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The LAC Docket | Volume I, Issue 3

The Newsletter of the American Immigration Council’s Legal Action Center

June 3, 2011
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OUR WORK

Enforcement

Obama Administration urged to exercise prosecutorial discretion in compelling cases

Frustrated by Congress’ failure to enact comprehensive reform, immigration advocates have increasingly advocated for a robust prosecutorial discretion policy that encourages immigration officers to grant relief from deportation in compelling cases. In a letter to DHS Secretary Janet Napolitano in early April, the American Immigration Council and the American Immigration Lawyers Association (AILA) asked the Department of Homeland Security to offer written guidance setting forth detailed criteria on the favorable exercise of prosecutorial discretion. A subsequent legal memorandum released by the Immigration Council and co-signed by two general counsels of the former Immigration and Naturalization Service outlined specific steps the Administration could take to forestall removals in sympathetic cases. Read more...

What happens next in Arizona?

Published on Mon, Jun 25, 2012

IPC staff lawyer Ben Winograd was quoted in a Washington Post blog post covering what the Supreme Court decision will mean in Arizona: Read more...

Published in the The Washington Post

Barbara Murik Chesman

Barbara Murik Chesman was born in the Schlachtenzee Displaced Persons Camp in Berlin, Germany after World War II. Her parents, Abraham and Lisa Murik (nee Davidowicz) both survived the horrors of the Holocaust and emigrated from Germany to the United States in March of 1949.

The family settled here in Washington, DC where Mrs. Chesman attended Wheatley Elementary School, the Hebrew Academy of Washington, and Western High School (now Duke Ellington School for the Performing Arts). She later attended the University of Maryland where she earned a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Government and Politics in May of 1968.

While at college, Mrs. Chesman started working part-time for the Department of State in the Bureau of Consular Affairs for the Passport Office. Following graduation, Mrs. Chesman became a full time employee of the Department of State in August of 1968 in the Office of Passport Services. She met her future husband Bernard Chesman in May of 1971 and they were married June 4, 1972 at Beth Sholom Synagogue in Washington, DC. Immediately following their marriage, they moved to Atlanta Georgia for 7 months, but decided to return to Washington in January 1973 where Mrs. Chesman resumed her career in the Passport Office.

Mrs. Chesman has held many positions in almost every part of the Office of Passport Services but her most notable achievement came in June of 1994, when the Special Issuance Agency (the passport agency which handles all passports for the Federal government) was made a separate entity and she was named Director. Currently, Mrs. Chesman serves in that position today.Read more...

AIC's Wendy Feliz-Sefsaf in Politico

Published on Thu, Jan 03, 2013

Wendy Feliz-Sefsaf, Communications Director at the AIC, was quoted in this article on Politico:

"When the 113th Congress digs into immigration reform with renewed vigor in the new year, no lawmaker will find himself in quite so tight a spot as Rep. Mike Honda.

It’s a position, however, very much relished by Honda, a seven-term Democrat from the San Jose area. His district, California’s redrawn 15th, is among the nation’s most complicated on this hot-button issue — dominated by major high-tech firms focused on importing high-skilled labor as well as huge minority populations seeking paths to citizenship."

Read more here.

 

Published in the Politico

Royce Bernstein Murray, Esq.

Royce Bernstein Murray, Esq. worked for the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and the former Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) for eight years: as Associate Counsel in the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) Office of the Chief Counsel, Refugee and Asylum Law Division from 2003‐2008, and as a Presidential Management Fellow/Asylum Officer in the INS Office of International Affairs from 2000‐2002. At present, Ms. Murray is an adjunct professor of immigration law at the University of the District of Columbia David A. Clarke School of Law and an independent refugee and immigration law consultant. She is a graduate of the Georgetown University Law Center and holds a B.A. with distinction in political science from the University of Michigan.

Wall Street Journal Cites IPC to Refute Rep. Steve King

Published on Fri, Jul 26, 2013

In a recent post in their "Political Diary," the Wall Street Journal cited a recent fact sheet from the IPC's senior researcher, Walter Ewing.  The post, which was refuting Iowa Representative Steve King's recent offensive comments about DREAMers, cited the fact sheet, "From Anecdotes to Evidence: Setting the Record Straight on Immigrants and Crime."

'"For every ethnic group without exception, incarceration rates among young men are lowest for immigrants, even those who are least educated," wrote Mr. Ewing in a 2007 study that he co-authored with Ruben Rumbaut. "This holds true especially for Mexicans, Salvadorans, and Guatemalans who make up the bulk of the undocumented population." By the way, these findings comport with federal and state studies going back a century. If anything, today's immigrants are less likely to be involved in criminal activity than their predecessors.'

Published in the Wall Street Journal

Hiroshi Motomura

Hiroshi Motomura, Susan Westerberg Prager Professor of Law at the UCLA School of Law, is the co‐author of two immigration‐related casebooks: Immigration and Citizenship: Process and Policy (Seventh Edition 2012), and Forced Migration: Law and Policy, published in 2007. The substance of this report is drawn from Hiroshi Motomura, “The Discretion That Matters: Federal Immigration Enforcement, State and Local Arrests, and the Civil–Criminal Line,” UCLA Law Review 58 (2011): 1819‐1858, which cites the relevant sources.

 

IPC's Guillermo Cantor Featured in Voice of America

Published on Thu, Feb 20, 2014

Guillermo Cantor, senior analyst at the Immigration Policy Center, was recently featured in Voice of America's article titled "Experts Debate Economic Impact of US Immigration Reform".

Cantor provided insight on how deportations are impacting immigrant communities and the economic benefits of fixing our nation's broken immigration system.

"Experts said communities paid a heavy price when 11 million undocumented immigrants live in the shadows.  And for a country that prides itself in its humanitarian beliefs - fixing a broken immigration system should be a high priority. 

'I think that each day that Congress delays this decision people are getting hurt, are getting hurt by the deportation machine, that is as I said before, separating families every day,' said Guillermo Cantor, a senior analyst at the Immigration Policy Center.

Cantor said there were other reasons why Congress should act.

'And one of them that sometimes gets overlooked is that it would result in enormous economic benefits for this country,' he said."

Published in the Experts Debate Economic Impact of US Immigration Reform

Contact Us

CONTACT INFORMATION:

The International Exchange Center is located at:

American Immigration Council
International Exchange Center
Suite 200
1331 G Street NW
Washington, D.C. 20005

Email: J1Program@immcouncil.org
Phone: (202) 507-7506


Please email J1Program@immcouncil.org for all J-1 visa related inquiries. Someone will respond to your query within 1-2 business days, or as soon as we are able to obtain information relevant to your issue.

If you need to reach the office by phone, you will be directed to an operator who will direct your call to the appropriate staff member.

Specific staff at the International Exchange Center can be reached at the following telephone numbers and email addresses:

Ms. Moksheda Thapa
Program Specialist
Email: mthapa@immcouncil.org
Phone: (202) 507-7506

If you are a seeking updates regarding the status of a recently submitted application, or information regarding the issuance of a DS 2019 form, please contact one of the Program Specialists with your questions.Read more...

New Americans in the Buckeye State

Released on Sun, Jul 26, 2009

The Immigration Policy Center has compiled research which shows that Ohio's immigrants, Latinos, and Asians are an integral part of the state's economy and tax base. As workers, taxpayers, consumers, and entrepreneurs, immigrants and their children are an economic powerhouse.

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