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Undocumented youth laud ‘Deferred Action’ policy

Published on Wed, Jun 27, 2012

The Asian Journal highlighted the IPC's Q&A Guide to the President's deferred action policy:

Meanwhile, many organizations have formed seminars and briefings to help people better understand the Deferred Action Policy, how the process will work and who will benefit from it. One such organization is the Immigration Policy Center which held a tele-briefing on June 21 with experts who discussed the Administration’s legal authority behind this move, what’s currently known about the process and how politics are shaping up around the decision. Read more...

Published in the Asian Journal

Creative Writing Contest Winners & Coordinators by Chapter

The 5th Grade Creative Writing Contest provides youth with an opportunity to learn more about immigration to the U.S. and to explain, in their own words, why they are proud America is a nation of immigrants. Twenty-one AILA Chapters participated in this year’s (2012) contest. The top entry from each participating AILA Chapter was judged by a panel immigration experts who chose the top five (shown in bold).

Read more...

IPC Cited in Washington Post

Published on Wed, Feb 20, 2013

An IPC report was cited in a recent article in the Washington Post on the Obama administrations push to give judges more leeway in deciding who can be deported:

"Under current law, non-citizen immigrants convicted of what’s known as an “aggravated felony” face automatic penalties that make it far harder for them to be spared from deportation. While the term suggests a crime of a serious and violent nature, the definition of an “aggravated felony” has been expanded over the years, to the point where it includes crimes that are neither “aggravated” nor “felonies.” Obama’s draft immigration bill would narrow the definition of an aggravated felony by giving immigration judges greater discretion to grant leniency to individual immigrants convicted of minor offenses.

Originally, only a small handful of serious crimes were classified as “aggravated felonies” in immigration law, but the definition was expanded in 1996 to encompass a host of other more minor offenses. “As initially enacted in 1988, the term ‘aggravated felony’ referred only to murder, federal drug trafficking, and illicit trafficking of certain firearms and destructive devices,” explains a brief from the Immigration Policy Center, an immigration advocacy group. “Today, the definition of ‘aggravated felony’ covers more than thirty types of offenses, including simple battery, theft, filing a false tax return, and failing to appear in court.”"

Published in the Washington Post

Shakeen Hossain

Mr. Hossain is the type of talented high technology employee that the U.S. needs so desperately in order to maintain current economic prosperity, growth and competitiveness. An immigrant from Bangladesh, he is a permanent resident employed in the position of Internet Services Specialist for Bell Atlantic Network Services, Inc. Bell Atlantic has over 100 U.S. operations and employs over 75,000 persons nationwide. The company's core operations are its local network systems which provide telephone service via 18.8 million residential and business access lines in six states and Washington, D.C. in the mid-Atlantic region.

Mr. Hossain designs Client/Server infrastructure software elements based on Object Oriented classes as middleware. His work is used to build Internet applications geared towards Bell Atlantic's Internet related service offerings. Mr. Hossain earned his Master of Science Degree in Computer Science from the Rochester Institute of Technology and his Bachelor in Business Administration in Management Information Systems from the University of Houston in 1990. In addition, Mr. Hossain has many years of experience working with the Eastman Kodak Company, in Senior Software Engineering positions. He resides in the United States with his wife and young son.

Brookings Report on DACA Cites IPC

Published on Wed, Aug 14, 2013

In their recent report, "Immigration Facts:  Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals," the Brookings Institution cited the IPC's estimate of the number of potentially eligible DACA Recipients.

"Estimates of the potentially eligible population calculated by the Immigration Policy Center (IPC) using age, country of birth, educational attainment and enrollment, and year of entry to the United States show approximately 936,000 immigrants were immediately eligible at the time of the announcement of the program. Eligibility criteria such as continuous residence and criminal history are much harder to approximate."

Published in the Brookings Institution

Tomás R. Jiménez, Ph.D.

Tomás R. Jiménez, Ph.D. is an assistant professor of sociology at Stanford University. He is also a Fellow at the Center for Social Cohesion. His research and writing focus on immigration, assimilation, social mobility, and ethnic and racial identity. His book, Replenished Ethnicity: Mexican Americans, Immigration, and Identity (University of California Press, 2010) draws on interviews and participant observation to understand how uninterrupted Mexican immigration influences the ethnic identity of later-generation Mexican Americans.

AIC Executive Director Benjamin Johnson Quoted in New Republic

Published on Thu, Apr 17, 2014

AIC Executive Director Benjamin Johnson was recently quoted in the New Republic article "Who's the Real Deporter-In-Chief: Bush or Obama?" Johnson emphasized the need to not only review deportation numbers but the results of current enforcement policies.

I don’t know why we’re having a conversation about the numbers—the question is, what are the results?” said Benjamin Johnson of the American Immigration Council. “As somebody who cares about immigration policy, it’s a weird and unfortunate construct. I think the people calling him deporter-in-chief are doing it because he’s punishing them through the immigration system.”

Published in the New Republic

2013 Celebrate America Creative Writing Contest

The American Immigration Council is proud to sponsor the annual Celebrate America Fifth Grade Creative Writing Contest. The contest inspires educators to bring U.S. Immigration history and lessons into their classrooms and gives fifth graders the opportunity to explore America as a nation of immigrants.

5th grade teachers sign up here!

AILF Announces New Director of the Immigration Policy Center

Released on Tue, Apr 21, 2009

The American Immigration Law Foundation (AILF) is pleased to announce that Mary Giovagnoli will become the new Director of the Immigration Policy Center (IPC).

View Release

The LAC Docket | Volume III, Issue 3

The Newsletter of the American Immigration Council’s Legal Action Center

June 25, 2013
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OUR WORK

Paths to Legal Status

Border Security, Economic Opportunity, and Immigration Modernization Act (S. 744)Read more...