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Delaware: Immigrant Entrepreneurs, Innovation, and Welcoming Initiatives in the First State

In Delaware, there is no doubt that immigrant entrepreneurs and innovators play an important role. Immigrant entrepreneurs bring in additional revenue, create jobs, and contribute to the state’s economy. Highly skilled immigrants are vital to the state’s innovation industries and to the metropolitan areas within the state, helping to boost local economies. Furthermore, local government, business, and non-profit leaders recognize the importance of immigrants in their communities and support immigration through local “welcoming” and integration initiatives.

Immigrant entrepreneurs contribute to Delaware’s economy.

  • From 2006 to 2010, there were 3,320 new immigrant business owners in Delaware and in 2010, 10.5 percent of all business owners in Delaware were foreign-born.
  • In 2010, new immigrant business owners had a total net business income of $261 million, which is 12.6 percent of all net business income in the state.
  • Delaware is home to many successful companies with at least one founder who was an immigrant or child of an immigrant, including well-known companies such as the chemical giant DuPont, which brought in $39.5 billion in revenue in 2012 and employs 70,000 people worldwide.

Highly skilled immigrants are vital to Delaware’s innovation industries, which in turn helps lead American innovation and creates jobs.Read more...

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Don't Reject. Assimilate!

Published on Thu, May 06, 2010

Here we go again. It seems like an eternity since immigration reform was part of the national dialogue: Back in 2006-2007, George W. Bush was president, and Senator Ted Kennedy was leading the push for a bipartisan immigration reform package in the Senate with the collaboration of Senator John McCain of Arizona. Their proposal ultimately failed, and the 2008 presidential campaign halted all forward movement to reform our outdated immigration system.

Published in the Memphis Flyer

Immigrants & Community

Immigrants & Community teaches middle grade students through literacy-based activities about various types of community and about how immigrants contribute to the communities of which they are a part.

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Experts Find Fault with U.S. Border Strategy

Published on Sat, Jun 12, 2010

Benjamin Johnson, a researcher with the American Immigration Institute, said the immigration debate in the United States has become entirely fixed on the issue of “securing the border.” He cited the recently signed Arizona state law that gave police greater power to enforce federal immigration laws. Fear and uncertainty about the border led to the passage of that law, Johnson insisted.

“This appetite for enforcement at the border seems almost insatiable,” he said. “The focus of legislative efforts and debate seem to always come back to this question of border enforcement.”

Published in the Valley Morning Star (TX)

Federal Court Jurisdiction Over Discretionary Decisions After REAL ID

This Practice Advisory discusses the changes that the REAL ID Act made to INA § 242(a)(2)(B) and outlines an analysis for whether §242(a)(2)(B) applies to a particular case. It also discusses federal court jurisdiction over discretionary decisions after the REAL ID Act in the removal and non-removal contexts.

Published On: Wednesday, April 5, 2006 | Download File

Teaching Tolerance

In this early grades activity, students learn about unfair practices in a simulation exercise and then create plans to stand up against discrimination

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Sex Trafficking of Mentally Disabled Girl Puts Focus on Illegal Immigrants and Crime

Published on Wed, Jul 28, 2010

"Immigrants are less likely to commit crimes than native-born citizens," said Ben Johnson, executive director of the American Immigration Council.

Johnson said the share of immigrants in federal prisons may seem alarming but that only 8 percent of all U.S. prisoners are in such facilities. Most are in state and local prisons, where incarceration rates for immigrants are lower than average.

He also pointed out that many immigrants in the federal system may simply be there because they lack legal immigration status -- not for having committed flagrant criminal offenses.

"No community is immune from the ravages of drugs and sexual violence. But the overwhelming majority of those crimes are not done by immigrants," Johnson said. "We don't ask criminals about their political affiliation or their religion. So why should we focus on their immigration status?"

Published in the ABC News

Inspection and Entry at a Port of Entry: When is there an Admission?

This practice advisory discusses entries in three common situations: where a noncitizen is “waved” through a port of entry with no questions asked; where entry is gained by fraud or misrepresentation; and where there is a false claim to U.S. citizenship.  With respect to each situation, the practice advisory explores whether an “admission” has occurred, the individual’s immigration status upon entry, and the immigration consequences of the action.  It also discusses the impact of these three types of entries on a DACA application.

Published On: Thursday, October 22, 2015 | Download File

How the Film Spare Parts Presents an Opportunity for Educators

The film, “Spare Parts” is both emotionally uplifting and disheartening, and a film that can resonate with the viewer on both these levels is worth watching.  Based on the true story of four undocumented students and their quest to compete in a national robotics championship against the likes of prestigious, well-funded universities such as MIT, the film recounts a compelling tale of the underdog, which is why it made a successful article when it first appeared in Wired magazine in 2005 and a popular book written by the same author, Joshua Davis.  (A book review by us can be found here).  There is something fundamentally relatable about the pursuit of individual dreams and Hollywood capitalized on this phenomenon, while to its credit, showed that part of this dream remains unfulfilled.  Read more...

Year Released: 2015

Automatic citizenship debated

Published on Tue, Aug 10, 2010

The nonpartisan Washington D.C.-based Immigration Policy Center, for instance, says legalizing undocumented workers is the way to go.

On its website, the center says, “Comprehensive immigration reform that includes a path to legalization for undocumented workers would pay for itself through the increased tax revenue it generates, in contrast to the failed and costly enforcement-only policies that have been pursued thus far.”

According to a new report, the center says, immigration reform that includes a legalization program for unauthorized immigrants and enables a future flow of legal workers would result in a big economic benefit.

Published in the Worcester Telegram