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Internet tool helps employers check workers' immigration status

Published on Fri, Apr 02, 2010

You might not realize it when you get a new job, but soon your name may be checked against a government database to answer the question: Are you an illegal immigrant?

Thousands of employers in Florida and tens of thousands nationwide have enrolled in a voluntary government program known as E-Verify, which allows them to find out whether their new hires are entitled to work in the U.S.

Published in the Orlando Sentinel

Immigration in Arizona and Europe

Published on Fri, Apr 30, 2010

Michele Waslin, senior research analyst, American Immigration Council; Washington, D.C.: This law is very problematic, and I believe there are several groups that are already preparing lawsuits challenging it. The White House is also taking a look to see if there is anything that can be done by the federal government. More than anything, this law highlights the fact that our immigration system is badly broken. We’re seeing more and more of these harsh anti-immigrant laws at the state and local level.

Published in the The Columbian Missourian

Another "War on Drugs?"

Published on Thu, May 27, 2010

Right now, the Obama Administration has misplaced priorities when it comes to border security. The American Immigration Council believes policy makers must make a distinction in any comprehensive immigration reform package between undocumented immigrants crossing the border and the drug induced violence of the drug cartels. “But cracking down on unauthorized immigrants in the United States is not going to diminish violence in border communities because unauthorized immigrants aren't the perpetrators, criminal cartels are.”

Published in the National Hispanic Christian Leadership Council

In wake of Arizona Law, Labor Unites Behind Immigration Reform: Unions Stand to Gain Strength

Published on Mon, Jun 28, 2010

A January report by the liberal Center for American Progress and Immigration Policy Center noted that a large population of unauthorized immigrants — 10 to 12million, per most estimates — depresses wages for low-skilled jobs. Unscrupulous employers can hire and underpay unlawful workers, who have no ability to unionize or push back politically. In other words, the larger the undocumented population, the smaller the clout of organized labor.

Legalizing unlawful immigrants and ensuring the rights of all workers, the CAP and IPC study concluded, would “help American workers” by “rais[ing] the ‘wage floor’ for the entire U.S. economy.” Newly naturalized workers could also give unions a boost, particularly if they view them as allies early on.

Published in the New Mexico Independant

Minorities Flex Economic, Ballot Strength

Published on Wed, Jul 28, 2010

An immigration think tank in Washington Wednesday released a report showing the impact of immigrants on the nation and individual states.

The Immigration Policy Center said its complete series of 50 state fact sheets highlight the political and economic power of immigrants, Latinos and Asians in every state of the union, who account for large and growing shares of the U.S. economy and electorate.

Overall, immigrants made up more than 12 percent of the U.S. population, or nearly 38 million people, in 2008, the report said.

Published in the United Press International

Rescinding an In Absentia Order of Removal

There are two main situations where individuals who were ordered removed or deported in absentia can reopen their cases: (1) they did not receive notice of the hearing, and (2) they did not appear at their hearing because of exceptional circumstances. This Practice Advisory addresses the elements and requirements for an in absentia motion to reopen in both contexts.

Published On: Wednesday, March 31, 2010 | Download File

Calling All 5th Graders

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Join the National Creative Writing Contest to explore America as a nation of immigrants and win prizes!

'Dangerous drugs' tops criminal deportations list

Published on Thu, Aug 19, 2010

Immigration and Customs Enforcement spokesman Richard Rocha said immigrants who are counted as criminals have been convicted of crimes or have a record of a conviction for a crime. But immigration advocates are skeptical of the definition because ICE enforcement includes detaining people before they've been convicted, its definition of crimes includes misdemeanors and minor traffic offenses and its definition of a criminal immigrant has been inconsistent, said Michele Waslin, a senior policy analyst at the Immigration Policy Center.

Published in the Associated Press

Notices to Appear

This practice advisory, written in collaboration with the ABA Commission on Immigration and Penn State Law’s Center for Immigrants’ Rights, provides innovative legal and procedural arguments and strategies for attorneys representing noncitizens 1) who are likely to be issued NTAs, 2) who have been issued NTAs that have not been filed with the immigration court, or 3) who have been issued NTAs that have been filed. It provides an overview of the legal requirements for an NTA and strategies available to attorneys to cancel, mitigate, or challenge the contents of an NTA. In addition to presenting legal and procedural arguments, the advisory provides strategies to attorneys wishing to seek prosecutorial discretion in connection with the NTA.

Published On: Monday, June 30, 2014 | Download File

High School Lesson Plan 3: Issues in Immigration

The Issues in Immigration series consists of three parts or modules listed below. Each module is designed to teach secondary students about immigration and immigrant conflicts, myths and facts. The lesson will also increase student awareness about immigration issues.

Module One: Debate

Module Two: The Lost Boys of Sudan

Module Three: Lost Childhoods - Unaccompanied Children