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Spanish language media: GOP presidential candidates move forward with immigration policies despite Latino disapproval

Published on Mon, Feb 27, 2012

GOP presidential candidates have voiced their support for immigration policies that leave out most Latino voters, who are looking for a common sense solution to the issue, but Democrats are not doing much better, participants in Spanish language Univision news show Al Punto said Sunday.

Immigration policies supported by GOP presidential candidates “do not articulate a poltical or economic position that is realistic,”said Viviana Hurtado, of the Wise Latina Club, on Al Punto.

According to TIME magazine’s Tim Padgett, ”the Latino community, especially the Mexican American community, do not want an open door policy that lets anybody in.” What they want, said Padgett, “is a common sense policy” – something neither Democrats nor Republicans have offered.

Padgett added that “Democrats are doing well with Latinos only because Republicans are doing so badly.”

Sylvia Manzano, of Latino Decisions, wrote Sunday that “Republican candidates have devoted quite a bit of time to issues disproportionately affecting Latinos, asserting their party and ideological bona fides on topics like official English language laws, immigration, Mexican border control, the DREAM Act, bilingual education and various identification laws. From the vantage point of most Latino voters, the Republican party champions positions opposite to their interests.”

According to the The Guardian, Kris Kobach, author of the controversial immigration enforcement laws in Arizona and Alabama, ”has been in direct discussions with [Mitt Romney] the presidential candidate about possible changes to federal policy should Romney win the Republican nomination and go on to take the White House.”

Kobach, current Kansas Secretary of State, is a long-time supporter of “attrition through enforcement” policies, which Romney himself has called “self-deportation.”Read more...

Published in the Florida Independent

Organizations in Your Community

Educators, community organizers and civic leaders interested in engaging your community with service learning projects? Find local organizations committed to immigrant rights, integration and social justice. Read more...

"A Magical Place in this World"

Published on Tue, May 15, 2012

"There is a magical place in this world,

Where people come to look for freedom and happiness."

Those are the opening lines from a winning poem by Illinois fifth grader and champion gymnast Alexander Tymouch. The poem took the top spot in the 2012 American Immigration Council's annual "Celebrate America" fifth grade creative writing contest

Read more...

Published in the The San Diego Union-Tribune

Leadership Roster

American Immigration Council 2014-2015 Leadership Roster


Lori Chesser, Chair

Davis Brown Law Firm

Lori Chesser is a senior shareholder of the Davis Brown Law Firm and the chair of the Firm's immigration Department. She has a background in finance and corporate law, but has been practicing primarily in immigration law for 20 years.

Lori represents individuals and companies in employment-based immigration applications for both temporary and permanent positions, assists in making visa applications, trains and advises companies on I-9 compliance and audit response, and helps plan immigration strategy for business owners and entrepreneurs. She also assists in family-based immigration, including fiancé(e) visa applications and marriage-based and other family-related immigration issues. Finally, she advises clients on maintaining permanent residence and applying for naturalization, and works in conjunction with the firm's tax and estate planning departments to optimize immigration status for financial planning purposes.

Read more...

Bay Area Immigrants Warned Of Scams As Deferred Deportation Begins

Published on Wed, Aug 15, 2012

CBS San Francisco used IPC's statistics about potential candidates for deferred action in an article last Wednesday.  The article warns Bay Area immigrants to watch out for scams, as more and more people try to take advantage of those applying for deferred deportation. Read more...

Published in the CBS San Francisco

Mr. Moreno Carrasco

The ninth of eleven children, Moreno E. Carrasco was born in the Dominican Republic. When he was five years old, his father passed away leaving his mom to care for him and ten other children.

In 1978, he came to the United States with the intention of staying permanently. However, after learning English for one year, Moreno returned home to go to college because his mother was afraid he would get "corrupted" in the United States. He missed the U.S. dearly and returned after the first semester. His first intentions were to go to California to become an eneologist (wine producer). However, he started to tutor foreign students in English and developed a love for education. His French advisor suggested that he obtain his teaching certification, in case the "wine "thing didn't work out. He graduated in 1983 from The University of Maryland at College Park with a degree in French and Spanish Education. That summer he had the opportunity to attend summer classes at La Sorbonne in Paris. In 1984, Moreno started teaching in the Howard County Public Schools system. He became an assistant principal in 1992, and 1996, he joined the Montgomery County Public Schools system as principal at Eastern Middle School. Later in 2003, he would become principal of Richard Montgomery High School. Under his leadership, Robert Montgomery High School has been ranked as the number one school in the State of Maryland and as high as number 11 in the United States.

In 1988, he received a Master's degree in Supervision and Public Administration and has been serving as an adjunct professor of Diversity and Education at Johns Hopkins University since 1994.Read more...

IPC Cited in NBC Latino Article

Published on Mon, May 13, 2013

A recent article on NBC Latino drew attention to a recent IPC Fact Sheet, Lost in the Shadow of the Fence.  In the Fact Sheet, we pointed out the importance of the economic relationship between Mexico and the United States, and how that should be remembered during the debates around border enforcement.  Here's a clip of the NBC Latino article:

"The American public is not getting the full picture of the current state of Mexico’s economy and its increasing importance as a trading partner. Mexico is the world’s 12th largest economy and America’s second largest export market...

The Immigration Policy Center’s “Lost in the Shadow of the Fence” states there was a 9.1 percent increase in goods exported to Mexico from the U.S. in just one year, from 2011 to 2012."

Published in the NBC Latino

Roxanne Lynn Doty

Roxanne Lynn Doty joined the ASU faculty in 1990. She received her BA and MA for Arizona State University and Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota. Professor Doty has contributed articles to International Studies Quarterly, Review of International Studies, European Journal of International Relations, Security Studies, Alternatives, Cambridge Review of International Affairs, Millennium‐Journal of International Studies, and International Political Sociology. She is the recipient of a Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation grant 1997‐1998. Her current research interests include international relations theory, border studies, and the politics of writing.

IPC Senior Fellow Rob Paral in Politico

Published on Thu, Oct 10, 2013

Rob Paral, a Senior Fellow for the IPC, was published yesterday in Politico explaining why Republican lawmakers can't ignore minority voters in regards to immigration reform.  The article was based on Paral's recent Special Report for the IPC, "Stepping Up:  The Impact of the Newest, Immigrant, Latino, and Asian Voters."

"A recent Immigration Policy Center analysis of demographic and immigration trends shows that many Republican congressional districts are seeing their constituency profiles evolve dramatically, with emerging electorates that care deeply about immigration reform. In fact, according to my research, based on U.S. Census Bureau age and citizenship data, Asian and Latino youth and newly naturalized U.S. citizens will make up 34 percent of newly eligible voters at the time of the 2014 elections in 55 Republican-held congressional districts."

Published in the Politico

David Shirk, Ph.D.

Dr. David Shirk received his Ph.D. in Political Science at the University of California, San Diego, and joined the Political Science Department at the University of San Diego in 2003. He serves as the Director of the Trans‐Border Institute and conducts research and publishes on topics related to Mexican politics, U.S.‐Mexican relations, and law enforcement and security issues along the U.S.‐Mexican border. Dr. Shirk is the Principal Investigator for TBI's Justice in Mexico Project, a bi‐national research initiative focused on criminal justice and the rule of law in Mexico that is sponsored by the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation and the Tinker Foundation. He has been a fellow at the Center for U.S.‐Mexican Studies (1998‐99; 2002‐04) and at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars (2009‐10).