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Eva Plaza

Assistant Secretary, Office of Fair Housing and Equal Opportunity

Eva M. Plaza, the current Assistant Secretary for Fair Housing and Equal Opportunity at the Department of Housing and Urban Development, brings over 15 years of experience to her position as a lawyer, manager and policy-maker.

Eva Plaza came to the United States from Mexico when she was two years old with her parents and three siblings. Ms. Plaza was admitted to Harvard University and graduated in 1980 with a Bachelor's Degree in Government. Ms. Plaza went on to study law at the University of California Berkeley (Boalt Hall) where she served as Associate Editor of The California Law Review and as Editor-in-Chief of La Raza Law Journal. After law school, Ms. Plaza was selected to the highly acclaimed Honors Program of the Department of Justice in 1984, where she worked as a Trial Attorney in the Civil Division's Commercial Litigation Branch.

Subsequently, Ms. Plaza entered private practice in Washington, DC. While her private practice focused on government contracts, she also served as one of the lead counsel in the well-known class action immigration litigation initiated as Ayuda v. Meese. Under the Clinton administration, Ms. Plaza joined the Department of Justice, where she managed and supervised a legal staff consisting of 254 employees specializing in all areas of tort law, including aviation, admiralty, constitutional torts, environmental torts, medical malpractice, AIDS litigation, banking litigation, vaccine and radiation litigation. She also chaired the Torts Branch's Representation Committee where it was her responsibility to ensure uniformity and equal treatment for federal employees in providing representation. Ms. Plaza briefed the Attorney General and the Deputy Attorney General on complex landmark cases that had fallen under media and congressional scrutiny.Read more...

Washington Post Highlights IPC Fact Sheet in Response to Rep. Steve King

Published on Wed, Jul 24, 2013

The Washington Post draws attention to a recently-updated IPC Fact Sheet, "From Anecdotes to Evidence: Setting the Record Straight on Immigrants and Crime" to refute Rep. Steve King's claims about DREAMers being criminals.

The post reads:

"King has absolutely no proof for this disgusting, prejudiced statement. (Then again, one wonders what constitutes proof for a congressman who thinks snow disproves global warming.) As the Immigration Policy Center points out, using data from the census, the Pew Hispanic Center and the FBI, crime rates have fallen in the United States as the immigrant population (legal and illegal) has increased."

Published in the Washington Post

Raúl Hinojosa-Ojeda, Ph.D.

Raúl Hinojosa-Ojeda, Ph.D. is the founding director of the North American Integration and Development Center and associate professor in the Division of Social Sciences and the César E. Chávez Department of Chicana and Chicano Studies at the University of California, Los Angeles. Born in Mexico and raised in Chicago, he received a B.A. in economics, an M.A. in anthropology, and a Ph.D. in political science at the University of Chicago. Professor Hinojosa-Ojeda has held various academic and policy research positions in a variety of universities and public institutions, including the World Bank, InterAmerican Development Bank, the White House Council of Economic Advisers, the United States Trade Representative, Stanford University, and the University of California, Berkeley.

IPC Special Report Cited by Al Jazeera America

Published on Thu, Feb 20, 2014

An IPC report titled "Bordering on Criminal: The Routine Abuse of Migrants in the Removal System" was recently cited by Al Jazeera America in an article titled "In El Paso, Residents Aren't Waiting for Congress to Fix Immigration".

The article higlights grassroots efforts to hold law enforcement accountable for abuse and mistreatment.

"A New Mexico woman recently filed a lawsuit after she experienced a six-hour search trying to cross legally from Ciudad Juarez into El Paso. The search, which included anal and vaginal probes, found no drugs.

Nationally, of those who come into contact with CBP, 11 percent report experiencing varying degrees of physical abuse and 23 percent say they received verbal abuse, according to a recent report by the Immigration Policy Center.

Far from being isolated incidents, the report’s authors argued, the mistreatment they recorded corresponds to a well-documented pattern of behavior. Of deportees interviewed for a 2011 report by the humanitarian border organization No More Deaths, 10 percent said U.S. authorities physically abused them. A separate report looking at Salvadorans deported between 1999 and 2000 found that 16 percent experienced physical abuse.Read more...

Published in the Al Jazeera America

IPC Lauds Obama Administration for Beginning Immigration Reform Discussion

Released on Tue, Jun 23, 2009

Tomorrow, President Obama and Congressional leaders will meet to chart a roadmap designed to move comprehensive immigration reform forward in 2009. The President has already begun solving our nation's toughest problems and has promised to tackle our broken immigration system in his first year in office. Leaders in Congress are also committed to moving immigration reform this year and their efforts are buoyed by a groundswell of support from the majority of Americans who want immigration reform.

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Comprehensive Immigration Reform 2014

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The Immigration Policy Center provides a range of resources that explain the major components of reform and provide context for what is in the different sections of immigration legislation moving through Congress.Read more...

Experts' Comments Slam E-Verify Program

Released on Sun, Aug 10, 2008

Final comments are due today on a rule that would make E-Verify mandatory for approximately 200,000 public and private federal government contractors and their 4 million employees.

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The Community Education Center Sponsors the 13th Annual “Celebrate America” Creative Writing Contest

Released on Thu, Oct 15, 2009

The contest kicks off on October 16, 2009 under the yearly theme, "Why I am Glad America is a Nation of Immigrants." Through this contest, fifth graders around the country are given the opportunity to embrace the United States' immigrant history through their poetry, essays, or other creative works.

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