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America's new pastime: immigrant-bashing

Published on Wed, Apr 28, 2010

We have always been told that baseball is America's pastime. In fact(after hypocrisy)immigrant-bashing is our new national sport. The draconian anti-immigrant bill recently passed by Arizona's legislature proves just how true this is.

Advocates of this law claim it is necessary to fight crime brought into Arizoma by the "flood" of illegal aliens. In addition, the usual claims of higher unemployment, lower wages and increased welfare spending are cited as reasons for this law.

These claims are largely bogus. A study by Walter Ewing of the Immigration Policy Center shows that if illegals were to suddenly disappear, crime in America would actually increase. Syndicated columnist, Stephen Chapman, notes that El Paso, the ultimate border city, is one of the safest in America.

Published in the Joplin Independent

The Man Behind Arizona’s Immigration Law

Published on Fri, May 07, 2010

When Arizona passed a law that handed local police unprecedented authority to investigate and arrest suspected illegal immigrants, the state ignited a firestorm in a midterm election year. And for Kris Kobach, the former Bush administration lawyer who helped draft the legislation, the crackdown in Arizona is just the beginning.

Published in the Mother Jones

Immigrant Prosecution Program Draws Criticism

Published on Sat, Jun 12, 2010

During a teleconference hosted by the Immigration Policy Center last week, Aarti Kohli, director of immigration policy at the Chief Justice Earl Warren Institute on Race, Ethnicity and Diversity at the Berkeley School of Law, said Operation Streamline is an example of “a misdirected policy.”

Published in the Green Valley News (FL)

Amid Arizona Furor, Reform Debate Simmers

Published on Mon, Jul 26, 2010

"I think that [Arizona's law] has created an imperative for the federal government," to push for the overhaul, said Wendy Sefsaf, communications director at the Immigration Policy Center.

With more than 20 states considering legislation similar to Arizona's law, it would not be in the federal government's interests to challenge each one individually, she said.

Published in the International Business Times

EOIR Background and Security Check Regulations

On April 1, 2005, EOIR’s Background and Security Check regulations went into effect. The interim rule bars IJs and the BIA from granting most forms of relief until DHS has informed them that security checks are completed. This Practice Advisory provides basic information about the requirements and procedures under the interim rule and highlights the major changes to BIA procedures.

Published On: Wednesday, April 6, 2005 | Download File

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The Community Education Center strives to promote a better understanding of immigrants and immigration by providing educational resources

Immigrant vigil stresses necessity of a path to legalization

Published on Wed, Aug 11, 2010

Immigrants aren’t very noticeable in West Virginia, which was 95 percent white in the year 2000, according to the Census. Yet, they’re here. The Immigration Policy Center estimates that the state was home to more than 23,000 immigrants in 2008, and the population is growing. Many of the immigrants are Latino or Asian.  

Published in the West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Advance Parole for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) Recipients

One of the benefits of DACA is that a recipient may seek permission – through a process known as “advance parole” – to travel abroad temporarily for humanitarian, educational, or employment purposes.  This practice advisory provides guidance on advance parole eligibility for DACA recipients; outlines how a DACA recipient may apply for advance parole; addresses the legal issues that can confront a DACA recipient considering travel on advance parole, including any potential risks; and finally, covers the impact that the travel may have on the DACA recipient’s future immigration benefits.

Published On: Wednesday, August 28, 2013 | Download File

Wagner-Rogers Bill Debate

The Wagner-Rogers Bill - Debate lesson allows students to develop and hear the arguments for and against the Wagner-Rogers bill by taking part in a mock Congressional debate on the bill. Students are encouraged to develop and listen to persuasive testimony and speeches, and to come up with creative strategies to change the legislation in ways in which it might be more acceptable.

View File

Poll indicates Latinos alienated by GOP

Published on Wed, Oct 06, 2010

According to the most recent data from the 2010 Census, Latinos make up 11.5 percent of Utah’s population. The Immigration Policy Center revealed 32 percent of immigrants in Utah in 2008 were naturalized citizens who can vote. That number continues to rise.

Published in the Salt Lake City Examiner