother and I had to hide under a blanket. We heard a gringo speaking, but we couldn’t understand him through the blanket. He asked a lot of questions. After three days, we finally stopped driving. We got out, stretched our aching legs, and looked cautiously around. We saw many other immigrants working in the fields, picking strawberries. In front of us was a house that you could tell used to be white, but was now an ugly cream. It used to be a single-family house, but now it housed for families of five. Everyone that lived in that house had to work in the fields to live there and put food in their families’ mouths. We worked 15 hours a day under the hot California sun. All of our backs ached, all of our hands turned ugly with calluses. As the seasons changed, we moved from farm to farm, but the work was the same. We worked for six hard, intense years harvesting crops that would feed the lucky people who didn’t have to work like us.

 Read more...

Congressman Barletta challenges President Obama over immigration order

Published on Tue, Jul 03, 2012

IPC staff lawyer Ben Winograd was quoted in a story about the legality of the Obama Administration's deferred action memo: Read more...

Published in the The Morning Call

Jhoon Rhee

The Father of American Tae Kwon Do

Grandmaster Jhoon Rhee, a 10th Degree Black Belt, is considered the "Father of American Tae Kwon Do." Grandmaster Rhee's first trip to America was on June 1, 1956, for a short military training program soon after the Korean War. In 1957, he returned as a freshman to Southwest Texas State Teachers College in San Marcos, Texas with $46 in his pocket. English was his biggest obstacle. It took him half an hour to read a single page. Through perseverance and discipline, Grandmaster Rhee has become one of the most prominent motivational public speakers in the world today, encouraging individuals to achieve self-discipline, self-esteem and self-defense through the development of academic, moral, and physical excellence.

Grandmaster Jhoon Rhee has been involved in every aspect of Tae Kwon Do. He has opened schools in order to teach not only the physical techniques of Tae Kwon Do, but the inseparable mental aspects, as well. His Martial Arts philosophy calls for building true confidence through knowledge in the mind, honesty in the heart, and strength in the body. His philosophy and seminars center around rediscovering the vision of America's Founding Fathers by restoring mental discipline in America and in the world.Read more...

AIC Executive Director Ben Johnson Published in The Hill

Published on Tue, Feb 05, 2013

The American Immigration Council's Executive Director Ben Johnson wrote this Op-Ed for The Hill's Congress Blog, focusing on the problems with border security in the Immigration Reform debate.

"The recent immigration-reform proposals unveiled by President Obama and a bipartisan group of Senators are very much in accord when it comes to general principles. Both proposals advocate smarter and more effective immigration-enforcement measures at the border and in the interior of the country. Both stress the creation of a pathway to legal status and eventual U.S. citizenship for the nation’s 11 million unauthorized immigrants, as well as reforming the way we treat the best and the brightest who come here from around the world. And both call for reforms in the family-based and employment-based immigration systems to reduce backlogs and make limits on future flows more flexible. However, there are significant differences in the specifics of each proposal, particularly those having to do with immigration enforcement."

Published in the The Hill

Natasha Iskander

Natasha Iskander, Assistant Professor of Public Policy at New York University’s Wagner School of Public Service, conducts research on labor migration and its relationship to economic development; labor mobilization and its relationship to workforce development; and processes of institutional innovation and organizational learning. Her work examines how the dislocations caused by migration provide opportunities for knowledge creation and economic development.

 

Huffington Post Arcticle Shines Spotlight on AIC

Published on Mon, Aug 05, 2013

In a recent article in the Huffington Post, Judy Rickard, who wrote the IPC publication, "Passport Pages Tell Our Tale," highlighted a report by the AIC.  The article, titled, "The Glass Wall That Divides Us," cites the IPC on the demographics of immigrants in the United States.

"Information from American Immigration Council shows that immigration (documented and undocumented) includes the following cultural and ethnic groups in these proportions:

Fewer than one-third (29 percent) of immigrants in the United States are from Mexico. Roughly 28 percent are from Asia, 24 percent from countries in Latin America and the Caribbean other than Mexico, 12 percent from Europe, and 4 percent from Africa. Moreover, contrary to some popular misconceptions, most Latinos in the United States (63 percent) are native-born -- not immigrants. And 29 percent of foreign-born Latinos are naturalized U.S. citizens."

Published in the Huffington Post

Gifts of Stock

 

 

Donating stock to the American Immigration Council is a great alternative to cash. Instead of selling it and letting Uncle Sam enjoy the benefits of the gain, donate the stock to the Council and enjoy the tax savings of the charitable donation yourself.

When donating appreciated stock to a charitable organization like the American Immigration Council you do not have to recognize the gain. It’s a win-win situation: you are able to make a charitable contribution toward the Council’s mission and avoid tax on the appreciation in value of the stock.

If you would like to make a donation of securities to the Council, please follow the instructions below.

Electronic Transfer for Stocks and Bonds to electronically transfer stocks and bonds to the American Immigration Council

1) Please direct your broker to transfer your securities to the following account:

DTC instructions:

Firm Name: First Clearing, LLCRead more...