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Kavitha Sreeharsha, Esq.

Kavitha Sreeharsha is a Senior Staff Attorney at Legal Momentum’s Immigrant Women Program. Her work focuses on immigration policy advocacy and technical assistance relating to immigrant women issues. Her advocacy includes co‐chairing the Freedom Network (USA), the only human‐rights based anti‐trafficking coalition in the United States. Kavitha received her J.D. from U.C. Hastings and her B.A. from U.C. Berkeley. She is a recipient of several awards including the 2004 Unity Award from the Coalition of Minority Bar Associations and the 2007 Tanya Nieman Award from Partners Ending Domestic Abuse in San Francisco. Kavitha is based in Washington, D.C.

IPC Data Cited in Latin Times

Published on Thu, Apr 24, 2014

The Latin Times recently cited the IPC report "Understanding Prosecutorial Discretion in Immigration Law" in an article titled "ICE Data Says Agency Rarely Uses ‘Prosecutorial Discretion’ To Close Cases Against Immigrants".

"The Immigration Policy Center notes that discretion can be used at any stage of an immigration case, from the apprehension phase – when it comes to stopping, questioning and arresting particular people, focusing resources on certain violations or conduct, or detaining people already in police custody or under supervision – to referring cases to courts to begin deportation proceedings.  In most of the country, it appears that authorities rarely practice such discretion after proceedings are already opened: between October 2012 and March 2014, the group reports, ICE intervened to close only 6.7 percent of cases they’d earlier referred to the courts.  The percentage varied widely by region; in Tucson and Seattle, it was around 30 percent."

Published in the Latin Times

CBP Abuse of Authority



U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) agents across the country routinely disregard basic constitutional protections and the human rights of immigrants and U.S. citizens. Along both the northern and southern borders, CBP agents routinely overstep the boundaries of their authority by conducting enforcement activities outside border regions, making racially motivated arrests, employing derogatory and coercive interrogation tactics, and imprisoning arrestees under inhumane conditions.

In an effort to promote greater accountability by CBP on this issue, the Legal Action Center of the American Immigration Council, the National Immigration Project of the National Lawyers Guild, the Northwest Immigrant Rights Project, and the ACLU of San Diego and Imperial Counties are coordinating a national litigation effort.  Through this effort, during the week prior to March 12, 2012, attorneys in states along both the northern and southern borders filed individual complaints for damages on behalf of ten individuals who had suffered abuse at the hands of CBP agents.  These complaints highlight the breadth of the problem and the culture of impunity that has taken hold within the agency.Read more...

The Unemployment and Immigration Disconnect

Released on Mon, May 18, 2009

The Immigration Policy Center released two installments of a three-part series, Untying the Knot, which seeks to debunk the frequently misrepresented relationship between immigration and unemployment. Read more and listen to a recording of today's teleconference.

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Immigration in Connecticut

State Fact Sheets

District-by-District Profiles

We have not created any Connecticut district profiles yet.  For Congressional districts in other states, visit our District-by-District page.

Fact Sheets and Reports

We do not have any Connecticut-specific fact sheets or reports yet, but you can find more information on State Immigration Legislation here.Read more...

New CIS Report Suggests Spend More, Say Nothing

Released on Tue, Jul 29, 2008

A new report released by the Center for Immigration Studies (CIS) on Wednesday, July 30th, claims that stepped-up enforcement measures account for much of the recent decline in the undocumented immigrant population. The following is a statement by Angela Kelley, Director of the Immigration Policy Center.

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Secretary Janet Napolitano Testifies Before Congress

Released on Wed, Dec 09, 2009

Washington D.C. - Today, the Senate Judiciary Committee held an oversight hearing with Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Secretary Janet Napolitano. The Secretary's opening statement reiterated her view that immigration enforcement is a necessity, but that enforcement alone is not a solution for our broken immigration system. Secretary Napolitano noted, "We can no longer perpetuate a status quo that is unacceptable for workers, employers, law enforcement, faith leaders, and America as a whole. We must seize this moment to build a truly effective immigration system that deters illegal immigration, provides effective and enduring enforcement tools, protects workers from exploitation and retaliation, and creates a tough but fair path to legalization for the millions of illegal immigrants already here."

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Colorado

 

Council Resources for AILA Colorado Chapter:

Policy Resources       Education Resources     International Exchange Center Resource

  The Council in the News   Practice Advisories       Immigration Impact Blog

 

Your Council Ambassador: Vacant

 

Council Board Members in Your AreaRead more...

Pew Report Sheds Little Light on Birthright Citizenship

Released on Wed, Aug 11, 2010

Washington D.C. - Over the last several weeks, a handful of elected officials have re-ignited a call for the repeal of birthright citizenship. Claiming that countless unauthorized and temporary immigrants are coming to the United States solely to give birth, some are suggesting changing the Fourteenth Amendment of the U.S. Constitution, thereby forcing the U.S. government to individually determine the citizenship of every single child born in the country.

A new report from the Pew Hispanic Center is intended to provide data on the numbers of children born to unauthorized immigrants each year. However, the report offers no real clarity on the question of birthright citizenship. Limitations in the Census data upon which the report is based make it impossible to determine how many children are born into families in which both parents are unauthorized or temporarily in the United States. As a result, the report is only able estimate that 340,000 of the 4.3 million children born in the United States in 2008 had at least one unauthorized parent. In other words, this figure includes families in which one parent is unauthorized and the other a U.S. citizen or legal immigrant, so we still have no idea how many children would be affected by a change to the Fourteenth Amendment. If anything, the Pew report highlights how complicated this issue is given that so many unauthorized immigrants live in "mixed status" families that also include U.S. citizens and legal immigrants.Read more...

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