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Practice Advisories by Topic

LAC Practice Advisories provide in depth discussion and analysis of select substantive and procedural issues in immigration law. The Practice Advisories are intended to assist lawyers and do not substitute for individual legal advice supplied by a lawyer familiar with a client's case. View advisories by date.

Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) | BIA & Immigration Court Procedures | Business Immigration |
Detention | EnforcementFederal Court Review | FOIA | Immigration Benefits |
Motions to Reopen | Relief from Removal | Voluntary Departure

Administrative Appeals Office (AAO)

Failure to Appeal to the AAO: Does it Bar all Federal Court Review of the Case? (July 22, 2004). This Practice Advisory discusses whether and how a person can get review of a U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services decision in federal court if he or she did not appeal the decision to the Administrative Appeals Office (AAO). The advisory addresses the Supreme Court case Darby v. Cisneros, holding that a plaintiff is not required to exhaust non-mandatory administrative remedies in certain situations, and how it may apply to cases involving appeals to the AAO.Read more...

Congressman Barletta challenges President Obama over immigration order

Published on Tue, Jul 03, 2012

IPC staff lawyer Ben Winograd was quoted in a story about the legality of the Obama Administration's deferred action memo: Read more...

Published in the The Morning Call

Fundamental Principles of J Sponsorship

We are frequently asked by interested members of the immigration law community what are the basic principles which we use for strategic planning in the development of the International Exchange Center.

Here are the ten principles that guide our planning and decision making:

  1. Our primary role is to intercede on behalf of the J participants to ensure their safety and well-being.
  2. The J-2 dependent is as much our program participant as the J-1 trainee or intern.
  3. The J exchange must be mutually beneficial to both the J participant and the American host organization.
  4. The J exchange must foster the exchange of ideas between the international visitor and the American community.
  5. The exchange is not complete until the exchange visitor returns home and shares the experience in the United States with friends, family, and colleagues.
  6. The exchange should foster a deeper understanding of American cultural values for all involved.
  7. As a Designated Sponsor of J exchange, we have an obligation to the U.S. Department of State to know where our J-1 participants are and that they are receiving the training outlined in the approved training plan.
  8. We have an obligation to the U.S. Department of State that our J participants will have experiences that will improve the image and influence of the United States abroad.
  9. We believe that short-term exchange is a powerful tool to demonstrate the value of ideas from around the world to American companies and communities.
  10. We have a responsibility to educate the American immigration law and business communities as to the value and proper use of the J visa.

These ten principles inform all of our program development, communications, and placement decisions. They constitute our recipe for successful intercultural exchange.Read more...

AIC Executive Director Ben Johnson Published in The Hill

Published on Tue, Feb 05, 2013

The American Immigration Council's Executive Director Ben Johnson wrote this Op-Ed for The Hill's Congress Blog, focusing on the problems with border security in the Immigration Reform debate.

"The recent immigration-reform proposals unveiled by President Obama and a bipartisan group of Senators are very much in accord when it comes to general principles. Both proposals advocate smarter and more effective immigration-enforcement measures at the border and in the interior of the country. Both stress the creation of a pathway to legal status and eventual U.S. citizenship for the nation’s 11 million unauthorized immigrants, as well as reforming the way we treat the best and the brightest who come here from around the world. And both call for reforms in the family-based and employment-based immigration systems to reduce backlogs and make limits on future flows more flexible. However, there are significant differences in the specifics of each proposal, particularly those having to do with immigration enforcement."

Published in the The Hill

Ali B. Cambel

Ali B. Cambel was born in Merano, Italy, in 1923 of Turkish parents who were in the diplomatic corps. He is a naturalized U.S. citizen, a member of the Religious Society of Friends, and is a widower.

Mr. Cambel received his early education through home tutoring. He gained admission to Robert Academy, an American prep school and then to Robert College in Istanbul, Turkey where he received his first degree with honors in the humanities and sciences at age nineteen. He pursued graduate work in chemical engineering at the University of Istanbul, naval architecture at M.I.T., and mechanical engineering at CalTech. He holds an M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in mechanical engineering and mathematics from the University of Iowa. He is also a licensed professional engineer.Read more...

Huffington Post Arcticle Shines Spotlight on AIC

Published on Mon, Aug 05, 2013

In a recent article in the Huffington Post, Judy Rickard, who wrote the IPC publication, "Passport Pages Tell Our Tale," highlighted a report by the AIC.  The article, titled, "The Glass Wall That Divides Us," cites the IPC on the demographics of immigrants in the United States.

"Information from American Immigration Council shows that immigration (documented and undocumented) includes the following cultural and ethnic groups in these proportions:

Fewer than one-third (29 percent) of immigrants in the United States are from Mexico. Roughly 28 percent are from Asia, 24 percent from countries in Latin America and the Caribbean other than Mexico, 12 percent from Europe, and 4 percent from Africa. Moreover, contrary to some popular misconceptions, most Latinos in the United States (63 percent) are native-born -- not immigrants. And 29 percent of foreign-born Latinos are naturalized U.S. citizens."

Published in the Huffington Post

Josiah McC. Heyman, Ph.D

Josiah McC. Heyman, Ph.D is Professor of Anthropology and Chair of the Department of Anthropology and Sociology at University of Texas El Paso. His current work addresses border security, including a comprehensive review of U.S. border policies since 9/11. He is also doing research on access and barriers to health care for immigrants, and Latinas/os more generally, in El Paso. Previous work has examined U.S. border enforcement, U.S. border officers, and border communities and cultures. 

IPC Director Mary Giovagnoli Quoted in The Fiscal Times

Published on Tue, Apr 08, 2014

IPC Director Mary Giovagnoli was recently quoted in The Fiscal Times article "A Republican Path to Citizenship – Via Boot Camp". The article covers Rep. Jeff Denham's (R-CA) ENLIST Act, which would allow undocumented immigrants to become legal permanent residents upon service in the U.S. military

“It’s not surprising that Republicans would dip their toes in the water with these types of bills,” said Mary Giavagnoli, director of the Immigration Policy Center at the American Immigration Council. “There’s overall consensus that people are who are willing to serve their country should be able to have the benefits of citizenship.”

Published in the The Fiscal Times

Lynn Tramonte

Lynn Tramonte is the Deputy Director at America’s Voice. She is the organization’s primary liaison to Capitol Hill and policy groups in Washington, DC. Prior to joining America’s Voice, Lynn worked at the National Immigration Forum for eight years doing legislative and communications work. She is a veteran of numerous legislative battles, including the comprehensive immigration reform debates in 2006 and 2007, and led the nationwide campaign to defeat federal legislation that would turn state and local police into immigration agents and undermine community policing. Lynn is a nationally respected advocate, coalition‐builder, and writer.

IPC Praises Labor Leaders' Immigration Accord

Released on Mon, Apr 13, 2009

Today's announcement from the country's most powerful labor federations serves as yet another signal that the momentum for immigration reform is building, and the muscle behind it is growing stronger. We applaud the leaders of the A.F.L.- C.I.O and Change to Win labor federations for providing constructive input and coming together to support a comprehensive solution to our broken immigration system.

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