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2009 Winner, Olivia Chiu

"The American Punch”

By Olivia Chiu

Monterey Hills Elementary School

South Pasadena, California

America arrived at the Annual Society of the United Nations and walked in, seeing other countries dancing and chatting. Instead of discussing important topics, their meetings were always just fun and games. America sat down and drank a cup of punch. Then she chatted with Indonesia until Canada asked her to dance, because they were neighbors. While they were dancing, Canada asked, "Why are you so prosperous?" America thought a little and answered, "Between 1880 and 1920, many people immigrated to me, arriving in the millions. In all, there were 25 million people that came."

 

"There is no way that there were 25 million immigrants passed through your borders! It is impossible!" cried China, who had been listening. "Impossible!"

 

"I am like this punch I am drinking, made up of various ingredients. Immigrants from all over the world brought different foods, clothing, and religions. I am proud of the diversity. The exchange of ideas makes everybody more open-minded and accepting. If you walk down one of my busy streets nowadays, you will see many different shops: Chinese, Hispanic, Middle Eastern, all side by side and getting along.

 Read more...

Texas Cities Join Others in Brief Opposing Arizona Law

Published on Wed, Apr 04, 2012

The city of Austin didn’t like Arizona’s controversial immigration-enforcement law — SB1070 — when it first passed in 2010, and it still doesn’t like the measure today as the U.S. Supreme Court prepares to hear arguments for and against it.

In 2010, the city of Austin quickly passed a resolution that urged city departments to sever ties with businesses in that state.

Council members said then they wanted to send a message that they opposed racial discrimination of any kind, and they didn’t want to risk subjecting city employees to “unfounded detentions while on official city business” in Arizona.

Now, Austin — along with the city of Laredo and Dallas County — is again expressing dismay over the measure in an amicus brief with the U.S. Supreme Court. Oral arguments in the case are scheduled for April 25.

Meanwhile, a leading immigration-policy think tank has issued a report stating that if the justices rule in Arizona’s favor, individuals may still bring additional legal claims to halt the policy depending on how it is enforced.

The court will review four provisions of the Arizona law, which has been enjoined by a federal district court. They include a requirement that police officers attempt to determine the immigration status of a person stopped if they suspect the person is in the country illegally; a requirement that immigrants register with the federal government and carry a registration card with them; a provision that makes it a crime for an unauthorized immigrant to work, apply for work or solicit work; and a provision that allows officers to arrest immigrants without a warrant if probable cause exists that they have committed a deportable offense.

The amicus brief, joined by 41 cities, the United States Conference of Mayors and the National League of Cities, argues that the law, and others like it, open the door for racial profiling and adversely affect community policing efforts.Read more...

Published in the Texas Tribune

The LAC Docket

The LAC Docket is the newsletter of the American Immigration Council's Legal Action Center. To view individual editions of the newsletter, please click the links below. Archives of our former newsletter -- the Litigation Clearinghouse Newsletter -- can be found here.

The LAC Docket l Volume IV, Issue 3 (June 17, 2014)

This issue of the Docket discusses our litigation involving eligibility for 212(h) waivers; adjustment of status for individuals granted TPS, but who entered without admission; and whether Border Patrol Agents can be liable for damages for Fourth Amendment violations.  It also highlights our advocacy around the DACA renewal process and provides links to our updated practice advisory on the Equal Access to Justice Act.

The LAC Docket l Volume IV, Issue 2 (April 11, 2014)

This issue of the Docket announces the launch of a new website highlighting litigation that exposes CBP abuses; describes our litigation involving the right to bring litigation for damages suffered as a result of an unlawful deportation, eligibility for 212(h) waivers, advisals of rights before interrogation, ineffective assistance of counsel, and the right to cross examine witnesses in immigration court; discusses settlements in our class action lawsuits; and provides links to our new practice advisories.

The LAC Docket l Volume IV, Issue 1 (January 28, 2014)Read more...

No ruling on SB 1070; more Supreme Court opinions expected Monday

Published on Thu, Jun 21, 2012

The California NPR station 89.3 KPCC used the IPC's Supreme Court Guide to Arizona v. United States in their article explaining the case: Read more...

Published in the 89.3 KPCC

Attorney Resources

RESOURCES FOR ATTORNEYS

The American Immigration Council’s strong association with the immigration law community means the International Exchange Center is both sensitive to attorney-client relations and uniquely suited to assist attorneys at every step of the J-1 process. 

Please note that all applications are now filed electronically; we no longer use paper applications.
Begin an application by clicking the green "Apply Now for Our J1 Program" button on the right.


LINKS AND RESOURCES

Application Checklist - Information RequirementsRead more...

IPC's Mary Giovagnoli in USA Today

Published on Tue, Nov 27, 2012

IPC Director Mary Giovagnoli was quoted in USA Today's article on Senators Kyl and Hutchison's ACHIEVE Act legislation.  Here's an excerpt:

WASHINGTON -- Arizona Sen.Jon Kyl and Texas Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchison introduced legislation Tuesday to give legal status to young immigrants brought to the United States illegally as children.

The bill by the two Southwest Republicans -- and Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz. -- would offer special student and work visas and ultimately permanent legal status to those who earn a college degree or serve four years in the military.

"We need to have a discussion that is sensible, that is calm," said Kyl, who, like Hutchison, is retiring in January. "This particular piece of immigration reform seemed a logical place to begin."

Unlike several previous "Dream Act"-style bills, it does not offer a special pathway to citizenship, a conscious omission that is likely to be opposed by immigrant rights' groups and many Democrats.

"I think this is a doubled-edged sword," said Mary Giovagnoli, director of the Immigration Policy Center, which advocates for immigrants' rights. "On one hand, I think it's great that people are putting ideas out there about how to go forward on immigration. At the same time, I think it's really unfortunate that the choice is being made to put solutions out there that don't include the opportunity for people to become citizens."

Published in the USA Today

William R. (Bill) Yates

Bill Yates possesses over thirty-one years experience in immigration issues with the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) and the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). He began his career as a special agent with the INS in Newark, New Jersey in 1974, and rose through the ranks to become the senior career official with USCIS.

His immigration career includes experience in a number of operations disciplines. He has performed adjudications, detention and removal, inspections, and investigations work for the INS and USCIS. He has supervisory and managerial experience in airport and seaport operations, district offices, regional offices, service centers and Headquarters. He has held a number of senior management positions including: Director of the Organized Crime Drug Enforcement Task Force, Director of the Vermont Service Center, Director of the Eastern Region, Deputy Executive Associate Commissioner for Operations, Deputy Executive Associate Commissioner for Immigration Services, and his final position at the time of his retirement, Chief of Domestic Operations for USCIS.

Mr. Yates played key roles in many INS and USCIS initiatives over the years, including the direct mail adjudications program, the creation of the Immigration Services Division of the INS, and the creation of USCIS as a component of the Department of Homeland Security. More importantly, he strove to find reasonable solutions for frequently unreasonable problems, to treat customers and employees with dignity and respect, and to correct errors in policy and interpretation by the government, including his own, because people matter.Read more...

Huffington Post Cites IPC Report in Op-Ed

Published on Sat, Jul 13, 2013

In a Huffington Post Op-Ed by James Zogby, the President of the Arab American Institute, cited an IPC report on America's immigrant heritage.  He writes:

"Immigrants have always been derided as "lazy," "different and unable to fit in," and a "drain on the economy." This was said of the Irish, the Italians and the Eastern and Central Europeans. In a marvelous study compiled for the Immigration Policy Center, researcher Jeffrey Kaye compares the recent bigoted statements made by politicians in Hazleton, Pennsylvania (who are themselves descendants of immigrants) with the statements made about their ancestors when they first arrived in America, a century ago. They too were defamed as "lawbreakers," " a drain on public funds" and "not able to assimilate.""

Published in the Huffington Post

Richard T. Herman

Richard T. Herman is the founder of Richard T. Herman & Associates, an immigration and business law firm in Cleveland, Ohio which serves a global clientele in over 10 languages. He is the co‐founder of a chapter of TiE, a global network of entrepreneurs started in 1992 in Silicon Valley. He has appeared on National Public Radio, FOX News, and various affiliates of NBC, CBS, and ABC. He has also been quoted in such publications as USA Today, InformationWeek, PCWorld, ComputerWorld, CIO, Site Selection and National Lawyers Weekly.

IPC Data on Taxes Paid By Undocumented Immigrants Cited by Latin Times

Published on Tue, Feb 11, 2014

The Latin Times cited data from the IPC's "Facts about the Individual Tax Identification Number (ITIN)" in a recent article titled "GOP Amendment Seeks To Deny Child-Tax Refund To Undocumented Children".

"A statement released by her office then said that the credit 'currently costs taxpayers billions', an assertion challenged shortly afterward by Univision analyst Fernando Espuelas in a column for the Hill.  Espuelas pointed out that undocumented immigrants often pay taxes using the Individual Taxpayer Identification Number (ITIN), contributing what he described as a “net multibillion-dollar gain for the federal, state and local treasuries, even when factoring in the Child Tax Credit”.  The Immigration Policy Center wrote in 2009 that in 2001, the ITIN brought in $300 million in taxes from undocumented filers."

Published in the Latin Times