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Presentations and activities offer media-rich historical context or interactive opportunities for exploration for teachers and students alike

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What the Drop in Illegal Residency Means for Immigration Reform

Published on Fri, Sep 03, 2010

But Mary Giovagnoli, director of the more liberal Immigration Policy Institute, sees the Pew study as extra motivation to pass comprehensive immigration reform, including a legalization program for those already in the country. "I think it overall provides us with a healthy reality check on the fact that despite the claims that the country's being overrun and that all of these problems are the result of illegal immigrants, the amount of illegal immigration is, in proportion to the overall population and even in terms of overall numbers, declining," she says. "We need to seize upon that and build a smart immigration overhaul where now, with these statistics in play, we can figure out how to get it right."

The number of illegal immigrants has historically vacillated alongside the country's economic fortunes, Giovagnoli points out. "One of the overall best ways to ensure that we don't have continued loops of illegal immigration is to ensure that we have a combination of improvements to our permanent legal system and to our guest worker programs," she says. "We know that enforcement alone can't handle the situation."

Published in the Atlantic Monthly

Detainers

The LAC works with other concerned advocates to encourage DHS to develop meaningful detainer guidance to address the pervasive problems with the current detainer system. LEAs consistently violate the 48 hour rule - the statutory period that LEAs can hold noncitizens subject to ICE detainers after they would otherwise have been released from state custod - because ICE often fails to take custody of a person subject to a detainer within this timeframe. As a result, unlawfully detained persons languish in LEA custody with no recourse. Moreover, in violation of ICE’s stated enforcement priorities, ICE issues detainers without regard to the seriousness of the criminal offense for which an alleged non-citizen was arrested. Detainers also are issued without sufficient evidence of individuals’ removability, and arrested persons and their attorneys are often not advised that a detainer has been issued or how to challenge an improperly or improvidently-issued detainer. More generally, ICE has not carried out the kind of oversight or data collection necessary to ensure compliance with existing detainer guidance.

In April 2011, the LAC co-drafted comprehensive comments on DHS proposed detainer guidance and recommended that DHS promulgate new regulations that ensure more effective oversight over the issuance of detainers and better protection for those subject to detainers.

In response, ICE has since released a new detainer form that does not substantively address the comments on the proposed detainer guidance.

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The First American Settlers and the First Thanksgiving

Learn and discuss the myths and facts surrounding the first Thanksgiving and the first immigrants by engaging students in a thought-provoking and humorous read-aloud that challenges them to identify dominant and resistant readings of this national holiday.

For lesson procedures, Common Core standards alignment, please click here.

Year Released: 2014

3-5

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The Next Arizona

Published on Thu, Oct 28, 2010

After Arizona passed its crackdown law on illegal immigration, SB 1070, politicians across the country said they planned to introduce similar legislation in their states — even after the Justice Department sued Arizona for overstepping its authority to police immigration. Via Immigration Impact, pro-immigration business coalition Immigration Works USA released a report on which states are most likely to go through with their plans. Based on past enforcement policies and Republican support, four states were deemed likely to pass copycat laws: Georgia, Mississippi, Oklahoma and South Carolina.

Published in the The Washington Independent

Litigation Clearinghouse Newsletter Vol. 4, No. 10

This issue covers E-Verify litigation, prolonged detention class actions, favorable BIA precedents, removal cases involving the statute of limitation to rescind adjustment, and recently filed AILF briefs.

Published On: Friday, September 11, 2009 | Download File

Immigration bill would cost state $40 million a year

Published on Thu, Jan 20, 2011

If all illegal immigrants were removed, the state would lose $1.7 billion in economic activity, $756.8 million in gross state product and 12,059 jobs, according to the non-profit Immigration Policy Center. In a statement accompanying its report, the center opposed SB6 and an earlier, similar Arizona measure now tied up in the federal appellate courts.

"As Kentucky faces a $780 million budget shortfall in fiscal year 2011, state legislators are currently pursuing a costly and short-sighted 'papers please' law," the center said in its statement. "Senate Bill 6 is a copycat of Arizona's SB1070. ... Kentucky should consider the following evidence before continuing to pursue this kind of immigration legislation."

Published in the Lexington Herald Leader

Litigation Clearinghouse Newsletter Vol. 2, No. 5

This issue covers SSI litigation, motions to reopen filed by people who have left the United States, lawsuits challenging detention at the Hutto facility, new Litigation Clearinghouse issue pages, and a district court decision finding jurisdiction to review an adjustment of status denial.

Published On: Thursday, April 12, 2007 | Download File