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Poll indicates Latinos alienated by GOP

Published on Wed, Oct 06, 2010

According to the most recent data from the 2010 Census, Latinos make up 11.5 percent of Utah’s population. The Immigration Policy Center revealed 32 percent of immigrants in Utah in 2008 were naturalized citizens who can vote. That number continues to rise.

Published in the Salt Lake City Examiner

Criminal Alien Program (CAP)

CAP is a massive, nationwide enforcement program administered by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) that identifies removable noncitizens and places them into removal proceedings.  CAP is currently active in all state and federal prisons, as well as more than 300 local jails throughout the country.  The program is implicated in approximately half of all removal proceedings.  Although CAP supposedly focuses on the worst criminal offenders, the program appears to target individuals with little or no criminal history and to incentivize pretextual stops and racial profiling.  Despite CAP's role in facilitating the removal of hundreds of thousands of individuals each year, and despite serving as ICE's “bedrock” enforcement initiative, very little information about CAP is available to the public.

Seeking greater transparency, the American Immigration Council (AIC), in collaboration with the Worker and Immigrant Rights Advocacy Clinic of Yale Law School and the Connecticut chapter of the American Immigration Lawyers Association (AILA), brought a lawsuit under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) to compel the release of records that would shed light on the program.  Pursuant to a court-approved settlement, ICE must begin producing responsive, non-exempt records by late October 2013.

CASESRESOURCES

CASES

The LAC and the Worker and Immigrant Rights Advocacy Clinic of Yale Law School Sue to Compel Release of CAP Records

American Immigration Council, et al., v. DHS, No. 12-00355 (D. Conn. filed Mar. 8, 2012).Read more...

Birthright Citizenship’s Unlikely Road to Supreme Court

Published on Wed, Dec 22, 2010

“Those children can’t petition for their parents to become U.S. citizens until they are 21 years old and it most cases, the parents would be barred from getting a visa to the United States for 10 years,” said Michelle Waslin, senior policy analyst at the American Immigration Council's Immigration Policy Center in Washington, D.C. “So that’s a 31-year plan. It doesn’t seem like it’s a very good plan to legalize your status here in the U.S. It doesn’t protect them from deportation.”

Published in the Hartford Guardian

Litigation Clearinghouse Newsletter Vol. 3, No. 2

This issue covers recently filed lawsuits involving access to counsel at immigration interviews, abuse of minors in detention, and the border fence between the U.S. and Mexico. The newsletter also includes updates on the Duran Gonzales class action in the Ninth Circuit (involving 245(i) and I-212s), Matter of Blake litigation, and the class action suit to restore SSI benefits for refugees and asylees.

Published On: Tuesday, February 26, 2008 | Download File

Houston Students Take Part in Naturalization Ceremonies

Published on Thu, May 05, 2011

District Director Sandra Heathman will introduce three award winning essay writers at an N-600 Oath Ceremony that will be attended by 20 new citizens. The fifth grade winners wrote an essay, sponsored by the American Immigration Council on the theme, “Why I am Glad America is a Country of Immigrants.” The winners will read their winning essays. The new citizens have already had their N-600 Application for Certificate of Citizenship granted, and will obtain their Certificates.

Published in the USCIS Houston | View PDF

Litigation Clearinghouse Newsletter Vol. 1, No. 7

This issue covers Supreme Court arguments in reinstatement case, filing fee increases at the court of appeals, and REAL ID Act's effect on jurisdiction over APA actions in district court.

Published On: Wednesday, March 22, 2006 | Download File

Undocumented Immigrants Pay More In Taxes Than Wealthy

Published on Tue, Apr 19, 2011

A new study released by the Immigration Policy Center for tax day shows that at least half of the undocumented immigrants in this country pay income taxes. Add that to the sales and property taxes that those undocumented persons also pay and undocumented immigrants pay more in taxes than most wealthy Americans.

The total amount of tax revenue collected in state and local taxes is approximately $11.2 billion, including $1.2 billion in personal income taxes, $1.6 billion in property taxes and $8.4 billion in sales taxes.

The numbers don't come as much of a surprise to those who track immigration policy. According to Wendy Sefsaf, communications director for the American Immigration Council, the current political movement to restrict, criminalize and punish immigrants will come at a steep price to states.

According to Sefsaf "[t]he restrictionist movement in the U.S. spends all their time letting everyone know how much [undocumented immigrants] cost us, and they try to ignore the fact that they contribute. We are not trying to say there are not costs associated with people. There are costs associated with everyone. But we are trying to balance out the debate."

States like Florida, for example, which collects about $806.8 million from unauthorized immigrants and does not have a state income tax would certainly feel the impact should a significant amount of that population leave. That revenue comes from immigrants buying groceries, rent and other necessities subject to sales and property taxes.

The bottom line is to suggest that undocumented immigrants are nothing but a revenue suck on states is simply wrong. While that will likely not change the conversation for those who have committed to making attacking immigrants the wedge issue of the moment, as Sefsaf notes, the only way to have an honest conversation about changing immigration policy is with a full set of facts.

Published in the Care 2.com