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CIS Report Gets Diagnosis Right, Cure Wrong

Released on Sun, Mar 15, 2009

The Center for Immigration Studies' forthcoming report on the impact that immigration-enforcement raids at Swift & Co. meatpacking plants in 2006 had on wages and working conditions defines the problem but not the cure. In its attempt to advocate for the failed "enforcement-only" policies of the past, the report more effectively illustrates the need for comprehensive immigration reform, albeit unintentionally. The Immigration Policy Center's Director, Angela Kelley, issued a statement in response.

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On the Eve of an EEVS Hearing: What Should We Be Listening For?

Released on Sun, May 04, 2008

This week, the House Ways and Means Committee will hold a hearing on electronic employment verification systems (EEVS) -- Washington's latest magic potion for dealing with the nation's broken immigration system. As more hearings are expected in the coming weeks in other committees, including Homeland Security and Judiciary, what questions should the American public want to hear be thoroughly asked and answered?

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Submission Page Instructions

Below are a list of Tasks that need to be completed by either the J-1 Participant, the Host Organization supervisor, or an assisting Attorney. Under each Task is a short description of when the Task should be completed, and who should complete each Task.

Once a Task has been completed, the Status will change from Incomplete to Complete. Some forms will not become available until the previous forms have been completed. In this case, the Status will show as Prerequisites Not Met. The system is designed so that you should complete each Task in order progressing from the top to the bottom of the list.

If you would like to Edit your responses on any of the forms, you may select the Edit option under the Actions menus. You may also View or Delete your responses.

Once you have completed all of the required Tasks, a Green Message will display above prompting you to "Click here". If you are able to see this message, please click the link to continue to the next phase in the process.

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Immigration Reform with Legalization Does Help U.S. Economy and Newly Legalized

Released on Fri, Apr 09, 2010

Washington D.C. - A new report from the Public Policy Institute of California (PPIC), entitled Immigrant Legalization: Assessing the Labor Market Effects, yields both some enlightening and some potentially misleading results about the likely impact of a legalization program.  Because the PPIC report focuses on legal status acquired under current immigration law, it does not reflect the long-term benefits and gains that follow from a comprehensive immigration reform package which includes legalization.

While the PPIC report dovetails with other reports when it concludes that legalization would not have a negative impact on native workers' wages and employment, their findings on the wages and mobility of the newly legalized differ from other academic studies on how immigrants fare after legalization.  This difference can be attributed to the fact that PPIC looks at legalization only, and how the newly legalized are doing just 4-13 months after becoming legalized. Almost all other previous studies haven take a longer term view of their success.

PPIC relies upon data from the New Immigrant Survey (NIS), a sample of foreign-born individuals who acquired legal permanent resident (LPR) status between May and November 2003.  It is important to keep in mind that the NIS is not representative of the unauthorized-immigrant population as a whole.  As opposed to the individuals captured in the NIS, most unauthorized immigrants do not have a means of acquiring legal status.  Moreover, individuals in the NIS were interviewed 4-13 months after acquiring LPR status.Read more...

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If you have any questions, please do not hestitate to contact Anh Ngo at ango@immcouncil.org.

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Defense of Marriage Act letters to DHS, EOIR and OIL

Released on Wed, Apr 06, 2011

AILA and AIC, joined by dozens of other organizations, submitted letters to DHS, EOIR and OIL urging the adoption of interim measures in immigration cases involving same-sex marriages pending final judicial or legislative resolution regarding Section 3 of the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA). Among the interim measures proposed, the letters ask the agencies to hold in abeyance all petitions and applications that are based upon a same-sex marriage and to administratively close or otherwise continue all removal cases in which relief may be available based upon a same-sex marriage.

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2016 3rd Place National Winner

 

"The American Master'piece'"

By Nikhil Kothari, Bloomfield Hills Middle School, Bloomfield Hills, Michigan

 

America is a puzzle: a wonder to behold.
What is behind this great masterpiece? How do the pieces come together?
How can differences, carefully assembled, actually bind a country together?
Immigrants are what brings the world into the four million square miles, America.Read more...

New Asylum Clock Policies Provide No Significant Systemic Change

Released on Mon, Nov 21, 2011

Washington D.C. - Last week, the Executive Office for Immigration Review (EOIR) issued new guidance addressing the “asylum clock.”  The asylum clock calculates a mandatory 180-day waiting period before an asylum applicant can receive work authorization.  Any delay caused by the asylum applicant will stop the clock and prolong the waiting period for work authorization.  However, delays are often incorrectly attributed to the applicant and asylum seekers are unjustly prevented from working for long periods of time. 

EOIR’s new guidance provides some much-needed clarity and addresses certain longstanding problems.  In particular, it clarifies that the asylum clock should not stop in the event of a delay caused by a government attorney or the court, and that immigration judges must indicate on the record the reason for postponing a case.

Unfortunately, EOIR fails to resolve more systemic problems through its new guidance including:Read more...

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