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Justice Dept. Challenges Arizona Over Other Immigration Law Targeting Employers

Published on Thu, Jun 03, 2010

"The argument that the Justice Department is making here, is you know, the fundamental question, which is where does state authority begin and end when it comes to federal immigration law?" said Benjamin Johnson, executive director of the American Immigration Council.

Published in the Fox News

Immigrant Entrepreneurs, Innovation, and Welcoming Initiatives by State

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Browse our state fact sheets on the impact of immigrant entrepreneurs and state Welcoming Initiatives.

Immigration Requires National Answers

Published on Thu, Jul 08, 2010

The Immigration Policy Center reported, "If all unauthorized immigrants were removed from Oregon, the state would lose $3.4 billion in economic activity, $1.5 billion in gross state product, and approximately 19,259 jobs."

Published in the Statesman Journal

Rescinding an In Absentia Order of Removal

There are two main situations where individuals who were ordered removed or deported in absentia can reopen their cases: (1) they did not receive notice of the hearing, and (2) they did not appear at their hearing because of exceptional circumstances. This Practice Advisory addresses the elements and requirements for an in absentia motion to reopen in both contexts.

Published On: Wednesday, March 31, 2010 | Download File

Stories of Immigration

Stories of Immigration teaches secondary grade students about the value of immigration through selected literature. The lesson also increases student awareness of the important historical periods of immigration and the effects of these events on America.

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Deportation Fears Plague Locals

Published on Thu, Aug 05, 2010

Earlier this year, the Center for American Progress and the American Immigration Council released studies estimating that comprehensive immigration reform, as described above, would increase the U.S. gross domestic product by at least $1.5 trillion over 10 years.

In Colorado, immigrants keep tourism going in small mountain towns with pricey real estate; they often drive hours each day to and from minimum-wage positions in ski towns. Migrants also work the fields and grunt construction jobs.

Published in the Colorado Springs Independent

Notices to Appear

This practice advisory, written in collaboration with the ABA Commission on Immigration and Penn State Law’s Center for Immigrants’ Rights, provides innovative legal and procedural arguments and strategies for attorneys representing noncitizens 1) who are likely to be issued NTAs, 2) who have been issued NTAs that have not been filed with the immigration court, or 3) who have been issued NTAs that have been filed. It provides an overview of the legal requirements for an NTA and strategies available to attorneys to cancel, mitigate, or challenge the contents of an NTA. In addition to presenting legal and procedural arguments, the advisory provides strategies to attorneys wishing to seek prosecutorial discretion in connection with the NTA.

Published On: Monday, June 30, 2014 | Download File

The Urban Institute

The nonpartisan Urban Institute publishes studies, reports, and books on timely topics worthy of public consideration. The views expressed are those of the authors and should not be attributed to the Urban Institute, its trustees, or its funders.

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By the numbers: Illegal immigration might be down, but why and what does it mean?

Published on Wed, Sep 15, 2010

Mary Giovagnoli, director of the Washington, D.C.-based Immigration Policy Center, cautions about overstating the decline. "I don't think it's really a significant drop," Giovagnoli says. "Certainly, 8 percent is something, but if you look at where we were in 1990, then at the numbers of illegal immigration in 2009, the number of people here illegally has tripled."

It’s not just enforcement that matters, but policies, too. Giovagnoli thinks some policies that focus on enforcement haven’t deterred people from coming, and maybe made them more likely to stay out of status if they’re already here.

Published in the St. Louis Beacon

Prosecutorial Discretion

Under the President’s Immigration Accountability Executive Action, prosecutorial discretion will be exercised differently. In addition to the announcement of a new DACA-like deferred action program for the parents of U.S. citizens and lawful permanent residents, the Immigration Accountability Executive Action expands the existing DACA program and sets forth new enforcement priorities that will bind ICE, USCIS and CBP. For more information on these changes, please see the American Immigration Council’s guide to the President’s Immigration Accountability Executive Action here.

The American Immigration Council is currently developing new resources on prosecutorial discretion

 

Prosecutorial discretion is the authority of a law enforcement agency or officer to decide whether to enforce the law in a particular case. In the immigration context, favorable exercises of prosecutorial discretion include grants of deferred action, stays of removal, and decisions to cancel or not issue a Notice to Appear (NTA). Since 2000, the legacy Immigration and Naturalization Service and current DHS agencies have issued more than a dozen guidance memoranda addressing prosecutorial discretion. The LAC has issued a practice advisory suggesting ways that immigration attorneys can influence the favorable exercise of prosecutorial discretion by DHS, and filed an amicus brief relating to the exercise of prosecutorial discretion in a Ninth Circuit case.

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