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Immigrants' ledger has two sides

Published on Sat, Aug 06, 2011

As Hazleton's ill-considered anti-immigration ordinance migrates to the 3rd Circuit Court of Appeals for further arguments, it continues to be based partially on a false premise.

The ordinance results partially from the notion that illegal immigrants are an economic drain and a service burden on the government.

That view, however, is rooted in only one side of the ledger. An analysis by the Immigration Policy Center recently detailed how tax-paying illegal immigrants bolster government treasuries.

In Pennsylvania alone, the analysis found, families headed by illegal immigrants pay $135 million a year in state and local taxes - nearly $35 million in state and local wage and income taxes, more than $7 million in property taxes and more than $81 million in sales taxes.

The analysis does not count another substantial contribution. The national debate over "entitlement" reform usually fails to note the huge surplus for Social Security generated by illegal immigrants. Earlier this year Stephen Goss, chief actuary for Social Security, estimated that illegal immigrant workers contribute about $12 billion a year to the trust fund.

By law illegal immigrants may not collect Social Security benefits, so their contributions are a net gain. The contribution is even more significant because of demographics: illegal immigrants generally are much younger than the average American worker.

None of that diminishes the need for rational immigration reform at the federal level. But it does call for greater context to the debate.

Published in the The Times-Tribune

Impact on J-1 Programs in the Event of a Federal Government Shutdown

October 1, 2013 - As the US Congress delays approving a budget for FY 2014, it is possible that tax funded “non-essential” services will be suspended.  “Non-essential” services are those that are not considered to be a health or security concern.

Read on to learn areas that may impact our exchange visitors in J status: Read more...

Quick Fact: U.S. Citizen children are supported by unautorized immigrants

There are 4 million U.S. citizen children living in mixed status families with at least one parent who is an unauthorized immigrant.

Breaking the law applies equally

Published on Fri, Oct 28, 2011

Alabama politicians told the people that illegal immigrants cost the state $112 million a year, according to the Federation for American Immigration Reform. But the Immigration Policy Center also reports that illegal immigrants spend $130 million a year. Why was this not brought out?

 People say they are tired of illegal immigrants taking Alabama jobs, but how many state contracts have been awarded to out-of-state companies?

 How much money and how many teachers, farmers and other workers will lose their jobs? We get so much money per student and the state is already cutting back. How much more will they cut?

 We need to take a minute and look at Detroit and remember that that city once relied heavily on the auto industry; now some parts of the city have empty buildings. The auto industry is wonderful, but how many people do you know who are buying new cars in this economy?

 We need to protect our farmers and help our neighbors. If we are going to be immigration officers, are we going to start paying the Coast Guard and the federal employees, or are we going to let the federal government do it? They are not perfect, but if we start taking matters into our own hands, then we are no different than the immigrants. Breaking the law is the same for everyone, states included.

Published in the The Anniston Star

Council Ambassadors

Name

Maurice "Mo" Goldman
Heather N. Segal
Laura Burton
B. John Ovink
Ian David Wagreich
Kirby Gamblin Joseph
Eric Fleischmann
KahBo Dye-Chiew
John A. Broyles
Greg Minter
Laura Devine
David K. Wenger
Kathleen Gasparian
Michele Garnet MacKenzie           
James W. Austin
M. Edwin Prud'homme
Mary Holper
Melinda Basaran
David Katona
Helen Hui
Karen Moss
Dagmar Butte
Matthew Baxter
Mark T. Knapp
Diana Vellos Coker
Marcine Seid
Ally Bolour
Noemi Ramirez
Antonia L. Canero
Rick Gump
Joanne Macri
Andrew T. Chan
Joel H. Paget
Leslie Velez
Anita Sorensen
Chapter

Arizona
Canada
Carolinas
Central Florida
Chicago
Colorado
Connecticut
Hawaii
Indiana
Iowa/Nebraska
London
Michigan
Mid-South
Minnesota/Dakotas
Missouri/Kansas
Nevada
New England
New Jersey
New York
Northern California
Ohio
Oregon
Philadelphia
Pittsburgh
San Diego
Santa Clara
Southern California
Southern California
Southern Florida
Texas
Upstate New York
Washington State
Washington State
Washington, D.C.
Wisconsin

E-Verify a bothersome but not insurmountable chore for area businesses

Published on Sat, Jan 14, 2012

 

Steve Hale of Hale Building Company in Anniston only wants to hire legal workers. He wants to comply with all laws.

But to him, the state is just not making it very easy.

Hale Building Company was one of many Alabama businesses with government contracts that were required to enroll with the E-Verify system this month to comply with the state’s immigration law. E-Verify is a free Internet service offered by the federal government that lets companies check the working status of employees by comparing a worker’s name to official records.

Hale said the process to enroll in the system, and just complying with the immigration law in general, has been difficult.

“There is a good bit of time needed to switch over to it,” Hale said. “And there is just a lot of confusion about what is to be done. But we’ve made a very valiant effort to conform to the new law.”

Hale said he does not agree with the way the state has implemented the law, which was passed last year and considered the toughest immigration legislation in the country.

“It seems like politicians could have done a better job to phase things in and explain them,” Hale said. “And we’re being asked to be the police of the industry, but we’re not in business to track these people down.”

Lance Taylor, president of the Taylor Corporation in Oxford, whose company also had to enroll in E-Verify this month, agreed with Hale that much of the immigration law is confusing.

“Every time they come out with something different, the lawyers try to keep us abreast with what we can and can’t do,” Taylor said. “There was just so much confusion when it first came out.”

John Bryan, vice president of the Sunny King Auto Group in Anniston, said his company also enrolled with E-Verify this month as a precautionary measure.Read more...

Published in the The Anniston, AL Star

Contest Coordinators for the 2011 "Celebrate America" Creative Writing Contest

If you are interested in participating in the 2011 Creative Writing Contest and are the parent or educator of fifth grade students please contact your local coordinator to get started.  Or email teacher@immcouncil.org for more information.

Atlanta
Theresa Bailey Kennedy
tkennedy@fspklaw.com
404-320-7000

California
Los Angeles
Maggie Castillo
mcastillo@mbc4law.com
323-725-0350


Los Angeles
Silvia Martinez
silvia.martinezlawoffice@gmail.com
213-488-1457


San Diego
Kimberley Best Robidoux
krobidoux@larrabee.com
858-642-0420


San Diego
Liz Sweet
sweete@staff.abanet.org
619-699-2930


San Francisco
Brenda Boudreaux
aicessay@ailanorcal.com
510-928-0773 

Santa Clara Valley
Randall Caudle
randall@caudleimmigration.com
415-541-9290


Colorado
Chris Pooley
cpooley2007@gmail.com
970-845-7474Read more...

Copycat immigration enforcement bill dies in Mississippi Senate

Published on Wed, Apr 04, 2012

An immigration enforcement bill that contains the same type of provisions that have Arizona’s S.B. 1070 poised for a Supreme Court hearing died Tuesday in the Mississippi Senate.

Immigration Works, a national organization “advancing immigration reform that works for all Americans – employers, workers and citizens,” said Tuesday in a press release that “Mississippi isn’t the only state to hesitate on immigration this year. Lawmakers across the country are holding off. Some are waiting to see how the U.S. Supreme Court rules in its second immigration federalism case in so many years, U.S. v Arizona.”
The Supreme Court will hear arguments about Arizona’s law, known as S.B. 1070, on April 25.

S.B. 1070 has served as a model for other states and has brought to the forefront questions about how states can enforce existing federal immigration laws.

Immigration Works described “what made the difference in Mississippi”: “Business leaders and law enforcement officials spoke out persuasively, expressing concerns about the consequences of HB 488. The employer coalition that opposed the bill included the Mississippi Farm Bureau, the Mississippi Poultry Association, the state chapter of the Associated Builders and Contractors and several foresting and nursery groups, as well as blueberry and sweet potato growers.” (Read the full press release below.)

The Immigration Policy Center writes that H.B. 488 “would have, among other things, allowed police officers to determine the immigration status of individuals they ‘reasonably suspect’ are in the country without documents. While HB 488 is dead, however, state House members may still be looking to keep these immigration enforcement measures alive by inserting them in other bills.”Read more...

Published in the Florida Independent

The LAC Docket | Volume II, Issue 1

The Newsletter of the American Immigration Council’s Legal Action Center

December 21, 2011
Our Work | Requests for Evidence | Quick Links | Donate

OUR WORK

Systemic Reforms

 

  Systemic Reforms


LAC files class action lawsuit targeting asylum “clock”

A.B.T. et al. v. U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services et al., No. 11-2108 (W.D. Wash. filed December 15, 2011).

Last week, the American Immigration Council’s Legal Action Center (LAC) filed a nationwide class action complaint against U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) and the Executive Office for Immigration Review (EOIR) alleging widespread problems with the asylum “clock”—the system used by immigration officials to determine when noncitizens with pending asylum applications become eligible to obtain work authorization in the United States.Read more...

Will a new immigration policy get Latinos to the polls?

Published on Fri, Jun 15, 2012

Mary Giovagnoli, director of the IPC, was quoted in a BBC article discussing the Administration's new policy offering deferred action to "DREAMers," young people brought to this country by their parents and fit certain criteria : Read more...

Published in the BBC