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Quick Fact: Americans want Reform

67% of voters said “We would be better off if people who are in the United States illegally became legal taxpayers so they pay their fair share,” vs. 28% who said “We would be better off if people who are in the United States illegally left the country because they are taking away jobs that Americans need.”

Copycat immigration enforcement bill dies in Mississippi Senate

Published on Wed, Apr 04, 2012

An immigration enforcement bill that contains the same type of provisions that have Arizona’s S.B. 1070 poised for a Supreme Court hearing died Tuesday in the Mississippi Senate.

Immigration Works, a national organization “advancing immigration reform that works for all Americans – employers, workers and citizens,” said Tuesday in a press release that “Mississippi isn’t the only state to hesitate on immigration this year. Lawmakers across the country are holding off. Some are waiting to see how the U.S. Supreme Court rules in its second immigration federalism case in so many years, U.S. v Arizona.”
The Supreme Court will hear arguments about Arizona’s law, known as S.B. 1070, on April 25.

S.B. 1070 has served as a model for other states and has brought to the forefront questions about how states can enforce existing federal immigration laws.

Immigration Works described “what made the difference in Mississippi”: “Business leaders and law enforcement officials spoke out persuasively, expressing concerns about the consequences of HB 488. The employer coalition that opposed the bill included the Mississippi Farm Bureau, the Mississippi Poultry Association, the state chapter of the Associated Builders and Contractors and several foresting and nursery groups, as well as blueberry and sweet potato growers.” (Read the full press release below.)

The Immigration Policy Center writes that H.B. 488 “would have, among other things, allowed police officers to determine the immigration status of individuals they ‘reasonably suspect’ are in the country without documents. While HB 488 is dead, however, state House members may still be looking to keep these immigration enforcement measures alive by inserting them in other bills.”Read more...

Published in the Florida Independent

Tribute Donations

Remember those people who are or who have influenced your life by paying tribute to them.  A tribute donation to the American Immigration Council provides a meaningful way to remember or recognize those who have made a significant impact on you, your family or your colleagues.

A tribute donation can be made in honor or in memory of someone.  For each tribute, we will notify the honored individual or family of your special gift, keeping the amount confidential. 

You can make a tribute donation online (be sure to fill out “In Honor or In Memory” portion of the form and complete the dedication information) or by completing this form and mailing it to:

 

 American Immigration Council
c/o Megan Hess
1333 G Street, NW
Suite 200
Washington, DC  20005

 

Or you may fax the form to the attention of Megan Hess at (202) 742-5619.

If you have any questions at all regarding giving a contribution to the American Immigration Council, please contact Megan Hess at (202)507-7517 or mhess@immcouncil.org.

Will a new immigration policy get Latinos to the polls?

Published on Fri, Jun 15, 2012

Mary Giovagnoli, director of the IPC, was quoted in a BBC article discussing the Administration's new policy offering deferred action to "DREAMers," young people brought to this country by their parents and fit certain criteria : Read more...

Published in the BBC

International Exchange Center Programs

INTERNATIONAL EXCHANGE CENTER PROGRAMS

The J-1 Visa: Changing America, Changing the World

The Role of the J-1 Trainee/Intern

Interns and Trainees

The Department of State's J-1 Visa Basics


 

THE ROLE OF THE J-1 TRAINEE OR INTERN

Sometimes, it is easy to become confused about the role of the trainee or intern within the host organization.

The trainee/intern’s role is to:

• Learn about the U.S. host organization
• Learn the specific skills and knowledge laid out in the DS-7002 training plan under constant watch of a supervisor
• Gain a new understanding of U.S. culture
• Share their home culture with colleagues and friends

J-1 visa regulations are very specific. A J-1 intern or trainee program should never include more than 20% clerical work or be used in place of regular employment. J-1 trainees and interns are not at will employees.Read more...

Immigrant among first in nation to receive temporary reprieve from deportation

Published on Sat, Nov 03, 2012

IPC statistics were used in this AJC article about Christian Jimenez, one of the first immigrants in the U.S. to receive a reprieve from deportation under Obama's new immigration policy:

Nearly 1 million immigrants across the U.S. are now eligible for deferred action, according to an estimate by the Immigration Policy Center, an arm of the American Immigration Council, an immigrant rights and policy group in Washington. Of those, 24,360 live in Georgia, the eighth-largest total among states.

Published in the The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

Kendell K. Frederick

Army Specialist Kendell K. Frederick was born on August 17, 1984 on the island of Trinidad. There he lived with his grandfather and great grandparents, while his mother Michelle Frederick Murphy migrated to the United States to make a better life for her and her son.

In January 1999, at the age of fifteen, Kendell immigrated to the U.S. to join his mother and family in Randallstown, Maryland. There he was welcomed by his mother, his stepfather Kenmore Murphy, and his two sisters, Kennisha and Kendra. The entire family had looked forward to that day for a very long time.

Kendell attended Old Court Middle School, and upon graduating, attended Randallstown senior High School. There he was introduced to the R.O.T.C. program and decided to give it a try. He loved being in a leadership role, and stayed committed to the R.O.T.C. program for the entire four years.

In 2001, while in his last year of high school, Kendell decided to enlist in the army reserve, and that summer entered basic training at Fort Sill Oklahoma, where he graduated on July 17, 2002.

Upon returning home, Kendell entered Aberdeen and obtained his degree in generator engineering. In February of 2004, he was assigned to the Army reserve's 983rd Engineer Battalion, based in Monclova, Ohio. From there he was deployed to Iraq in December 2004 to work on power generators. His unit, which specializes in construction of roads and infrastructure, depended on him to operate and maintain the portable electrical sources needed to perform their work.Read more...

ABC News-Univision Features IPC's Walter Ewing

Published on Mon, Jul 15, 2013

A recent ABC-Univision article titled "Fact Check:  Is Fear of Immigrant Criminals Overblown?" featured the IPC's Senior Researcher, Walter Ewing.

"'Obviously, dangerous criminals and terrorists must be punished, and immigrants who are dangerous criminals or terrorists should be locked up,' wrote Walter Ewing, a senior researcher at the Immigration Policy Center, in a book devoted to the issue. 'But harsh immigration policies are not effective in fighting crime or terrorism because the overwhelming majority of immigrants are neither criminals nor terrorists.'"

Published in the ABC News-Univision

Hannah Gill, Ph.D.

Hannah Gill, Ph.D. is Research Associate at the Center for Global Initiatives and Assistant Director at the Institute of Latin American Studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Hannah received her doctorate in Social Anthropology with a specialization in Latin American migration from the University of Oxford, England in 2004. She is a native of Alamance County, North Carolina and alumna of UNC Chapel Hill. She is co‐author of the publication, "Going to Carolina de Norte, narrating Mexican migrant experiences” and the author of The Latino Migration Experience in North Carolina, available at UNC Press.

AIC's Benjamin Johnson Responds to Misleading Deportation Data in Washington Times Report

Published on Tue, Apr 01, 2014

Ben Johnson, the Executive Director of the American Immigration Council, responded to the misleading deportation numbers in a recent Washington Times article titled "68,000 Illegal Aliens with Criminal Records Caught and Released".

"The American Immigration Council, though, said the numbers were 'completely misleading' and that many of those ICE agents encountered were likely kicked out of the country even if they weren’t officially put into deportation proceedings.

The AIC said the more than 720,000 immigrants ICE encountered also likely included many legal immigrants whose 'interaction with law enforcement was so minor that they are not even legally subject to removal.'

'CIS is essentially asserting that a legal-permanent resident or a recently naturalized citizen with a broken tail light should be charged by ICE and removed from the country although there is no basis in law for such action,' said Benjamin JohnsonAIC’s executive director."

Published in the Washington Times