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High School Lesson Plan 3: Issues in Immigration

The Issues in Immigration series consists of three parts or modules listed below. Each module is designed to teach secondary students about immigration and immigrant conflicts, myths and facts. The lesson will also increase student awareness about immigration issues.

Module One: Debate

Module Two: The Lost Boys of Sudan

Module Three: Lost Childhoods - Unaccompanied Children

One woman spared deportation, but millions live on the edge

Published on Wed, Dec 22, 2010

Private bills are not routinely introduced for undocumented individuals, according to Wendy Sefsaf, spokeswoman for the Washington-based Immigration Policy Center. During the 111th session of Congress, 104 bills were introduced for those who may suffer hardships if they were returned to native countries or became undocumented due to administrative delays.

That's low, Sefsaf said, compared to deportations: A record-breaking 392,000 illegal aliens were removed in 2010, a 70 percent increase from the previous administration, officials from the Department of Homeland Security and U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement announced in October.

Exactly how many private bills pass is unclear. Last week, for the first time in five years, Congress approved private bills for two Japanese citizens fighting to live in the United States — Shigeru Yamada, son of a woman who was killed in a car crash when he was a teenager and was never adopted, andHotaru "Hota" Ferschke, who found out she was pregnant and got married over the phone with a Marine who was killed in Iraq.

But Sefsaf said those cases are exceptions.

"Congress just needs to focus on a broader plan that would provide relief for the millions in this country that deserve to stay and figure out a way to weed out the ones that might not."

Published in the Detroit News

Motions to Suppress in Removal Proceedings

The LAC provides practice assistance and resources to immigration attorneys seeking to prevent the use of unlawfully obtained evidence in removal proceedings. Long used in criminal trials, motions to suppress can lead to the exclusion of evidence obtained by the government in violation of the Fourth Amendment, Fifth Amendment, or related provisions of federal law. While the immediate purpose of filing a motion to suppress is to prevent the government from meeting its burden of proof, challenges to unlawfully obtained evidence can also deter future violations by law enforcement officers and thereby protect the rights of other noncitizens.

The Supreme Court held in INS v. Lopez-Mendoza, 468 U.S. 1032 (1984), that motions to suppress evidence under the Fourth Amendment in immigration proceedings should be granted only for “egregious” violations or if violations became “widespread.” Despite this stringent standard, noncitizens have in many cases prevailed on motions to suppress.

CASES l RESOURCES

CASES

Sanchez-Lopez v. Holder, No. 13-70431 (9th Cir. amicus brief submitted Aug. 7, 2013)
Flores Perez v. Holder, No. 12-71363 (9th Cir. amicus brief submitted Jan. 3, 2014)
Read more...

From Every End of This Earth: 13 Families and the New Lives They Made in America

Author: Steven V. Roberts

Roberts, a journalist by trade and talented story teller by passion, paints the lives of 13 families by retelling their stories in a way that captures the essence of their journeys to the United States as well as their journeys to becoming Americans.  Roberts eloquently breaks down many of the myths surrounding immigrants by sharing stories of men, women and children who had to leave so much behind by emigrating.  The book is divided into sections, The Survivors, The International Entrepreneurs, The Business Owners, The Professionals, and The Women.  The characters and their stories give many  fresh perspectives on the issue of immigration.

Year Released: 2009
Grades 9-Adult

From Every End of This Earth: 13 Families and the New Lives They Made in America

Santa Clara Valley Creative Writing Contest WInner

Santa Clara Valley 2011 Creative Writing Contest Winner

Published on Fri, May 20, 2011

During the Santa Clara Valley American Immigration Lawyers Association meeting the winner of the local American Immigration Council's 14th Annual "Celebrate America" Creative Writing Contest was honored and read his winning entry.

Published in the ImmigrationProf Blog

Litigation Clearinghouse Newsletter Vol. 2, No. 11

This issue covers litigation challenging USCIS's fee increase, developments in the social security no-match letter case, the reversal of a Fifth Circuit decision on natz delay litigation, new raids lawsuits, surviving spouse litigation, and the Hutto detention facility settlement.

Published On: Sunday, September 16, 2007 | Download File

Study: Md. immigrants pay $275M in taxes

Published on Mon, Apr 18, 2011

Illegal immigrants in Maryland will pay $275 million in state and local taxes this year, according to a study released Monday by a Washington group that advocates for immigrants. The report ranks Maryland as the 11th-highest state in the nation in collecting tax receipts from unauthorized immigrants.

Maryland comes in after California, Florida and New York but ahead of Nevada and New Mexico. The state will collect $76 million in state income taxes, $22 million in property taxes and $177 million in sales taxes in the 2010 tax year, according to the Immigration Policy Center study.

The report’s authors acknowledge that “it is difficult to know precisely how much these families pay in taxes, because the spending and income behavior of these families is not as well documented as is the case for U.S. citizens.” The study’s release was timed to coincide with Monday’s deadline to file state and federal income taxes.

“Tax Day is an appropriate time to underscore the often-overlooked fact that unauthorized immigrants pay taxes,” according to an Immigration Policy Center release sent Monday. “Add this all up and it amounts to billions in revenue to state and local governments.”

In all, the group estimates that households headed by illegal immigrants will pay $11.2 billion in state and local taxes in 2010.

The Immigration Policy Center supported a proposal in Congress known as the DREAM Act that would have created a path to citizenship for some immigrants if they spent two years in the military or in college. The proposal failed. The group's estimates are based on a model developed by the Institute for Taxation and Economic Policy, whose board includes four academics as well as the co-editor of the liberal American Prospect and a union official.Read more...

Published in the Baltimore Sun

Litigation Clearinghouse Newsletter Vol. 1, No. 1

This is the inaugural issue of the Litigation Clearinghouse Newsletter.

Published On: Tuesday, December 6, 2005 | Download File