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What Makes Us American: A Video Montage

This video presents a montage highlighting the diversity and pluralism that makes our nation uniquely multicultural.

When you think of the United States what is the first thing that comes to mind? Maybe you think of the food, the holidays, or symbols of the American identity? Each of these elements paints a picture of the United States, but what truly makes our country what it is today, is the people.

For more information, resources, and lesson plans: www.communityeducationcenter.org

 

Will New Immigration Law Help or Hurt Arizona Economy?

Published on Sun, Jul 11, 2010

In response, the Immigration Policy Center, which opposes SB 1070, called the report "highly misleading." It questioned FAIR's calculations and said the report failed to account for other economic benefits. It pointed to a 2008 study by the Perryman Group, an economic analysis company, that estimated the U.S. economy would shrink by $245 billion without illegal immigrants and lose 2.8 million jobs.

Published in the Arizona Republic

Inspection and Entry at a Port of Entry: When is there an Admission?

This practice advisory discusses entries in three common situations: where a noncitizen is “waved” through a port of entry with no questions asked; where entry is gained by fraud or misrepresentation; and where there is a false claim to U.S. citizenship.  With respect to each situation, the practice advisory explores whether an “admission” has occurred, the individual’s immigration status upon entry, and the immigration consequences of the action.  It also discusses the impact of these three types of entries on a DACA application.

Published On: Thursday, October 22, 2015 | Download File

Interpreting the Impact of Cesar Chavez’s Early Years

In this immigration lesson plan, students will understand how Cesar Chavez’s adolescence as a migrant farm worker influenced his later achievements.  First, students will analyze how an artist and biographer have interpreted Chavez’s legacy.  Then by reading excerpts from Chavez’s autobiography, students will draw connections between how his early years shaped his later beliefs and achievements around organized labor, social justice, and humane treatment of individuals. Once students have read and critically thought about these connections, they will write a response supported with evidence from the text to answer the investigative question on the impact of Chavez’s early years and development.

Extensions and adaptations are available for English Language Learners and readers at multiple levels.

For lesson procedures, Common Core and C3 standards alignment, please click here

Year Released: 2015

6-8 and 9-12

View File

Despite ruling by federal judge on Arizona's anti-immigration law, we must keep pressure on

Published on Sun, Aug 01, 2010

"Now, the question is whether politicians at the state and federal level will stop playing politics and start solving problems," said Benjamin Johnson, executive director of the American Immigration Council. "Arizona must start focusing on serious criminals and the federal government must assume its Constitutional duty of fixing the broken immigration system. America needs real solutions that make our communities safer, our border more secure, and finally fix our broken immigration system."

Published in the New York Daily News

VAWA

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Working with partner non-profits, the LAC convinced USCIS to adopt a policy that allows VAWA applicants to apply for adjustment of status under INA § 245(a) even if the applicant is present in the U.S. without inspection and admission or parole. This policy favorably impacts thousands of battered immigrants.

 

Immigration slowdown due to economy, not enforcement

Published on Thu, Sep 09, 2010

While the Department of Homeland Security has taken credit for a significant drop in unauthorized immigration since 2007, pointing to increased enforcement by the Obama administration, the the decline is actually most likely due to the recession, according a new report by the Immigration Policy Center, the research and policy arm of the American Immigration Council.

Published in the New Mexico Independent

Appointed Counsel for Children in Immigration Proceedings

Each year, the government initiates immigration court proceedings against thousands of children, but does not guarantee that those children have legal representation. Like adults, children who cannot afford to hire an attorney or find pro bono counsel are forced to navigate the complex and adversarial immigration system on their own, even though the government is always represented by a trained attorney.

CASES | RESOURCES

CASES

J.E.F.M. v. Holder

On July 9, 2014, the American Immigration Council, with co-counsel American Civil Liberties Union, Northwest Immigrant Rights Project, Public Counsel, and K&L Gates LLP, filed a nationwide class-action lawsuit in U.S. District Court for the Western District of Washington on behalf of children who are challenging the federal government's failure to provide them with legal representation as it carries out removal proceedings against them.

The complaint charges the U.S. Department of Justice, Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, Department of Health and Human Services, Executive Office for Immigration Review, and Office of Refugee Resettlement with violating the U.S. Constitution's Fifth Amendment Due Process Clause and the Immigration and Nationality Act’s provisions requiring a “full and fair hearing” before an immigration judge. It seeks to require the government to provide children with legal representation in their immigration proceedings.Read more...