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Read more about the demographic and economic impacts immigrants are making in your state.

The Immigration Fight Heads to Pennsylvania

Published on Wed, Oct 12, 2011

It appears as if Pennsylvania is the next state to enter into the fray of reforming their state’s immigration laws. Last week, the State Government Committee approved the Professional Licensees Illegal Employment Act. If the bill becomes law, it would penalize anyone that hires undocumented workers by revoking their professional licenses from the Bureau of Occupational and Professional Affairs. This Bureau controls the professional licensing of over 30 licensing boards for various occupations including doctors, nurses, and funeral directors.

The Pennsylvania bill has wide support from Pennsylvania Republicans who believe that employers who hire illegal immigrants are not penalized at all. They believe that illegal immigrants are taking vital jobs in a time where the country is facing increasingly high unemployment rates. Opposition to the bill is widespread, with critics citing the bill’s continued failure to set out a clear policy of how it is going to be enforced.

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Although Alabama has yet to fully enforce its draconian immigration laws, Alabama is already beginning to suffer because of its new legislation. After Judge Sharon Blackburn upheld HB 56, nearly 25% of the state’s construction workers have failed to show up to work. In a time where Alabama is supposed to be focusing on rebuilding infrastructure following the Tuscaloosa tornadoes of last year, the lack of construction workers in Alabama is troublesome. The Perryman Group stated that Alabama could lose an estimated 18,000 jobs and $2.6 billion in revenue because of the state’s immigration measures. Estimates from the American Immigration Council could also cost the states another $130 million in lost tax revenues.Read more...

Published in the Immigration Daily

Supreme Court Update

The Supreme Court Update provides information about recent Supreme Court decisions in immigration cases and other cases which may be of interest to immigration attorneys, as well as information about immigration cases in which the Supreme Court has granted a petition for certiorari. The site features case summaries, dates for oral argument and, in some cases, additional resources such as amicus briefs and related practice advisories.

 Last updated: July 24, 2015

Certiorari Granted | Cases Decided | Supreme Court Resources

Please contact the Clearinghouse at clearinghouse@immcouncil.org if you know of any additional resources or changes in the status of cases that are not indicated here.

Immigration policy to see a big change

Published on Sat, Jan 07, 2012

What We Do

Litigation and Advocacy

The LAC uses litigation and advocacy as tools to protect the rights of noncitizens. We litigate in the federal courts, focusing our work on cases that have a wide impact.  We also advocate before the immigration agencies to help ensure that the immigration laws are implemented properly.  The following are our litigation and advocacy priorities: Read more...

In D.C., a Push to Aid Irish Migrants

Published on Wed, Mar 21, 2012

WASHINGTON - Congress may have finally found an immigration issue it can agree on in an election year: letting in more Irish people.

At a time when the volatile issue of comprehensive immigration reform is hopelessly stalled in a divided Congress, senators of both parties are rallying behind legislation that would allow 10,500 Irish nationals to come to the U.S. to work each year.

The legislation by Sen. Scott Brown, R-Mass., has been attacked by critics as a cynical ploy to win Irish-American votes as Brown battles for re-election in a state where one in four residents is of Irish descent. It also has been decried by both pro-immigration and anti-immigration groups as an example of favoritism toward European immigrants over Hispanics and Asians.

But supporters of the bill, including Democratic Sen. Charles Schumer of New York, say they are trying to help reverse discrimination against Irish nationals that was inadvertently created by a 1965 overhaul of the U.S. immigration system.

That overhaul, designed to end a bias against immigrants from Latin America, Asia and Africa, made it difficult for Irish immigrants to obtain visas despite their strong cultural ties to the U.S., say supporters of Brown's bill. Hispanics and Asians have been the dominant immigrant groups to the U.S. since 1965 and, as they become citizens, their close family members have been given priority for U.S. visas as part of the U.S. government's emphasis on family reunification.

About 40 million Americans identify themselves as being of Irish descent, or about 13 percent of the U.S. population of more than 313 million. Hispanics make up about 16 percent of U.S. residents. The number of Irish immigrants granted permanent legal status in the U.S. has plunged from nearly 38,000 in the 1960s to about 16,000 in the 10 years from 2000 through 2009.Read more...

Published in the The Arizona Republic

International Exchange Center Programs

INTERNATIONAL EXCHANGE CENTER PROGRAMS

The J-1 Visa: Changing America, Changing the World

The Role of the J-1 Trainee/Intern

Interns and Trainees

The Department of State's J-1 Visa Basics


 

THE ROLE OF THE J-1 TRAINEE OR INTERN

Sometimes, it is easy to become confused about the role of the trainee or intern within the host organization.

The trainee/intern’s role is to:

• Learn about the U.S. host organization
• Learn the specific skills and knowledge laid out in the DS-7002 training plan under constant watch of a supervisor
• Gain a new understanding of U.S. culture
• Share their home culture with colleagues and friends

J-1 visa regulations are very specific. A J-1 intern or trainee program should never include more than 20% clerical work or be used in place of regular employment. J-1 trainees and interns are not at will employees.Read more...

The new meaning of minority in Oregon

Published on Sat, May 26, 2012

Numbers from the IPC State Fact Sheets were used in an editorial written by the Oregonian Editors about the importance of immigrants in their state: Read more...

Published in the The Oregonian

Kendell K. Frederick

Army Specialist Kendell K. Frederick was born on August 17, 1984 on the island of Trinidad. There he lived with his grandfather and great grandparents, while his mother Michelle Frederick Murphy migrated to the United States to make a better life for her and her son.

In January 1999, at the age of fifteen, Kendell immigrated to the U.S. to join his mother and family in Randallstown, Maryland. There he was welcomed by his mother, his stepfather Kenmore Murphy, and his two sisters, Kennisha and Kendra. The entire family had looked forward to that day for a very long time.

Kendell attended Old Court Middle School, and upon graduating, attended Randallstown senior High School. There he was introduced to the R.O.T.C. program and decided to give it a try. He loved being in a leadership role, and stayed committed to the R.O.T.C. program for the entire four years.

In 2001, while in his last year of high school, Kendell decided to enlist in the army reserve, and that summer entered basic training at Fort Sill Oklahoma, where he graduated on July 17, 2002.

Upon returning home, Kendell entered Aberdeen and obtained his degree in generator engineering. In February of 2004, he was assigned to the Army reserve's 983rd Engineer Battalion, based in Monclova, Ohio. From there he was deployed to Iraq in December 2004 to work on power generators. His unit, which specializes in construction of roads and infrastructure, depended on him to operate and maintain the portable electrical sources needed to perform their work.Read more...

After run-in with law, Cambodian immigrant’s permanent residency is at risk

Published on Thu, Oct 04, 2012

The IPC's Ben Winograd was quoted in a Washington Post article about the deportation of Legal Permanent Residents:

Read more...

Published in the The Washington Post