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Meet the immigrant Olympians

Published on Mon, Jul 30, 2012

IPC's Immigration Impact blog was referred to by Southern California Public Radio's Leslie Berestein Rojas in her own blog about immigration and cultural fusion in Southern California.  The article gives tribute to the diverse US athletes participating in this year's exciting Olympic Games: Read more...

Published in the Southern California Public Radio: Multi-American

Guidelines for entering the "Celebrate America" Creative Writing Contest

Past winners have used the theme “Why I am Glad America is a Nation of Immigrants” to discuss their personal immigration experiences, learn about and share family histories or write about the broader questions of the challenges facing immigrants in a new land. Fifth grade students enter their work in local contests which are sponsored by chapters of the American Immigration Lawyers Association (AILA). Each chapter forwards the local winning entry to the National Competition where entries are reviewed by a distinguished panel including U.S. senators, award-winning authors and noted journalists. Winning entries are to be printed in the Congressional Record. The grand prize winner and two guests (including one parent/guardian) will receive an all-expenses-paid trip to the Council’s Annual Benefit Dinner where the winner will be recognized and will recite the winning piece. Local and national judges are looking for student writing that is original, thoughtful and speaks to the Council’s mission to educate the public about the benefits of immigration to our society.

Check for a local contest and local deadlines.  The national deadline for local winners is April 12, 2013.

CWC 2012 logo

GUIDELINES

Theme: "Why I Am Glad America is a Nation of Immigrants"

Entrants: 5th graders

Format:

  • Any written entry (essay, poem, story, interview, etc.) that reflects the theme
  • Entry should be submitted to your contest coordinator (some local contests require electronic submissions, so please check with your coordinator).

Word count: Up to 500 wordsRead more...

Two Systems of Justice Paper Highlighted in Voxxi and the Huffington Post

Published on Thu, Mar 21, 2013

The IPC and LAC's Special Report, "Two Systems of Justice:  How the Immigration System Falls Short of American Ideals of Justice," was highlighted in a piece by Voxxi, which was then reposted by the Huffington Post:

"The United States’ justice system is supposed to operate equally for all defendants, but a new report reveals that the immigration system operates under a different set of rules for immigrants facing deportation.

The American Immigration Council issued on Tuesday a report that reveals the immigration system fails to provide “a fair process” to immigrants in removal proceedings and “lacks nearly all of the procedural safeguards we rely on and value in the U.S. justice system.” The report, titled “Two Systems of Justice: How the Immigration System Falls Short of the Ideals of Justice”, also explores the major operational differences between the criminal justice system and the immigration removal system."

You can read the full report here.

Published in the Voxxi

Shahriar Pourdanesh

Shahriar Pourdanesh (known as Shar Pourdanesh to his many Redskin fans), was born in Iran. He came to the United States with his family after leaving Iran during the Iranian revolution in 1979. He attended University High School in Irvine, California where he was an all-league offensive lineman and was the fourth-ranked heavyweight wrestler in the state. He attended college at the University of Nevada in Reno where he was a dominant offensive lineman. As a senior in 1992, he was named to the first team All-Conference for the Big West Conference.

Shar joined the Redskins after two seasons with the Baltimore Stallions of the Canadian Football League (CFL) and is the first Iranian to play NFL football. In 1994 Shar was named CFL Offensive Lineman of the Year for the Baltimore Stallions and was named to the CFL all-star team in 1994 and 1995. During the 1996 Redskins' season Shar proved a very versatile player, playing both left tackle and right tackle.

The IPC's Guillermo Cantor Featured in Aging Today

Published on Wed, Aug 28, 2013

Guillermo Cantor, the Senior Policy Analyst at the Immigration Policy Center, was published in Aging Today in an article titled, "Will Immigration Reform Address Our Need for Eldercare Workers?"

In it, Cantor writes:

"The implications of S. 744 are manifold. First, by offering a path to citizenship for undocumented workers currently living in the country, the bill would certainly help stabilize the direct care workforce, which would in turn improve the quality of care. In particular, as a 2011 report by the National Council on Aging (NCOA) and the National Hispanic Council on Aging (NHCOA) has shown, once unauthorized care workers become legalized, they can legally drive, undergo enhanced background checks and access better opportunities for training and career advancement.

While the legalization of undocumented workers constitutes a significant step forward in strengthening the direct care workforce of current undocumented workers, the bill’s implications for the future flow of immigrant care workers must also be considered. Several signs suggest that the new legal immigration system created by S. 744 falls short of providing a sustainable solution to the eldercare shortage."

Published in the Aging Today

Kristin Johnson, Ph.D.

Kristin Johnson, Ph.D., joined the Political Science Department at the University of Rhode Island as an Assistant Professor in the Fall of 2007. She received her Ph.D. from Claremont Graduate University in 2007. Her current research interests include the relationship between state capabilities and internal conflict, and resource distribution and development. She is the former Co‐Editor of International Interactions and a member of the TransPacific Consortium. At URI, Kristin teaches courses in International Political Economy, Comparative Politics, and Civil Conflict.

 

New York Times Highlights Council Report as "A Blueprint For Action"

Published on Sun, May 11, 2014

The New York Times published an editorial calling for more transparency within Customs and Border Protection based on the Immigration Policy Center's report "No Action Taken: Lack of CBP Accountability in Responding to Complaints of Abuse".

The editorial stated: "If a Border Patrol agent beats, kicks, threatens or otherwise abuses you, you can file a complaint. What you can’t count on, evidently, is anything being done about it.

That is the sorry conclusion of a study released last week by the American Immigration Council, an advocacy organization in Washington. The council sought to collect data about abuse complaints against the Border Patrol — a difficult task, given the lack of transparency at Customs and Border Protection, the agency within the Department of Homeland Security to which the Border Patrol belongs.

The council had to sue under the Freedom of Information Act to obtain records of 809 complaints between January 2009 and January 2012. The accusations varied widely — of migrants kicked and stomped after being detained, struck in the face and head with flashlights and other objects, sexually groped, improperly strip-searched, verbally abused."

Published in the New York Times

Application Resources

APPLY FOR J-1 VISA SPONSORSHIP

Are you a potential J-1 intern or trainee?  A US company, institution or organization looking to host an international exchange visitor?  An immigration attorney representing a host company or individual foreign national interested in the J-1 visa?  The International Exchange Center is here to assist you in navigating the J-1 process. We provide resources to help you design the ideal training program to meet your needs.


LINKS AND RESOURCESRead more...

DREAM Act Introduction Shows Political Muscle for Immigration Reform

Released on Thu, Mar 26, 2009

With yesterday's bipartisan introduction of the DREAM Act, the House and Senate delivered yet another signal that the political tide for immigration reform is getting stronger. The bill seeks to remedy the predicament of a specific group of undocumented children who are blocked from realizing their full potential. By providing a path to U.S. citizenship, the DREAM Act would allow these children to pursue a higher education and contribute fully to our economy.

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Immigrant Entrepreneurs, Innovation, and Welcoming Initiatives by State

 

Alabama                                 

Alaska                                      

 


AZ Thumb

Arizona                         

Arkansas

 Read more...