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Jhoon Rhee

The Father of American Tae Kwon Do

Grandmaster Jhoon Rhee, a 10th Degree Black Belt, is considered the "Father of American Tae Kwon Do." Grandmaster Rhee's first trip to America was on June 1, 1956, for a short military training program soon after the Korean War. In 1957, he returned as a freshman to Southwest Texas State Teachers College in San Marcos, Texas with $46 in his pocket. English was his biggest obstacle. It took him half an hour to read a single page. Through perseverance and discipline, Grandmaster Rhee has become one of the most prominent motivational public speakers in the world today, encouraging individuals to achieve self-discipline, self-esteem and self-defense through the development of academic, moral, and physical excellence.

Grandmaster Jhoon Rhee has been involved in every aspect of Tae Kwon Do. He has opened schools in order to teach not only the physical techniques of Tae Kwon Do, but the inseparable mental aspects, as well. His Martial Arts philosophy calls for building true confidence through knowledge in the mind, honesty in the heart, and strength in the body. His philosophy and seminars center around rediscovering the vision of America's Founding Fathers by restoring mental discipline in America and in the world.Read more...

AIC Executive Director Ben Johnson Published in The Hill

Published on Tue, Feb 05, 2013

The American Immigration Council's Executive Director Ben Johnson wrote this Op-Ed for The Hill's Congress Blog, focusing on the problems with border security in the Immigration Reform debate.

"The recent immigration-reform proposals unveiled by President Obama and a bipartisan group of Senators are very much in accord when it comes to general principles. Both proposals advocate smarter and more effective immigration-enforcement measures at the border and in the interior of the country. Both stress the creation of a pathway to legal status and eventual U.S. citizenship for the nation’s 11 million unauthorized immigrants, as well as reforming the way we treat the best and the brightest who come here from around the world. And both call for reforms in the family-based and employment-based immigration systems to reduce backlogs and make limits on future flows more flexible. However, there are significant differences in the specifics of each proposal, particularly those having to do with immigration enforcement."

Published in the The Hill

Natasha Iskander

Natasha Iskander, Assistant Professor of Public Policy at New York University’s Wagner School of Public Service, conducts research on labor migration and its relationship to economic development; labor mobilization and its relationship to workforce development; and processes of institutional innovation and organizational learning. Her work examines how the dislocations caused by migration provide opportunities for knowledge creation and economic development.

 

Huffington Post Arcticle Shines Spotlight on AIC

Published on Mon, Aug 05, 2013

In a recent article in the Huffington Post, Judy Rickard, who wrote the IPC publication, "Passport Pages Tell Our Tale," highlighted a report by the AIC.  The article, titled, "The Glass Wall That Divides Us," cites the IPC on the demographics of immigrants in the United States.

"Information from American Immigration Council shows that immigration (documented and undocumented) includes the following cultural and ethnic groups in these proportions:

Fewer than one-third (29 percent) of immigrants in the United States are from Mexico. Roughly 28 percent are from Asia, 24 percent from countries in Latin America and the Caribbean other than Mexico, 12 percent from Europe, and 4 percent from Africa. Moreover, contrary to some popular misconceptions, most Latinos in the United States (63 percent) are native-born -- not immigrants. And 29 percent of foreign-born Latinos are naturalized U.S. citizens."

Published in the Huffington Post

Gifts of Stock

 

 

Donating stock to the American Immigration Council is a great alternative to cash. Instead of selling it and letting Uncle Sam enjoy the benefits of the gain, donate the stock to the Council and enjoy the tax savings of the charitable donation yourself.

When donating appreciated stock to a charitable organization like the American Immigration Council you do not have to recognize the gain. It’s a win-win situation: you are able to make a charitable contribution toward the Council’s mission and avoid tax on the appreciation in value of the stock.

If you would like to make a donation of securities to the Council, please follow the instructions below.

Electronic Transfer for Stocks and Bonds to electronically transfer stocks and bonds to the American Immigration Council

1) Please direct your broker to transfer your securities to the following account:

DTC instructions:

Firm Name: First Clearing, LLCRead more...

IPC Director Mary Giovagnoli Quoted in The Fiscal Times

Published on Tue, Apr 08, 2014

IPC Director Mary Giovagnoli was recently quoted in The Fiscal Times article "A Republican Path to Citizenship – Via Boot Camp". The article covers Rep. Jeff Denham's (R-CA) ENLIST Act, which would allow undocumented immigrants to become legal permanent residents upon service in the U.S. military

“It’s not surprising that Republicans would dip their toes in the water with these types of bills,” said Mary Giavagnoli, director of the Immigration Policy Center at the American Immigration Council. “There’s overall consensus that people are who are willing to serve their country should be able to have the benefits of citizenship.”

Published in the The Fiscal Times

Lisa S. Roney

Lisa S. Roney retired in 2009 as Director of the Research and Evaluation Division of the Office of Policy and Strategy at U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) following 39 years as a policy analyst and manager with USCIS and the legacy Immigration and Naturalization Service.  She served on the staff of the Interagency Task Force on Immigration Law and Policy and was a Senior Research Associate with the Select Commission on Immigration and Refugee Policy. She was responsible for monitoring and reporting on implementation of the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986 and research on the legalized immigrant population.  She is currently an independent immigration consultant working with Westat on evaluation of electronic employment verification programs. She received a B.A. from Hood College and an M.P.A. from American University.

 

IPC Lauds Obama Administration for Beginning Immigration Reform Discussion

Released on Tue, Jun 23, 2009

Tomorrow, President Obama and Congressional leaders will meet to chart a roadmap designed to move comprehensive immigration reform forward in 2009. The President has already begun solving our nation's toughest problems and has promised to tackle our broken immigration system in his first year in office. Leaders in Congress are also committed to moving immigration reform this year and their efforts are buoyed by a groundswell of support from the majority of Americans who want immigration reform.

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Immigration in Kentucky

Experts' Comments Slam E-Verify Program

Released on Sun, Aug 10, 2008

Final comments are due today on a rule that would make E-Verify mandatory for approximately 200,000 public and private federal government contractors and their 4 million employees.

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