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Arizona

AIC Resources for AILA Arizona Chapter:

Policy Resources       Education Resources       The Council in the News

International Exchange Center Resource

Practice Advisories       Immigration Impact Blog

 

Your AIC Ambassador: Andrew Shackelford

andrew@awsimmigration.com
Law Office of Andrew W. Shackelford, PLLC
Website:
http://awsimmigration.com/
About Andrew:
COMING SOON!

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CIS Report Attempts to Erase 100 Years of Data

Wishful Thinking on Immigration and Crime

Released on Wed, Nov 18, 2009

A new report from the restrictionist group Center for Immigration Studies (CIS), Immigration and Crime: Assessing a Conflicted Issue, attempts to overturn a century’s worth of research which has demonstrated repeatedly that immigrants are less likely than the native-born to commit violent crimes or end up behind bars.

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Lawsuit Filed Against DHS and USCIS Seeks Transparency Promised by Obama Administration

AILA Seeks Disclosure of Records under FOIA

Released on Tue, Jul 20, 2010

The American Immigration Council's Legal Action Center filed a lawsuit against the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) on behalf of the American Immigration Lawyers Association (AILA) seeking the public release of records concerning agency policies and procedures for the "H-1B" visa program - a program which allows U.S. businesses to temporarily employ highly-skilled foreign workers.

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Michigan

AIC Resources for AILA Michigan Chapter:

Policy Resources       Education Resources       The Council in the News

Practice Advisories       Immigration Impact Blog

 

Your AIC Ambassador: David Wenger

dkw@wengerlaw.com
David K. Wenger & Associates, PC

About David:
COMING SOON!

 

 

 

 

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American Immigration Council Urges DOJ to Undertake Regulatory Reform

Released on Mon, Apr 04, 2011

In response to the Department of Justice’s request for comments regarding a review of its existing regulations, the American Immigration Council highlighted several issues we previously have brought to the attention of the Executive Office for Immigration Review. We urge the Department to: (1) withdraw the departure bar to motions to reopen; (2) issue clear yet flexible rules governing ineffective assistance of counsel claims; (3) initiate a rulemaking process to establish fair removal procedures for noncitizens with mental disabilities; and (4) consider regulatory amendments that would remedy Employment Authorization Document asylum clock problems. Our letter describes these four requests and provides accompanying information detailing the need for regulatory reform.

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Sarah E. Hendricks, Ph.D

Sarah E. Hendricks, Ph.D is a lecturer in the Department of Sociology at Drake University.  She completed her doctoral degree in 2013 with the University of Tennessee.  Her research broadly focuses on the social consequences of limited mobility, with a specific focus on how transportation limitations affect the experiences of Latino immigrants in the United States.

 

Prosecutorial Discretion Guidelines May Provide Temporary Relief to Gay and Lesbian Bi-National Couples

Released on Fri, Aug 19, 2011

Washington D.C. –Yesterday, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) announced that they are taking concrete steps to implement existing guidance on prosecutorial discretion across the agency in an attempt to provide relief for low priority immigration cases. DHS also announced the creation of a committee which will review 300,000 immigration cases currently in removal proceedings to determine which cases are low priority and can be administratively closed. One of the factors in determining low priority cases is family relationships and community ties—factors the Administration said yesterday may apply to gay and lesbian families.

There are currently 36,000 same-sex bi-national couples in the United States, many of whom are routinely denied applications for lawful permanent residence and other relief from deportation due to the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA). Enacted in 1996, DOMA prevents the federal government—including DHS—from recognizing marriages or civil unions of same-sex couples for purposes of receiving federal benefits. Although the Administration determined that parts of DOMA were unconstitutional, DHS is still denying immigration benefits to same-sex spouses of bi-national couples.

DHS’s recent announcement, however, suggests that the guidelines on prosecutorial discretion may provide temporary relief to gay and lesbian bi-national couples. On a conference call hosted by the Immigration Policy center yesterday, a panel of experts discussed how the new policy may help gay and lesbian bi-national couples:

Mary Kenney, Senior Staff Attorney with the Council’s Legal Action Center, said:Read more...

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As Immigrants Move In, Americans Move Up

Published on Mon, Aug 24, 2009

A perceived weakness of the liberal argument on immigration is over-reliance on the concept of compassion. The perception is reinforced in part by reality, as liberals commonly call upon people to remember the importance of basic human solidarity and concern for others in the debate over immigration.

Published in the WireTap Magazine

Legal Action Center Files Suit Against DHS for Failure to Disclose Records on "Voluntary" Returns

Released on Fri, Jun 08, 2012

Washington D.C. - Yesterday, the Legal Action Center (LAC) at the American Immigration Council, in collaboration with Hughes Socol Piers Resnick & Dym, filed suit against Customs and Border Protection (CBP) and the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) for unlawfully withholding records concerning voluntary returns of noncitizens from the United States to their countries of origin. Between January 2009 and April 2011, CBP managed 662,485 voluntary returns of Mexican nationals. Read more...

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