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Legalization

Immigrant vigil stresses necessity of a path to legalization

Published on Wed, Aug 11, 2010

Immigrants aren’t very noticeable in West Virginia, which was 95 percent white in the year 2000, according to the Census. Yet, they’re here. The Immigration Policy Center estimates that the state was home to more than 23,000 immigrants in 2008, and the population is growing. Many of the immigrants are Latino or Asian.  

Published in the West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals

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Published On: Thursday, August 28, 2014 | Download File

Workshop 2006

The American Immigration Law Foundation's Curriculum Center held five successful teachers' symposia in 2006. Teachers attended free day long professional development workshops in Chicago, Miami, Philadelphia, San Francisco and Washington, D.C.The symposia focused on current immigration policies, presenting immigration in the classroom, sharing stories through oral history, learning with literature and media and using artifacts, primary sources and dramatic arts to teach immigration.

Poll indicates Latinos alienated by GOP

Published on Wed, Oct 06, 2010

According to the most recent data from the 2010 Census, Latinos make up 11.5 percent of Utah’s population. The Immigration Policy Center revealed 32 percent of immigrants in Utah in 2008 were naturalized citizens who can vote. That number continues to rise.

Published in the Salt Lake City Examiner

Visa Bulletin – Rejection of Employment-Based Adjustment Applications

In June 2007, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) refused to accept tens of thousands of employment-based applications for adjustment of status (and discouraged thousands of other workers from even applying) in violation of federal statutes, regulations and policies. Although the LAC was poised to file a class action on July 17, 2007 to challenge these unlawful actions, this became unnecessary after USCIS and the Department of State reversed course and resolved the issues. Read the prepared complaint.

Birthright Citizenship’s Unlikely Road to Supreme Court

Published on Wed, Dec 22, 2010

“Those children can’t petition for their parents to become U.S. citizens until they are 21 years old and it most cases, the parents would be barred from getting a visa to the United States for 10 years,” said Michelle Waslin, senior policy analyst at the American Immigration Council's Immigration Policy Center in Washington, D.C. “So that’s a 31-year plan. It doesn’t seem like it’s a very good plan to legalize your status here in the U.S. It doesn’t protect them from deportation.”

Published in the Hartford Guardian

Litigation Clearinghouse Newsletter Vol. 3, No. 12

This issue covers a recent FOIA lawsuit seeking information about stipulated removal; a Seventh Circuit case holding that the waiver of a right to a removal hearing under the Visa Waiver Program must be knowing and voluntary; a Ninth Circuit decision finding that DHS may not unilaterally block a motion to reopen to adjust status by opposing the motion; and the Supreme Court's decision to grant certiorari to examine the standard for granting stays of removal at the courts of appeals.

Published On: Tuesday, November 25, 2008 | Download File

Houston Students Take Part in Naturalization Ceremonies

Published on Thu, May 05, 2011

District Director Sandra Heathman will introduce three award winning essay writers at an N-600 Oath Ceremony that will be attended by 20 new citizens. The fifth grade winners wrote an essay, sponsored by the American Immigration Council on the theme, “Why I am Glad America is a Country of Immigrants.” The winners will read their winning essays. The new citizens have already had their N-600 Application for Certificate of Citizenship granted, and will obtain their Certificates.

Published in the USCIS Houston | View PDF