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Deportation Fears Plague Locals

Published on Thu, Aug 05, 2010

Earlier this year, the Center for American Progress and the American Immigration Council released studies estimating that comprehensive immigration reform, as described above, would increase the U.S. gross domestic product by at least $1.5 trillion over 10 years.

In Colorado, immigrants keep tourism going in small mountain towns with pricey real estate; they often drive hours each day to and from minimum-wage positions in ski towns. Migrants also work the fields and grunt construction jobs.

Published in the Colorado Springs Independent

Immigrant Visa Petitions and Degree Equivalences

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This brief argues that USCIS may not deny a petition for classification under the employment-based third preference (EB-3) immigrant visa category as a skilled worker classification simply because the person does not possess an actual bachelor’s degree. Rather, a person may qualify for EB-3 classification by demonstrating that she possesses the equivalent of a bachelor’s degree based on the combination of education and employment experience.

  • Grace Korean v. Chertoff et al.                        D. Or.                        No. CV04-1849-JE

Educate, Celebrate, and Empower: Build an Inclusive School Community

The one-week immigration community outreach project and lesson plan meets three objectives: 1) to educate students on the experiences of the immigrant population; 2) to celebrate and welcome immigrant students; and 3) to empower all students to implement a social justice project. Read more...

Year Released: 2015

Middle School 6-8 and High School 9-12

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By the numbers: Illegal immigration might be down, but why and what does it mean?

Published on Wed, Sep 15, 2010

Mary Giovagnoli, director of the Washington, D.C.-based Immigration Policy Center, cautions about overstating the decline. "I don't think it's really a significant drop," Giovagnoli says. "Certainly, 8 percent is something, but if you look at where we were in 1990, then at the numbers of illegal immigration in 2009, the number of people here illegally has tripled."

It’s not just enforcement that matters, but policies, too. Giovagnoli thinks some policies that focus on enforcement haven’t deterred people from coming, and maybe made them more likely to stay out of status if they’re already here.

Published in the St. Louis Beacon

Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA)

On November 20, 2014, President Obama announced an expansion of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program and a new Deferred Action for Parental Accountability (DAPA) program. An overview of the updates to Deferred Action under the President’s Immigration Accountability Executive Action can be found here.

The American Immigration Council is currently developing new resources for attorneys ahead of the implementation of these programs.

 

On June 15, 2012, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) issued a memorandum announcing that prosecutorial discretion should be applied to certain individuals who came to the United States as children.  It explains that young noncitizens who do not present a risk to national security or public safety and meet specified criteria may receive deferred action for two years, subject to renewal, and may apply for work authorization. On June 5, 2014, DHS announced the DACA Renewal process.Read more...

2013 Annual "Celebrate America" Creative Writing Contest for 5th Graders-Get Involved

The American Immigration Council's Community Education Center is proud to announce the 16th Annual "Celebrate America"  Creative Writing Contest. 

Past winners have used the theme “Why I am Glad America is a Nation of Immigrants” to discuss their personal immigration experiences, learn about and share family histories or write about the broader questions of the challenges facing immigrants in a new land. Fifth grade students enter their work in local contests which are sponsored by chapters of the American Immigration Lawyers Association (AILA). Each chapter forwards the local winning entry to the National Competition where entries are reviewed by a distinguished panel including U.S. senators, award-winning authors and noted journalists. Winning entries are to be printed in the Congressional Record. The winner and two guests receive an all expenses paid trip to The Council’s Annual Benefit Dinner where he/she is honored and reads his/her winningentry aloud. This year’s Annual Benefit will take place June 28, 2013 in San Francisco, California. The winner also receives a travel stipend, engravedplaque, his/her winning entry printed in the Congressional Record and a flagflown over the Capitol in his/her honor. Local and national judges are looking for student writing that is original, thoughtful and speaks to the Council’s mission to educate the public about the benefits of immigration to our society.

The deadline for local submissions varies so check with a local coordinator (local deadlines are usually in February or March).  The national deadline where local contest winner's submissions are judged will be April 12, 2013.Read more...

With Republican dominance, how long till push for Arizona immigration law here?

Published on Thu, Nov 04, 2010

According to the Immigration Policy Center, S.B. 1070 “requires state and local law enforcement agencies to check the immigration status of individuals it encounters and makes it a state crime for noncitizens to fail to carry proper immigration documentation.”

Published in the Florida Independent

Litigation Clearinghouse Newsletter Vol. 3, No. 5

This issue covers a new suit seeking detention standards, update on religious workers class action, class action certification in a naturalization delay suit, limitations on the categorical approach, and litigation resources on the web.

Published On: Tuesday, May 6, 2008 | Download File

Immigration talks intrigue UAFA supporters

Published on Wed, Feb 09, 2011

Mary Giovagnoli, director of the Immigration Policy Center, a think tank arm for the American Immigration Council, said predicting whether the 112th Congress would see UAFA as part of comprehensive immigration reform at this stage in talks is difficult.

“It’s hard to know whether it would make it into the final formalized piece of legislation because there’s just so many intangibles, especially when you don’t know who all the sponsors might be, where they’ll draw their lines in the sand,” she said.

 

Published in the Washington Blade