Skip to Content

Programs:

Legalization

Immigrant Entrepreneurs, Innovation, and Welcoming Initiatives by State

Image: 

Browse our state fact sheets on the impact of immigrant entrepreneurs and state Welcoming Initiatives.

Prejudice replaces fact in debate over US immigration

Published on Wed, May 12, 2010

Sir, David Pinsen’s unfounded and inaccurate accusations against Mexican and unskilled immigrants should not be allowed to go unanswered (Letters, May 10). Contrary to the myth that unskilled immigrants consume more in government resources than they pay in taxes, an April 21 study by the Immigration Policy Center shows that Arizona’s immigrant workers contributed $2.4bn in state tax revenue in 2004. One can assume that not many of these workers had PhDs.

The same study shows that Latinos and Asians in that state wield nearly $37bn in consumer purchasing power, the businesses they own had sales of $12.2bn and employed nearly 65,000 people. Studies by the same organisation of many other states show similar results. For every study by an anti-immigrant group alleging that Mexicans cannot assimilate, there is a more objective study.

Published in the Financial Times

No Pretty Pictures by Anita Lobel

Illustrated with her family photographs, and written in a straightforward prose, No Pretty Pictures offers valuable lessons on the Holocaust and survival for adolescent readers. In this lesson, students will read, reflect and use maps and text to study the "push-pull factors" of the immigrant experience.

View File

Fact Check: SB 1070 Allows for Some Racial Profiling

Published on Sun, Jun 06, 2010

There are plenty of features of the law that critics find objectionable. Among them are the penalties. Under federal law, violations of immigration statutes by someone in the U.S. illegally may in some cases be punished with a jail sentence but are often penalized by deporting the individual instead, if the government proves its case to a judge through a comprehensive set of procedures. Arizona, lacking the authority to deport anyone, will enforce jail sentences laid out in its new law for, say, failing to carry one’s immigration authorization documents or soliciting day work by the side of the road, said Mary Giovagnoli, director of the Immigration Policy Center, a pro-immigrants’ rights group. While the federal system is far from perfect (thousands of people are locked up in federal detention centers indefinitely awaiting deportation decisions), the addition of new immigration crimes at the state level with jail time attached isn’t the answer, she added.

Published in the Tuscon Sentinel

Judicial Review Provisions of The REAL ID Act

On May 11, 2005, the REAL ID Act was signed into law. This Act contains numerous provisions related to federal court review of immigration cases. This Practice Advisory discusses the provisions of the Act that pertain to judicial review of immigration decisions under the INA.

Published On: Tuesday, June 7, 2005 | Download File

What Makes Us American: A Video Montage

This video presents a montage highlighting the diversity and pluralism that makes our nation uniquely multicultural.

When you think of the United States what is the first thing that comes to mind? Maybe you think of the food, the holidays, or symbols of the American identity? Each of these elements paints a picture of the United States, but what truly makes our country what it is today, is the people.

For more information, resources, and lesson plans: www.communityeducationcenter.org

 

Authorities Say Immigration Law Won’t Change How They Do Business

Published on Wed, Jul 28, 2010

Now, unless a federal judge decides otherwise, law enforcement officers will be required starting Thursday to check the status of anyone they have “reasonable suspicion” to be in the United States illegally.

In a report released this month by the Immigration Policy Center in Washington, D.C., an Arizona attorney voiced concerns about how the law could be interpreted and carried out throughout the state.

Published in the East Valley Tribune

Moncrieffe v. Holder: Implications for Drug Charges and Other Categorical Approach Issues

In Moncrieffe, the Supreme Court held that a state drug conviction is not an aggravated felony when the statute of conviction extends to the social sharing of a small amount of marijuana. This practice advisory discusses the holding of the case, the decision’s potential broader implications, strategies for noncitizen criminal defendants, and steps that lawyers should take immediately in pending or already concluded removal proceedings affected by Moncrieffe.

Published On: Thursday, May 2, 2013 | Download File

From Writing the Page to Pressing Play: More Tips on Teaching Digital Stories on Immigration

This article completes a two-part series dedicated to the art of teaching the digital story on immigration to build writing and research skills while engendering empathy and engagement. 

These practical insights come largely from middle school teacher Brian Kelley who regularly incorporates digital storytelling and podcasting on family heritage and immigration into his curriculum. The American Immigration Council’s teacher’s guide “Crossing Borders with Digital Storytelling” complements these tips. It provides educators with easy instructions to develop similar projects in their classrooms. It is Common Core aligned and adaptable for multiple grade levels. Read more...

Year Released: 2015

Dear Tom, the 14th Amendment Has Come Before the Supreme Court

Published on Tue, Aug 10, 2010

Recently I saw a CNN debate between Michele Waslin of the Immigration Policy Center and Former Representative Tom Tancredo (R-CO) on the issue of birthright citizenship and the 14th Amendment. The most incredible part of the video, for me at least, was Tancredo's insistence that the issue of birthright citizenship has never come before the Supreme Court. As anyone who has taken a course on the history of U.S. immigration, or an introductory constitutional law class would know, the very idea of granting citizenship to those born on U.S. soil came from a Supreme Court decision in 1898, Wong Kim Ark.

Published in the The Huffington Post