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Jhoon Rhee

The Father of American Tae Kwon Do

Grandmaster Jhoon Rhee, a 10th Degree Black Belt, is considered the "Father of American Tae Kwon Do." Grandmaster Rhee's first trip to America was on June 1, 1956, for a short military training program soon after the Korean War. In 1957, he returned as a freshman to Southwest Texas State Teachers College in San Marcos, Texas with $46 in his pocket. English was his biggest obstacle. It took him half an hour to read a single page. Through perseverance and discipline, Grandmaster Rhee has become one of the most prominent motivational public speakers in the world today, encouraging individuals to achieve self-discipline, self-esteem and self-defense through the development of academic, moral, and physical excellence.

Grandmaster Jhoon Rhee has been involved in every aspect of Tae Kwon Do. He has opened schools in order to teach not only the physical techniques of Tae Kwon Do, but the inseparable mental aspects, as well. His Martial Arts philosophy calls for building true confidence through knowledge in the mind, honesty in the heart, and strength in the body. His philosophy and seminars center around rediscovering the vision of America's Founding Fathers by restoring mental discipline in America and in the world.Read more...

IPC's Mary Giovagnoli in Chicago Sun-Times

Published on Fri, Nov 29, 2013

Mary Giovagnoli, the Director of the Immigration Policy Center, was quoted in a recent Chicago Sun-Times article titled, "Keeping Immigration Reform Alive."

"“We are going to see it in 2014, a carefully orchestrated dance toward reform,” said Mary Giovagnoli, director of the Washington, D.C.-based Immigration Policy Center. Politicians will have “breathing room after the primaries. We still have a chance at something decent.”

A path to citizenship for undocumented immigrants is a sticking point for Republicans, understandably since the party already has sent alienated Latino voters fleeing to the open arms of Democrats.

A New York Times article last week pointed out that for many, being able to drive and work legally in the U.S. is a bigger priority than citizenship. “What they really care about is a solution that allows them to overcome their greatest vulnerabilities,” Oscar A. Chacon, executive director of the National Alliance of Latin American and Caribbean Communities, told the Times.

Yet, withholding citizenship wouldn’t stand the test of time. As Benito of ICIRR and Giovagnoli noted, such a move would create an official second-class form of residency that runs contrary to the principles of a proud, democratic country."

Published in the Chicago Sun-Times

Natasha Iskander

Natasha Iskander, Assistant Professor of Public Policy at New York University’s Wagner School of Public Service, conducts research on labor migration and its relationship to economic development; labor mobilization and its relationship to workforce development; and processes of institutional innovation and organizational learning. Her work examines how the dislocations caused by migration provide opportunities for knowledge creation and economic development.

 

DHS Announces Changes In Worksite Enforcement Policies

Released on Wed, Apr 29, 2009

Today the Department of Homeland Security announced policy changes around worksite immigration enforcement. The Immigration Policy Center (IPC) issued a statement.

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Gifts of Stock

 

 

Donating stock to the American Immigration Council is a great alternative to cash. Instead of selling it and letting Uncle Sam enjoy the benefits of the gain, donate the stock to the Council and enjoy the tax savings of the charitable donation yourself.

When donating appreciated stock to a charitable organization like the American Immigration Council you do not have to recognize the gain. It’s a win-win situation: you are able to make a charitable contribution toward the Council’s mission and avoid tax on the appreciation in value of the stock.

If you would like to make a donation of securities to the Council, please follow the instructions below.

Electronic Transfer for Stocks and Bonds to electronically transfer stocks and bonds to the American Immigration Council

1) Please direct your broker to transfer your securities to the following account:

DTC instructions:

Firm Name: Wells Fargo AdvisorsRead more...

U.S. Economy Still Needs Highly Skilled Foreign Workers

Released on Mon, Jun 30, 2008

Although the recent downturn of the U.S. economy has caused unemployment to rise in some industries, like construction, it has done little to dampen the perennially strong demand for skilled workers in high-tech companies, universities, and research institutes.

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Jack Strauss, Ph.D.

Professor Jack Strauss is the Simon Chair of Economics at Saint Louis University and Director of the Simon Center for Regional Forecasting. He is currently an adviser to the St. Louis Steering Committee on Immigration. The taskforce, backed by both Mayor Slay and County Executive Dooley, is exploring avenues to promote a more proactive and friendly immigration policy in the St. Louis region. Dr. Strauss was the keynote speaker at the conference that kick-started the immigration taskforce, and his paper has shown that immigration can produce significant positive economic effects to the St. Louis region. He is the author of more than three dozen refereed articles in economics in top journals.

 

 

The Bay State's New Senator Gains Diverse Constituents

Released on Wed, Jan 20, 2010

Massachusetts Senator-Elect Scott Brown will shortly step into the Senate seat held for nearly half a century by one of the most loyal champions of immigrants to ever sit in Congress. Because of that history, Bay Staters have come to expect that their Senators will understand the important contributions of immigrants to the growth and well-being of their state.  Regardless of politics or ideology, as the new Senator gets down to the business of representing his entire state, understanding the significant role of immigrants will become essential. 

Of all the New England states, Senator Brown's immigrant and new American constituents are  perhaps the most diverse and numerous, continuing the tradition of generations of immigrants who helped build Massachusetts. The Immigration Policy Center has compiled research that shows immigrants, Latinos, and Asians are a political and economic powerhouse in Massachusetts, contributing billions to the state economy, and are part of the very economic engine that keeps the Bay State running strong.

IPC research finds: Read more...

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DREAM Act Coming to the Senate Floor

Senator Reid to Attach Act to Defense Authorization Bill

Released on Wed, Sep 15, 2010

Washington, D.C. - Yesterday, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid announced that he would attach the Development, Relief, and Education for Alien Minors (DREAM) Act to the Department of Defense authorization bill expected to come before the Senate as early as next week. The vote will be an important test of whether Congress can transcend partisan politics and work together on crafting solutions to the broken immigration system that both Democrats and Republicans acknowledge is in desperate need of reform. That the proposal will be considered as an amendment to the Defense Authorization bill is appropriate, given the Department of Defense's support for DREAM Act as a way to improve military readiness. 

First introduced in 2001, the DREAM Act would address the plight of young immigrants who have been raised in the U.S. and managed to succeed despite the challenges of being brought to the U.S. without proper documentation. The proposal would offer a path to legal status to those who have graduated from high-school, have stayed out of trouble and plan to attend college or serve in the U.S. military for at least two years.
 
Each year, approximately 65,000 undocumented students graduate from high school, many at the top of their classes, but cannot go to college, join the military, work, or otherwise pursue their dreams. They belong to the 1.5 generation - any (first generation) immigrants brought to the United States at a young age who were largely raised in this country and therefore share much in common with second generation Americans. These students are culturally American, growing up here and often having little attachment to their country of birth. They tend to be bicultural and fluent in English.
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