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To halt cartels, block cash flow

Published on Thu, Feb 09, 2012

 

If you want to stop a monster, cut off its head. Simple logic.

If you want a secure the border, go after the crime syndicates that routinely penetrate our southern border for their own nefarious purposes. Go after the leaders of the Mexican cartels. Go after their money.

The minions of these sophisticated international criminal organizations smuggle in drugs and people at will. They take back tens of billions of dollars in dirty profits. We put manpower and technology on the border. They find ways around it.

They take their profits out in shrink-wrapped bundles of hundred-dollar bills. Electronic transfers. Money schemes. Prepaid value cards that can store and transport money.

Joaquin "Chapo" Guzman, leader of the Sinaloa cartel, regularly appears on Forbes list of the world's wealthiest people.

"If U.S. forces can find Osama bin Laden, I am sure, with Mexican help, they can find and arrest Chapo," former Arizona Attorney General Terry Goddard wrote in an article for the Immigration Policy Center. "That arrest would do more to stop the flow of contraband into the U.S. and the slaughter in Mexico than all the billions spent so far."

Through the Merida Initiative, the U.S. has provided money and expertise to Mexico to fight the cartels, but time is not on our side if we hope to engage in a more vigorous assault on these criminal gangs that breach our borders. Mexican President Felipe Calderon, who runs an aggressive campaign against the cartels, will leave office in December. He cannot run in Mexico's July presidential election. His successor may take a more conciliatory approach to the cartels. Mexico is weary of a drug war that has cost more than 47,000 lives in the past five years.

Instead of discussing the cartel threat, the U.S. has been focusing on fences, immigration sweeps and deportations. These are politically popular responses that do not weaken criminal organizations in Mexico.Read more...

Published in the The Arizona Republic

Institute & Meetings (2011 Litigation Meeting)

Litigation Meeting Materials

Folder Materials

How do we stop states and localities from adopting and enforcing local immigration measures? (Arizona copycat bills)

Prolonged detention/detention conditions

Outline of questions for discussion in the detention small group session

1. Larger perspective discussionRead more...

Most ‘illegals' are are here to stay

Published on Mon, Apr 30, 2012

We are not sure how it would help the United States to see the exodus of millions of taxpayers with homes, cars, children and jobs. Yet, the hope for a mass exodus of people who fit that description is part of what inspired new immigration-enforcement laws in Arizona, Utah, Oklahoma, Georgia, South Carolina and Alabama.

Best estimates say that roughly 11 million residents of the United States live here illegally. Some came here by getting away with misdemeanor border crossings. Others overstayed visas. Regardless, illegal residency is not a crime. It is a non-criminal, civil dispute with government.

Read more...

Published in the Colorado Springs Gazette

Educator Workshops

The Community Education Center offers day-long Education Workshops to youth, educators and community leaders who are interested in integrating the subject of immigration into their communities, professional and educational spheres.

Upcoming Workshops and Conferences

TESOL International Convention and English Language Learning Expo

April 5-8, 2016

Baltimore Convention Center
One West Pratt Street
Baltimore, Maryland 21201

Details for the following sessions are forthcoming:

  • “Immigration 101”
  • “Crossing Borders with Digital Storytelling"

 To register for the conference, please click here.

National Council for Social Studies Annual Conference (NCSS)

November 13-15, 2015 

95th NCSS Annual Conference
New Orleans Ernest N. Morial Convention Center
900 Convention Center Blvd.
New Orleans, LA

The American Immigration Council will be presenting at the National Council of Social Studies (NCSS) Conference in New Orleans – and if you’re attending, we hope to meet you at one of our sessions. Read more...

Minnesota's Latino students weigh chance to study, work without deportation fears

Published on Mon, Aug 13, 2012

Twin Cities Pioneer Press article, "Minnesota's Latino students weigh chance to study, work without deportation fears," cites IPC's study (Who and Where the DREAMers Are), which states that more than 9,000 immigrants living in Minnesota could benefit from President Obama's deferred action: Read more...

Published in the Twin Cities Pioneer Press

Roman Totenberg

Professor Emeritus of Music at Boston University

Across the continents and the span of seven decades, violinist Roman Totenberg has been singled out by critics as an outstanding violinist, a sensitive musician and a brilliant teacher. Roman Totenberg was born in Poland in 1911 and made his debut with the Warsaw Philharmonic when he was 11 years old. Soon after his Berlin debut, he was performing with every major European orchestra, making recordings and eventually playing with major orchestras in the United States, at the White House and the Library of Congress. His work as a chamber music performer was widely acclaimed when he played regularly with the New Friends of Music in New York and in 1940 when he became Director of live chamber music concerts for New York radio station WQXR. As a young artist he toured South America with Arthur Rubinstein and met composer Darius Milhaud after Totenberg's Paris debut which Milhaud had reviewed. More than two decades later, Totenberg, with the composer conducting, would play a premiere performance of Milhaud's 2nd Violin Concerto in Aspen, Colorado and in Berlin with the Berlin Philharmonic. These concerts were among a number of first performances of composers' works that Totenberg would play over the years.

Totenberg continues performing as a soloist with orchestra in recital and in chamber music concerts. As his reputation for concert performances has grown, so too has his reputation for fine teaching and musical expertise. In 1983, he was named Artist Teacher of the Year by the American String Teachers Association. Currently teaching at Boston University, he headed the String Department there from 1961 to 1978. He taught at the Mannes School of Music in New York, headed the string department of the Peabody Conservatory of Music, Baltimore, and the Longy School of Music which he was the Director from 1978 to 1985.Read more...

The IPC's Mary Giovagnoli in Talking Points Memo

Published on Wed, Apr 24, 2013

Mary Giovagnoli, the Director of the IPC, was quoted in a Talking Points Memo article discussing the effect that the Boston marathon bombing would have on the current immigration debate:

"Mary Giovagnoli, director of the Immigration Policy Center and a former immigration adviser to the late Sen. Ted Kennedy (D-MA), told TPM that she saw nothing in the law that would affect the screening side of the process. She noted that procedures had been tightened significantly over the last decade already, especially in regards to “high risk” countries.

“The changes are not changes that implicate national security or have any connection to Boston,” she said."

Published in the Talking Points Memo

Jennifer Lynch, Esq.

Jennifer Lynch, Esq. is a staff attorney with the Electronic Frontier Foundation and works on open government, transparency and privacy issues as part of EFF’s FOIA Litigation for Accountable Government (FLAG) Project. In addition to government transparency, Jennifer has written and spoken frequently on government surveillance programs, intelligence community misconduct, and biometrics collection. Prior to joining EFF, Jennifer was the Clinical Teaching Fellow with the Samuelson Law, Technology & Public Policy Clinic at UC Berkeley School of Law. She has published academically on identity theft and phishing attacks and sovereign immunity in civil rights cases.

IPC Cited in USA Today

Published on Tue, Sep 24, 2013

The Immigration Policy Center was cited in a recent USA Today article titled, "Temporary Visa Opens Up World for Young Immigrant."  The article, focusing on Iowa DACA recipient Eren Sanchez, mentions the IPC's oft-cited number of potentially eligible DACA recipients.

"Sanchez, 24, is among the more than 565,000 young immigrants in the U.S. who have received two-year visas in the past year. The permits are offered under a year-old federal program for people ages 15 to 30 who have grown up in the U.S., but arrived illegally in the country as children.

Under the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals policy put in place in August 2012 by the Obama administration, about 950,000 immigrants nationwide were eligible for the visas, according to an estimate from the Immigration Policy Center in Washington, D.C."

Published in the USA Today

American Immigration Council's Yearly Top Accomplishments

Scroll down to learn more about the accomplishments that we are most proud of for each year.

 

2011Read more...