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In D.C., a Push to Aid Irish Migrants

Published on Wed, Mar 21, 2012

WASHINGTON - Congress may have finally found an immigration issue it can agree on in an election year: letting in more Irish people.

At a time when the volatile issue of comprehensive immigration reform is hopelessly stalled in a divided Congress, senators of both parties are rallying behind legislation that would allow 10,500 Irish nationals to come to the U.S. to work each year.

The legislation by Sen. Scott Brown, R-Mass., has been attacked by critics as a cynical ploy to win Irish-American votes as Brown battles for re-election in a state where one in four residents is of Irish descent. It also has been decried by both pro-immigration and anti-immigration groups as an example of favoritism toward European immigrants over Hispanics and Asians.

But supporters of the bill, including Democratic Sen. Charles Schumer of New York, say they are trying to help reverse discrimination against Irish nationals that was inadvertently created by a 1965 overhaul of the U.S. immigration system.

That overhaul, designed to end a bias against immigrants from Latin America, Asia and Africa, made it difficult for Irish immigrants to obtain visas despite their strong cultural ties to the U.S., say supporters of Brown's bill. Hispanics and Asians have been the dominant immigrant groups to the U.S. since 1965 and, as they become citizens, their close family members have been given priority for U.S. visas as part of the U.S. government's emphasis on family reunification.

About 40 million Americans identify themselves as being of Irish descent, or about 13 percent of the U.S. population of more than 313 million. Hispanics make up about 16 percent of U.S. residents. The number of Irish immigrants granted permanent legal status in the U.S. has plunged from nearly 38,000 in the 1960s to about 16,000 in the 10 years from 2000 through 2009.Read more...

Published in the The Arizona Republic

International Exchange Center Programs

INTERNATIONAL EXCHANGE CENTER PROGRAMS

The J-1 Visa: Changing America, Changing the World

The Role of the J-1 Trainee/Intern

Interns and Trainees

The Department of State's J-1 Visa Basics


 

THE ROLE OF THE J-1 TRAINEE OR INTERN

Sometimes, it is easy to become confused about the role of the trainee or intern within the host organization.

The trainee/intern’s role is to:

• Learn about the U.S. host organization
• Learn the specific skills and knowledge laid out in the DS-7002 training plan under constant watch of a supervisor
• Gain a new understanding of U.S. culture
• Share their home culture with colleagues and friends

J-1 visa regulations are very specific. A J-1 intern or trainee program should never include more than 20% clerical work or be used in place of regular employment. J-1 trainees and interns are not at will employees.Read more...

The new meaning of minority in Oregon

Published on Sat, May 26, 2012

Numbers from the IPC State Fact Sheets were used in an editorial written by the Oregonian Editors about the importance of immigrants in their state: Read more...

Published in the The Oregonian

Kendell K. Frederick

Army Specialist Kendell K. Frederick was born on August 17, 1984 on the island of Trinidad. There he lived with his grandfather and great grandparents, while his mother Michelle Frederick Murphy migrated to the United States to make a better life for her and her son.

In January 1999, at the age of fifteen, Kendell immigrated to the U.S. to join his mother and family in Randallstown, Maryland. There he was welcomed by his mother, his stepfather Kenmore Murphy, and his two sisters, Kennisha and Kendra. The entire family had looked forward to that day for a very long time.

Kendell attended Old Court Middle School, and upon graduating, attended Randallstown senior High School. There he was introduced to the R.O.T.C. program and decided to give it a try. He loved being in a leadership role, and stayed committed to the R.O.T.C. program for the entire four years.

In 2001, while in his last year of high school, Kendell decided to enlist in the army reserve, and that summer entered basic training at Fort Sill Oklahoma, where he graduated on July 17, 2002.

Upon returning home, Kendell entered Aberdeen and obtained his degree in generator engineering. In February of 2004, he was assigned to the Army reserve's 983rd Engineer Battalion, based in Monclova, Ohio. From there he was deployed to Iraq in December 2004 to work on power generators. His unit, which specializes in construction of roads and infrastructure, depended on him to operate and maintain the portable electrical sources needed to perform their work.Read more...

After run-in with law, Cambodian immigrant’s permanent residency is at risk

Published on Thu, Oct 04, 2012

The IPC's Ben Winograd was quoted in a Washington Post article about the deportation of Legal Permanent Residents:

Read more...

Published in the The Washington Post

Hannah Gill, Ph.D.

Hannah Gill, Ph.D. is Research Associate at the Center for Global Initiatives and Assistant Director at the Institute of Latin American Studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Hannah received her doctorate in Social Anthropology with a specialization in Latin American migration from the University of Oxford, England in 2004. She is a native of Alamance County, North Carolina and alumna of UNC Chapel Hill. She is co‐author of the publication, "Going to Carolina de Norte, narrating Mexican migrant experiences” and the author of The Latino Migration Experience in North Carolina, available at UNC Press.

The IPC's Mary Giovagnoli in Chicago Sun-Times

Published on Sun, Jun 16, 2013

Mary Giovagnoli, the Director of the Immigration Policy Center, was quoted in a recent article in the Chicago Sun-Times on Senator John Cornyn's proposed border amendments in the Senate immigration bill:

"Sen. John Cornyn (R-Texas) wants to halt the legalization of undocumented immigrants after a required 10-year wait if border security fails to meet potentially unattainable standards.

"He might as well say he is against immigration reform. His plan would effectively kill it, which is why some, including Sen. John McCain (R-Arizona), have called his proposal a poison pill.

“'It becomes a way to say we can’t move forward,' said Mary Giovagnoli, director of the Washington, D.C.-based Immigration Policy Center."

Published in the Chicago Sun-Times

Peter Schrag

Peter Schrag, for many years the editorial page editor and later a weekly columnist for the Sacramento Bee, currently contributes to The Nation, Harper's, The Los Angeles Times, and other publications. He is a visiting scholar at the Institute for Governmental Studies at the University of California at Berkeley and the author of several books, including Paradise Lost and California: America's High‐Stakes Experiment and Final Test: The Battle for Adequacy in America's Schools. This article is drawn from Peter Schrag’s Not Fit for Our Society: Immigration and Nativism in America, University of California Press, 2010.

IPC Data Cited in New York's Henrietta Post

Published on Mon, Mar 24, 2014

The Henrietta Post in New York titled "New state office helps immigrants" used data from the Immigration Policy Center report "New York: Immigrant Entrepreneurs, Innovation, and Welcoming Initiatives in the Empire State".

The article discusses the recent annoucement by Gov. Andrew Cuomo that more than 34,000 immigrants were helped by the New York State Office for New Americans (ONA) during its first year of operations.

"There are 4.2 million immigrants living in the state and one in four New Yorkers of working age are foreign- born, stated the release. Citing data from the Immigration Policy Center: In 2010, 31.2 percent of all business owners in New York State were foreign-born (36 percent in the New York City metropolitan area); these businesses had a total net business income of $12.6 billion, representing 22.6 percent of all net business income in the state; and New York’s immigrants are responsible for $229 billion in annual economic output."

Published in the Henrietta Post

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