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Entrepreneurship and Innovation Update - April 14, 2014

Read our previous Entrepreneurship and Innovation Newsletters here.

Latest Research

Study of U.S. metros with most high-tech immigrant entrepreneurs provides lessons for other regions. A recent post on Immigration Impact highlights a new report from the Kauffman Foundation. The report examines geographic factors that intersect with metro concentration of high-skill immigrant entrepreneurs. According to the report, “an open and culturally diverse environment helps promote high-tech entrepreneurship among both immigrants and the U.S.-born.” As the study notes, “immigrant-owned businesses are more likely to locate in ethnically diverse metro areas that have high foreign-born populations. That’s important for metro areas hoping to attract and retain this fast-growing pool of high-impact founders.” Dane Stangler, vice president of Research and Policy at the Kauffman Foundation, stated, “Because immigrants are far more likely to start businesses—particularly high-tech companies—than the native-born, their importance in the U.S. economy is increasing.”Read more...

E-Verify: Burdens Businesses and Displaces U.S. Workers

Congressional Hearing Ignores Impacts on Business and Asserts it's Good for Workers

Released on Thu, Feb 10, 2011

Washington D.C. - Today, the House Immigration Subcommittee held its second hearing of the new session. Ironically, the hearing was titled "E-Verify - Preserving Jobs for American Workers." Some members of Congress persist in their belief that expanding E-Verify and making it mandatory is a magic-bullet solution to our immigration woes. However, data and analysis demonstrate that expanding E-Verify now would actually have harmful consequences for U.S. workers, employers, and the economy.

Earlier today, the Immigration Policy Center hosted a call with a U.S. citizen who was wrongfully terminated due to an E-Verify error, an attorney who sees first hand the economic impact voluntary E-Verify is having on U.S. businesses and workers, and policy experts.

U.S. citizen Jessica St. Pierre described her experience after being rejected by E-Verify. She spent four months trying to correct the error, which originated with her employer and E-Verify. Jessica dealt with federal agencies, credit bureaus and her former employer, trying to clear her name so she could return to work. Read Jessica's story.Read more...

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Entrepreneurship and Innovation Update - March 31, 2015

Read our previous Entrepreneurship and Innovation Newsletters here.

Latest Research

Challenges and promising practices for immigrant small entrepreneurship, poverty reduction, and economic development. A new report, Harnessing Immigrant Small Entrepreneurship for Economic Growth, describes challenges for small business immigrant entrepreneurs and some of the promising practices to better support them in three cities: Miami, Florida; Des Moines, Iowa; and Salt Lake City, Utah.

How immigrant businesses contribute to community development. A new study—Immigrant Businesses, Place-Making, and Community Development: A Case from an Emerging Immigrant Gateway—explores immigrant business contributions to place-making and community development in Charlotte, North Carolina. The study finds that “immigrant businesses have transformed deteriorating and abandoned street fronts into vibrant and well-frequented urban environments conducive for further development.”Read more...

Mini-Grants Available to Educators and Community Leaders

Released on Thu, Jun 30, 2011

The American Immigration Council's Community Education Center is awarding mini-grants to schools and organizations working with youth to better understand the issue of immigration and the contributions immigrants have made and conitinue to make to our society.  Applications are due July 22, 2011.

For more information visit http://www.communityeducationcenter.org/community-grants.

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South Florida figures remember Sen. Ted Kennedy

Published on Wed, Aug 26, 2009

On Wednesday, South Floridians from the University of Miami president to elected officials weighed in on the passing of U.S. Sen. Ted Kennedy, praising him for his lifetime commitment to public service.

Published in the Miami Herald

Advocates File Suit Against DHS for Refusal to Disclose Records on Enforcement Program

Released on Mon, Mar 12, 2012

Washington D.C. - Last week, an alliance of national immigration advocacy organizations filed suit against the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), seeking to compel the release of documents concerning the agency’s Criminal Alien Program (CAP).

Seeking greater transparency, the American Immigration Council (AIC) and the Connecticut chapter of the American Immigration Lawyers Association (AILA) brought the suit under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA), which requires federal agencies to produce responsive, non-exempt records upon request.   For years, the public has been unable to scrutinize CAP because DHS has shrouded the program in secrecy. AIC and AILA Connecticut requested a variety of documents related to CAP last year, but DHS has not produced a single one.

CAP is the workhorse of the federal immigration enforcement system. Under CAP, Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) agents are stationed in prisons and jails, visit other detention facilities, and initiate deportation proceedings against people convicted of criminal offenses. However, CAP also sweeps up individuals who have been arrested but never convicted of any crime. And while DHS is still rolling out Secure Communities, CAP — a more far-reaching program — has been operational for years. Over the past five years alone, CAP has led to the arrest of more than a million people, and the program was implicated in approximately half of all removal proceedings in FY 2009. Read more...

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Senate makes Sotomayor first Latina on U.S. Supreme Court

Published on Thu, Aug 06, 2009

The Senate confirmed Judge Sonia Sotomayor yesterday as the nation's first Latina Supreme Court justice, concluding a 10-week battle with a resounding victory for the White House.

Published in the Columbus Dispatch

The AIC Welcomes Customs and Border Protection’s New Guidance on Interpretation

Released on Fri, Dec 14, 2012

The American Immigration Council (AIC) welcomes U.S. Customs and Border Protection’s (CBP) decision, announced yesterday, to stop providing interpretation assistance to other law enforcement agencies.  This decision, which is set forth in new agency guidance that has not been publicly released, reportedly directs CBP personnel to refer requests for language translation to a list of private regional and state interpreter associations.  The guidance does not affect CBP’s authority to respond to requests from law enforcement agencies for other types of assistance.Read more...

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Immigrants Vital to U.S. Military, Report Finds

Published on Wed, Nov 11, 2009

With Veterans Day and the tragic events of Fort Hood fresh in the public mind, a new report from the Immigration Policy Center (IPC) entitled Essential to the Fight: Immigrants in the Military, Eight Years After 9/11 should provide some perspective. One of the main points of the report is that "Without the contributions of immigrants, the military could not meet its recruiting goals and could not fill its need for foreign-language translators, interpreters and cultural experts."

Published in the The San Fernando Sun

ICE Agrees to Release Thousands of Previously-Withheld Records

Settlement Will Provide First Detailed Look at “Criminal Alien Program”

Released on Fri, Aug 02, 2013

Washington, DC – Yesterday, a U.S. District Court in Connecticut approved a settlement in a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) lawsuit challenging the refusal of Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) to release tens of thousands of documents about the Criminal Alien Program (CAP), one of the agency’s largest enforcement programs. CAP currently is active in all state and federal prisons, as well as more than 300 local jails throughout the country and is implicated in approximately half of all deportation proceedings. Although CAP supposedly targets the worst criminal offenders, the program also appears to target individuals with little or no criminal history for deportation and to incentivize pretextual stops and racial profiling.

Although CAP facilitates the removal of hundreds of thousands of individuals each year, very little information about the program is available to the public. To better understand CAP, the American Immigration Council (AIC), in collaboration with the Worker and Immigrant Rights Advocacy Clinic of Yale Law School and the Connecticut chapter of the American Immigration Lawyers Association (AILA), filed a FOIA lawsuit to compel ICE to disclose information about CAP. Read more...

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