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Susan Pierce, Ph.D.

Susan Pierce, Ph.D. is Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology, Thomas Harriot College of Arts and Sciences, East Carolina University.  

Reena Tandon teaches South Asian Studies at University of Toronto and has been affiliated with Ryerson University to teach at School of Social Work and to integrate Curricular Service Learning in the Faculty of Arts.

Elizabeth Clifford is Associate Professor of Sociology at Towson University and Director of American Studies and Coordinator of the Baltimore Immigration Summit.

 

Want to Stall, not Stimulate, the Economy?

Released on Wed, Feb 04, 2009

Efforts by anti-immigrant groups to persuade Congress to expand the E-Verify program as part of the economic stimulus bill would hinder, not help, the U.S. economy's recovery. IPC’s analysis shows that any attempt to expand E-Verify overnight would be a costly and chaotic mistake that would neither help the economy nor fix our broken immigration system.

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The Impact of "Quick Fixes" on U.S. Citizens and the Economy

Released on Wed, Mar 26, 2008

Proposals regarding employment verification for all workers – foreign- and U.S.-born alike – are gathering steam in Congress. IPC’s new OnPoint documents highlight the impact recently proposed immigration enforcement tools would have on U.S. citizens, authorized workers, and the economy.

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Anti-Immigrant Group Recommends Economic Self-Destruction for Arizona

Released on Tue, May 18, 2010

Washington D.C. - In data released "exclusively to FoxNews.com," the Federation for American Immigration Reform (FAIR) - architects of the new Arizona law SB1070 - claim that unauthorized immigrants in Arizona are costing the state's taxpayers $2.7 billion per year for education, medical care, and incarceration. The release of this "fiscal analysis" takes advantage of the absence of any legitimate economic analysis by the state on what SB1070 will cost. However, judging from FAIR's track record when it comes to these kinds of state estimates, it is likely that their numbers are virtually meaningless. In its most recent state studies on unauthorized immigration in Maryland, Pennsylvania, and Virginia, for instance, FAIR has dramatically exaggerated the fiscal "costs" imposed by unauthorized immigrants by including schooling and medical care for their native-born, U.S.-citizen children in its estimate, and conveniently forgetting to account for the economic role that unauthorized workers play as consumers who help support local economies.Read more...

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House Subcommittee on Immigration Policy and Enforcement

A Preview of What's to Come

Released on Wed, Jan 26, 2011

Washington D.C.Today, the newly named House Subcommittee on Immigration Policy and Enforcement held its first hearing of the new session entitled, "ICE Worksite Enforcement - Up to the Job?" The name change seems to be a signal that Judiciary Committee Chairman Lamar Smith and Subcommittee Chairman Elton Gallegly will focus on enforcement, rather than immigration reform this session. It is hardly surprising, then, that the first hearing of the year was designed to challenge the Obama administration's decision to move from the massive worksite raids of the past to the use of employer worksite audits. Read more...

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Are States Training Law Enforcement to Implement Restrictive Immigration Laws?

Released on Fri, Jun 24, 2011

Washington, D.C. - While many states legislatures rejected Arizona-style immigration laws this year in anticipation of high costs, legal challenges and charges of racial profiling, others states—like Georgia, Alabama and South Carolina—passed laws requiring law enforcement to determine the immigration status of anyone that is stopped or detained for any offense. Civil rights groups have sued in Georgia and Alabama and plan to challenge South Carolina’s law once the bill is signed. Federal courts found similar laws in Arizona and Utah unconstitutional and issued injunctions, baring law enforcement from implementing the laws. 

With lawsuits pending, however, local officials are now in a position of having to prepare for possible implementation of immigration laws. Local law enforcement, for example, is struggling to interpret the laws and provide training to officers—a struggle which could be further complicated if courts allow only some parts of the law to go forward.  In some cases, training is simply not taking place. Officials in Georgia are waiting for a judge’s ruling before training officers on the law, slated to take effect July 1st. Which begs the question, how, if at all, are law enforcement officers being trained in other states where similar laws have passed?Read more...

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