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Arizona's next immigration debate: babies born in U.S.

Published on Thu, Dec 16, 2010

In an article written for the Immigration Policy Center, lawyer Elizabeth Wydra contends that the reason for the 14th Amendment was to make sure that future legislators could not strip citizenship rights from vulnerable minorities.

Published in the Stateline

Litigation Clearinghouse Newsletter Vol. 2, No. 14

This issue covers recent decisions on INA

Published On: Wednesday, December 5, 2007 | Download File

Austin Texas 2011 Creative Writing Contest Winners

Austin Texas "Celebrates America"

Published on Tue, May 17, 2011

Austin winners of the local "Celebrate America" 5th Grade Creative Writing Contest were honored at a Naturalization Ceremony at Austin Delco Activity Center on Tuesday, April 26, 2011. The Contest winners were presented with their awards, and had the opportunity to read their winning entries in front of 984 new U.S. citizens from 105 different countries taking the oath of citizenship before District Judge Lee Yeakel.

Published in the Foster Quan

Litigation Clearinghouse Newsletter Vol. 1, No. 4

This issue covers developments concerning mandatory detention, Supreme Court Update, and Motions to Stop Deportations to Haiti.

Published On: Tuesday, January 24, 2006 | Download File

Advocates & Opponents Of Comprehensive Immigration Reform Criticize Obama

Published on Fri, Apr 15, 2011

SAN DIEGO — The Washington-based Immigration Policy Center advocates a centrist policy of enforcement coupled with a path to citizenship. It has released a report card on the Obama Administration.

The center cites tension between enforcement and reform priorities, and calls out Obama's failure to fulfill his promise of comprehensive reform.

"While the president on the one hand is saying that he understands that we need immigration reform, his focus has been deporting people," said Michele Waslin, a senior policy analyst with the center. "And in some cases, deporting those very people that he really hopes to legalize someday."

The center cites a record number of deportations under Obama and criticizes the lack of effort to find ways for longtime, productive undocumented immigrants and their children to remain in the country.

"The president has said several times that all he can do is enforce the law. When we think that the president certainly has other executive powers--there are things that can be done administratively within current law that would also help to reform the system from within," Waslin said.

She added the chances of an Obama-led immigration reform by the end of his first term are minimal.

On the other hand, summarizing the president's performance on immigration issues, the conservative Center for Immigration Studies believes it's been all for show.

Mark Krikorian, Executive Director of the Washington-based Center for Immigration Studies, said that the Obama administration has increased deportations and security at the border. But it has not gone far enough given the reality of increasing violence in Mexico.

"The unspoken factor underlying much of the immigration debate is the ongoing, low-level civil war within Mexico," said Krikorian. "Every time another ditch full of 100 bodies is found, makes the cause of weakening enforcement that much more difficult."Read more...

Published in the KPBS

State and Local Law Enforcement

ARCHIVED ISSUE PAGE (LAST UPDATED OCTOBER 2011)

An increasing number of states and local communities have passed laws targeting non-citizens in the United States, creating obstacles to their ability to find work, secure housing, qualify for a driver’s license, and even obtain a marriage license.  With increasing success, immigrant advocates have challenged many of these measures in court.  A summary of the cases are below. 

Contact Us! Please contact the Clearinghouse at clearinghouse@immcouncil.org with any new cases or information relevant to the cases summarized below.

Developments By State|Additional Resources

Alabama|Arizona|California|Georgia|Illinois|Indiana|Kentucky|
Louisiana
|Massachusetts|MichiganMissouri|Nebraska|New Jersey|
New York
|Oklahoma|Pennsylvania|Tennessee|Texas|Utah

Contact Us! Please contact the Clearinghouse at clearinghouse@immcouncil.org with any new cases or information relevant to the cases summarized below.

Developments By State

AlabamaRead more...

Bronwyn's American Dream

December, 2010

The International Exchange Center is proud to announce Bronwyn Cambridge as this month’s Exchange Visitor of the Month. Each month, we select an exchange visitor who has made an effort to get involved in his/her community and explore American culture. 

Read more...

Educated Immigrants Outnumber Low-Skilled Ones in U.S.

Published on Fri, Jun 10, 2011

The word "immigrant" often conjures up the negative images of low-skilled and likely illegally residing workers. As Benjamin Johnson, executive director of the American Immigration Council tells the Washington Post, "too often the immigration debate is driven by images on television of people jumping over fences." Yet a new report from the Brookings Institution pushes back against this stereotype, showing there are actually more college-educated immigrants of working age in the United States than those without high-school degrees.

To help understand the chart above, it's useful to look at Brookings terminology. Low-skilled immigrants are those that do not possess a high-school diploma, while high-skilled immigrants are those with a college degree, or more. The shift in the past few decades has been significant: "In 1980, just 19 percent of immigrants aged 25 to 64 held a bachelor's degree, and nearly 40 percent had not completed high school," the report states. By 2010 that 40 percent was down to 28 percent, while the percentage of immigrants holding BAs rose to 30. Mid-skilled immigrants--those that have a high school diploma or some college and no degree--are still the largest group, though the percentage has held pretty steady since the early 90's. It's worth adding that Brookings methodology did not distinguish between illegal and legal immigrants; birthplace was the sole determination of immigrant status.

It looks like good news, but not everyone sees the report as encouraging. "New college graduates are faring very poorly on the labor market, and what the report is telling us is that we're bringing in a high number of workers to compete with them," Steven Camarota, director of research at the Center for Immigration Studies, a self-described "pro-immigrant, low-immigration," think-tank in Washington D.C told the Post.

Published in the Atlantic Monthly