Skip to Content

Programs:

Legalization

Undocumented youth laud ‘Deferred Action’ policy

Published on Wed, Jun 27, 2012

The Asian Journal highlighted the IPC's Q&A Guide to the President's deferred action policy:

Meanwhile, many organizations have formed seminars and briefings to help people better understand the Deferred Action Policy, how the process will work and who will benefit from it. One such organization is the Immigration Policy Center which held a tele-briefing on June 21 with experts who discussed the Administration’s legal authority behind this move, what’s currently known about the process and how politics are shaping up around the decision. Read more...

Published in the Asian Journal

Educator Workshops

The Community Education Center offers day-long Education Workshops to youth, educators and community leaders who are interested in integrating the subject of immigration into their communities, professional and educational spheres.

Each workshop features an immigration attorney who discusses the historical and contemporary aspects of immigration in the United States, an immigration activist/ author, educational experts and other expert lecturers. Workshops have been held in Washington, D.C., New York, Los Angeles, Philadelphia, Chicago, Miami and San Francisco.Read more...

IPC Cited in Washington Post

Published on Wed, Feb 20, 2013

An IPC report was cited in a recent article in the Washington Post on the Obama administrations push to give judges more leeway in deciding who can be deported:

"Under current law, non-citizen immigrants convicted of what’s known as an “aggravated felony” face automatic penalties that make it far harder for them to be spared from deportation. While the term suggests a crime of a serious and violent nature, the definition of an “aggravated felony” has been expanded over the years, to the point where it includes crimes that are neither “aggravated” nor “felonies.” Obama’s draft immigration bill would narrow the definition of an aggravated felony by giving immigration judges greater discretion to grant leniency to individual immigrants convicted of minor offenses.

Originally, only a small handful of serious crimes were classified as “aggravated felonies” in immigration law, but the definition was expanded in 1996 to encompass a host of other more minor offenses. “As initially enacted in 1988, the term ‘aggravated felony’ referred only to murder, federal drug trafficking, and illicit trafficking of certain firearms and destructive devices,” explains a brief from the Immigration Policy Center, an immigration advocacy group. “Today, the definition of ‘aggravated felony’ covers more than thirty types of offenses, including simple battery, theft, filing a false tax return, and failing to appear in court.”"

Published in the Washington Post

Roman Totenberg

Professor Emeritus of Music at Boston University

Across the continents and the span of seven decades, violinist Roman Totenberg has been singled out by critics as an outstanding violinist, a sensitive musician and a brilliant teacher. Roman Totenberg was born in Poland in 1911 and made his debut with the Warsaw Philharmonic when he was 11 years old. Soon after his Berlin debut, he was performing with every major European orchestra, making recordings and eventually playing with major orchestras in the United States, at the White House and the Library of Congress. His work as a chamber music performer was widely acclaimed when he played regularly with the New Friends of Music in New York and in 1940 when he became Director of live chamber music concerts for New York radio station WQXR. As a young artist he toured South America with Arthur Rubinstein and met composer Darius Milhaud after Totenberg's Paris debut which Milhaud had reviewed. More than two decades later, Totenberg, with the composer conducting, would play a premiere performance of Milhaud's 2nd Violin Concerto in Aspen, Colorado and in Berlin with the Berlin Philharmonic. These concerts were among a number of first performances of composers' works that Totenberg would play over the years.

Totenberg continues performing as a soloist with orchestra in recital and in chamber music concerts. As his reputation for concert performances has grown, so too has his reputation for fine teaching and musical expertise. In 1983, he was named Artist Teacher of the Year by the American String Teachers Association. Currently teaching at Boston University, he headed the String Department there from 1961 to 1978. He taught at the Mannes School of Music in New York, headed the string department of the Peabody Conservatory of Music, Baltimore, and the Longy School of Music which he was the Director from 1978 to 1985.Read more...

Brookings Report on DACA Cites IPC

Published on Wed, Aug 14, 2013

In their recent report, "Immigration Facts:  Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals," the Brookings Institution cited the IPC's estimate of the number of potentially eligible DACA Recipients.

"Estimates of the potentially eligible population calculated by the Immigration Policy Center (IPC) using age, country of birth, educational attainment and enrollment, and year of entry to the United States show approximately 936,000 immigrants were immediately eligible at the time of the announcement of the program. Eligibility criteria such as continuous residence and criminal history are much harder to approximate."

Published in the Brookings Institution

Jennifer Lynch, Esq.

Jennifer Lynch, Esq. is a staff attorney with the Electronic Frontier Foundation and works on open government, transparency and privacy issues as part of EFF’s FOIA Litigation for Accountable Government (FLAG) Project. In addition to government transparency, Jennifer has written and spoken frequently on government surveillance programs, intelligence community misconduct, and biometrics collection. Prior to joining EFF, Jennifer was the Clinical Teaching Fellow with the Samuelson Law, Technology & Public Policy Clinic at UC Berkeley School of Law. She has published academically on identity theft and phishing attacks and sovereign immunity in civil rights cases.

AIC Executive Director Benjamin Johnson Quoted in New Republic

Published on Thu, Apr 17, 2014

AIC Executive Director Benjamin Johnson was recently quoted in the New Republic article "Who's the Real Deporter-In-Chief: Bush or Obama?" Johnson emphasized the need to not only review deportation numbers but the results of current enforcement policies.

I don’t know why we’re having a conversation about the numbers—the question is, what are the results?” said Benjamin Johnson of the American Immigration Council. “As somebody who cares about immigration policy, it’s a weird and unfortunate construct. I think the people calling him deporter-in-chief are doing it because he’s punishing them through the immigration system.”

Published in the New Republic

American Immigration Council's Yearly Top Accomplishments

Scroll down to learn more about the accomplishments that we are most proud of for each year.

 

2011Read more...

Journalists Who Revealed Sheriff Arpaio's Activities Win Pulitzer Prize

Released on Sun, Apr 19, 2009

Today, reporters Ryan Gabrielson and Paul Giblin of the East Valley Tribune in Mesa, Arizona (Giblin is now with the Arizona Guardian) were awarded a Pulitzer Prize for their local reporting on Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio. The award-winning series revealed the Sheriff's "focus on immigration enforcement and how it endangered investigation of violent crime and other aspects of public safety," says the Pulitzer website.

View Release

Lisa S. Roney

Lisa S. Roney retired in 2009 as Director of the Research and Evaluation Division of the Office of Policy and Strategy at U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) following 39 years as a policy analyst and manager with USCIS and the legacy Immigration and Naturalization Service.  She served on the staff of the Interagency Task Force on Immigration Law and Policy and was a Senior Research Associate with the Select Commission on Immigration and Refugee Policy. She was responsible for monitoring and reporting on implementation of the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986 and research on the legalized immigrant population.  She is currently an independent immigration consultant working with Westat on evaluation of electronic employment verification programs. She received a B.A. from Hood College and an M.P.A. from American University.