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Fingerprints to go to feds to flag illegal immigrants

Published on Tue, May 15, 2012

New Hampshire quietly fell under the realm of Secure Communities last week, the federal program looking for potential immigration violations that checks the fingerprints of anyone who has been arrested.

According to the website of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, Secure Communities was activated throughout New Hampshire on May 8. On Tuesday, the program went into effect in Massachusetts and New York, where some political leaders have said it is not needed and unwanted.
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Published in the New Hampshire Union Leader

Dr. Nadia Krupnikova

Nadia Krupnikova was born in Moscow, Russia and immigrated to Columbia, MO when she was 14 years old. As with many Soviet Jews, Nadia's family came to escape religious and political persecution of the Soviet Russia. They left Russia with ninety dollars and two suitcases per person, feeling lucky to have escaped as opportunities began to close. Along with her mother, Nadia worked odds jobs, including cleaning homes, looking after children and alterations to help support the family. At 18, she entered medical school in Kansas City, MO, with the intention of becoming a psychiatrist. Through the plethora of scholarships, grants and loans this dream was realized after she completed her residency at George Washington University in Washington, DC. Upon graduation she became director of inpatient psychiatry at GW, where she worked and taught until 1997. While there, she also co-authored a behavioral science review book.

From then until 2000, she worked at the world-renowned Chestnut Lodge Hospital in Rockville, MD, that was founded on psychiatric principles that Nadia respected. Nadia wanted to work with severely ill patients who required hospitalization. Certainly, medications were used in treatment of the mentally ill, but Chestnut Lodge advocated a very humanistic approach that paralleled Nadia's view. It was a "labor-intensive" psycho-therapy which required intensive patient-therapist interaction. The world fame of Chestnut Lodge was well deserved, and Nadia thrived while practicing medicine there. With the closure of Chestnut Lodge, Nadia began a private practice in Rockville treating patients who are often severely mentally ill.Read more...

Immigrant Integration: How Foreign-Born Workers Compare To U.S. Citizens (INFOGRAPHIC)

Published on Tue, Aug 28, 2012

An article in the Huffington Post yesterday cited IPC statistics in an article about immigrant integration.  Check out the interesting graphic by the National Immigrant Integration Conference at the bottom of the article: Read more...

Published in the The Huffington Post

Garrett Epps

Garrett Epps, a former reporter for The Washington Post, is a novelist and legal scholar. He lives in Washington, D.C., and teaches courses in constitutional law and creative writing for law students at the University of Baltimore. His two most recent books are Peyote vs. the State: Religious Freedom on Trial and Democracy Reborn: The Fourteenth Amendment and the Fight for Equal Rights in Post‐Civil War America. This article is adapted from an article published in the American University Law Review, Vol. 60, Number 2, December 2010.

IPC Report Featured on Huffington Post

Published on Thu, Jun 06, 2013

An article in the Huffington Post highlighted a recent special report done by Cecilia Menjivar and Olivia Salcido in cooperation with the Immigration Policy Center.  The report, titled "Gendered Paths to Legal Status:  The Case of Latin American Immigrants in Phoenix, Arizona," focused on inequalities within U.S. immigration law over how men and women are treated. The article said:

"Gender inequalities seep through immigration law in the United States, making women go through a different experience than men when attempting to gain a legal status in the U.S., a new study reveals.

"'Immigration law, which on its face appears gender neutral, actually contains gender biases that create barriers for many women trying to gain legalization within the current immigration system,' stated the authors of a study released last week by the Immigration Policy Center."

Published in the Huffington Post

Susan Pierce, Ph.D.

Susan Pierce, Ph.D. is Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology, Thomas Harriot College of Arts and Sciences, East Carolina University.  

Reena Tandon teaches South Asian Studies at University of Toronto and has been affiliated with Ryerson University to teach at School of Social Work and to integrate Curricular Service Learning in the Faculty of Arts.

Elizabeth Clifford is Associate Professor of Sociology at Towson University and Director of American Studies and Coordinator of the Baltimore Immigration Summit.

 

Ben Johnson Featured in the State Journal Register

Published on Sun, Oct 27, 2013

The AIC's Executive Director, Ben Johnson, was recently featured in an op-ed piece in the Illinois newspaper, the State Journal-Register.  The piece focused on what the cost of congressional inaction on immigration reform would be for the state of Illinois.  It was based off of a recent fact sheet released by the IPC titled, "The Cost of Doing Nothing:  Dollars, Lives, and Opportunities Lost in the Wait for Immigration Reform."

In the piece, Johnson writes:

"Immigrants make up 14 percent of Illinois’ population, and 20.3 percent of all business owners in Illinois are foreign-born. The state has everything to gain from a smoothly functioning immigration system and much to lose from a system that is not in tune with current economic and social realities.

"Yet, two-and-a-half months after the Senate passed immigration reform legislation (S. 744), the House of Representatives continues to dawdle. Other than giving speeches and mulling over a few backward-looking, enforcement-only bills, the House has done nothing to revamp the broken U.S. immigration system or put forward any vision of what to do with the 11 million unauthorized immigrants now living in the United States — 525,000 of whom call Illinois home."

Published in the State Journal-Register

AP Highlights Executive Actions Taken by Reagan and Bush Sr. on Immigration

Published on Sat, Nov 15, 2014

Citing a report by the American Immigration Council detailing 36 examples of executive actons taken on immigration by every president since 1956, the Associated Press highlighted executive actions taken by Presidents Ronald Reagan and George H.W. Bush to shield immigrants from deportation.

Mark Noferi, Enforcement Fellow at the American Immigration Council, was also quoted in the article on the similarities between President Obama's possible executive order on immigration:

"It's a striking parallel," said Mark Noferi of the pro-immigration American Immigration Council. "Bush Sr. went big at the time. He protected about 40 percent of the unauthorized population. Back then that was up to 1.5 million. Today that would be about 5 million."

Published in the Associated Press