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Undocumented Immigrants Facing Deportation: Caught Up In Confusion, Lost Records, Inconsistent Policy Enforcement And Difficult Choices

Published on Fri, Nov 18, 2011

PLANO, Texas -- The worst shock of Maria Navarro's life came, fittingly, on Halloween. Weeks later, she still is afraid, asking that her real name not be used, recounting her story over the phone and hiding out with her three U.S.-born children at the home of relatives.

In the pre-dawn, federal agents arrested Navaro's husband, Ramiro, as he made his way to his plumbing job. Within hours, he had been deported. He broke the news to his wife over the phone from his hometown in north-central Mexico's Guanajuato state.

"He is disillusioned," she said. "He spent the last 20 years in the United States. He made his life here. This is where his children were born."

Ramiro's is just one case in the record number of undocumented immigrants being deported by the Obama administration -- nearly 400,000 in the last fiscal year. Many are whisked quickly across the border. Increasingly, they're deported without speaking to a lawyer or having a proper hearing, according to a recent report from the National Immigration Law Center, a Los Angeles-based advocacy group.

An official at the Mexican Consulate and a spokesman for the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement office in Dallas said they found no record of the immigration raid that netted Ramiro and seven other men on Oct. 31.

Roberto Nicolas, the consular official, said in an email it was "not a common practice for deportations to occur on the same day."

Carl Rusnok, an ICE spokesman in Dallas, also wrote in an email that he "did not find any information regarding these actions taken in that location that day."

Immigration attorney Kathleen Walker believes that Navarro may have been swept up in a little-known federal program called "stipulated removal."Read more...

Published in the The Huffington Post

IEC News Room

Quick Fact: Immigrants found large percentage of science and technology firms

Immigrant entrepreneurs have founded or co-founded 25.3% of all science and technology firms in the United States.

Immigration policy to see a big change

Published on Sat, Jan 07, 2012

New York Immigration Achievement Awards

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In D.C., a Push to Aid Irish Migrants

Published on Wed, Mar 21, 2012

WASHINGTON - Congress may have finally found an immigration issue it can agree on in an election year: letting in more Irish people.

At a time when the volatile issue of comprehensive immigration reform is hopelessly stalled in a divided Congress, senators of both parties are rallying behind legislation that would allow 10,500 Irish nationals to come to the U.S. to work each year.

The legislation by Sen. Scott Brown, R-Mass., has been attacked by critics as a cynical ploy to win Irish-American votes as Brown battles for re-election in a state where one in four residents is of Irish descent. It also has been decried by both pro-immigration and anti-immigration groups as an example of favoritism toward European immigrants over Hispanics and Asians.

But supporters of the bill, including Democratic Sen. Charles Schumer of New York, say they are trying to help reverse discrimination against Irish nationals that was inadvertently created by a 1965 overhaul of the U.S. immigration system.

That overhaul, designed to end a bias against immigrants from Latin America, Asia and Africa, made it difficult for Irish immigrants to obtain visas despite their strong cultural ties to the U.S., say supporters of Brown's bill. Hispanics and Asians have been the dominant immigrant groups to the U.S. since 1965 and, as they become citizens, their close family members have been given priority for U.S. visas as part of the U.S. government's emphasis on family reunification.

About 40 million Americans identify themselves as being of Irish descent, or about 13 percent of the U.S. population of more than 313 million. Hispanics make up about 16 percent of U.S. residents. The number of Irish immigrants granted permanent legal status in the U.S. has plunged from nearly 38,000 in the 1960s to about 16,000 in the 10 years from 2000 through 2009.Read more...

Published in the The Arizona Republic

The LAC Docket

The LAC Docket is the newsletter of the American Immigration Council's Legal Action Center. To view individual editions of the newsletter, please click the links below. Archives of our former newsletter -- the Litigation Clearinghouse Newsletter -- can be found here.

The LAC Docket l Volume V, Issue 1 (February 2, 2015)

This issue of the Docket highlights the Council’s availability to co-counsel federal court actions challenging USCIS denials of H-1B, L-1A and L-1B petitions. The issue also describes our ongoing work to preserve federal court jurisdiction over visa petition revocation procedures, establish the right to appointed counsel for children in removal proceedings, defend against legal challenges to deferred action, and establish that a grant of TPS benefits constitutes an admission for adjustment of status purposes.

The LAC Docket l Volume IV, Issue 4 (November 4, 2014)

This issue of the Docket highlights our ongoing litigation to establish a right to appointed counsel for children in immigration proceedings, as well as fair procedures for Central American families detained in Artesia, New Mexico. This issue also discusses our work to promote fundamental fairness in PERM adjudications, hold immigration agencies accountable for misconduct, and ensure paths to legal status for eligible immigrants.

The LAC Docket l Volume IV, Issue 3 (June 17, 2014)Read more...

The new meaning of minority in Oregon

Published on Sat, May 26, 2012

Numbers from the IPC State Fact Sheets were used in an editorial written by the Oregonian Editors about the importance of immigrants in their state: Read more...

Published in the The Oregonian

Fundamental Principles of J Sponsorship

PRINCIPLES OF J SPONSORSHIP

We are frequently asked by interested members of the immigration law community what are the basic principles which we use for strategic planning in the development of the International Exchange Center.

Here are the ten principles that guide our planning and decision making: Read more...