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Tough Arizona-Style Immigration Laws Pose New Issues for High Court

Published on Tue, Dec 06, 2011

The U.S. Supreme Court will meet later this week to decide whether the justices will hear Arizona's case with the Department of Justice over its stringent anti-immigration law.

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Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer, a Republican, petitioned the high court in August to take its case in an effort to get an early injunction blocking the law's more onerous provisions overturned.

Expectations that the justices take Grand Canyon State's case are low. There are pending cases from the Justice Department challenging Arizona-style anti-immigration laws in other states and there has yet to be a split among the appellate courts that the high court needs to address.

But the fact that Arizona has already reached a petition stage is a sign that an immigration battle could end up on the Supreme Court docket in the near future. A case over these new laws, which grant local police power to detain and check the immigration status of anyone suspected of being in the country without authorization, would be new terrain for the Supreme Court.

Several years ago, states never attempted to pass such tough immigration laws, says Ben Winograd of the American Immigration Council Legal Action Center.

Can-You-Top-This-Conservatism Laws

Now, states seem like they are trying to compete with one another to devise the toughest law to drive out largely Hispanic immigrant population. This can be attributed in part to Kris W. Kobach, an Ivy League-educated constitutional lawyer who is currently serving as Kansas' Republican secretary of state and is of counsel to the Immigration Reform Law Institute.

He is the brain behind Arizona's anti-immigration law, SB1070, and also a hand in Alabama's HB56, considered one of the harshest anti-immigration laws in the nation.

Such laws are now in six states, including Utah, South Carolina, Indiana and Georgia.Read more...

Published in the International Business Times

News & Media

War against drug cartels needs new focus, strategy

Published on Mon, Feb 06, 2012

 

A bit of respect, please, for the drug cartels. For their ingenuity, technological shrewdness and ability to adapt their products and services to a changing marketplace.

It’s a perspective missed by both Democrats and Republicans. Politicians of both parties are too busy grandstanding about “securing” or “fixing” a border they fail fully to understand.

A series of position papers is being released by the nonprofit Immigration Policy Center detailing the failings at the U.S.-Mexico border in stark, necessary language. The author is former Arizona attorney general Terry Goddard, and his nuanced view is a corrective to the overheated rhetoric we usually hear on the subject.

Most Americans think the trouble at our southern border is just about guns, dope and meth. Goddard argues the Mexican drug cartels are more aptly described as “transnational criminal organizations.” They are branching to new lines of business like production and distribution of pirated music, movies and software, money laundering and hijacking.

“Rather than being just a line in the desert sand, the southwest border is a complex, multidimensional interrelationship of immigration laws, cyberspace money transfers and international business connections,” Goddard writes.

His second in a series of three reports, “How to Fix a Broken Border: Disrupting Smuggling at Its Source,” was released days ago. In almost every paragraph you can read Goddard’s exasperation with our wrongheaded border policy.

Politicians earn brownie points from voters by pumping up the rhetoric about needing “more boots on the ground,” but they are unlikely to catch a Zeta that way. “If we are serious about stopping the threat on the border, we have to dismantle the criminal organizations that carry the contraband and take away the tools that make them so effective,” Goddard writes. “Anything less will fail.”Read more...

Published in the Kansas City Star

FAQs




Prospective Applicant FAQs:
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1. What occupational categories can the American Immigration Council sponsor?
The American Immigration Council is designated by the U.S. Department of State to sponsor J-1 intern and trainee programs in the following occupational areas:

• Arts and Culture
• Information Media and Communications
• Management, Business, Commerce and Finance
• Public Administration and Law
• Social Sciences, Library Science, Non-clinical Counseling, Social Services
• The Sciences, Engineering, Architecture, Mathematics and Industrial Occupations
• Tourism

2. How long can the internship or training program be?
Intern programs have a maximum duration of 12 months. Trainee programs have a maximum duration of 18 months.

3. What are the minimum qualifications for an international intern?
Potential J-1 interns must be able to document and/or demonstrate the following to meet basic eligibility requirements:

• Sufficient English language fluency (to be determined by American Immigration Council staff)
• Current enrollment at a post-secondary, degree-granting academic program outside of the United States or
• Graduation within the past 12 months from such post-secondary academic program outside of the United StatesRead more...

Other states eye SB 1070 proceedings

Published on Wed, Apr 25, 2012

Two years after Arizona passed a controversial immigration-enforcement law that, among other things, makes it a state crime to be in the country illegally, the U.S. Supreme Court will hear arguments Wednesday for and against the law. Several other states, including Texas, that have passed — or have attempted to pass — similar legislation are certain to keep a close eye on the proceedings.

Analysts say that a decision will probably be rendered in June, which would leave ample time for lawmakers in Texas to mull over if or how they would attempt to write legislation aimed at curbing illegal immigration before the next legislative session convenes in January. Several dozen bills — including measures making it a state crime to knowingly hire an illegal immigrant (except those hired for domestic services) and broadening the immigration-enforcement authority of local law enforcement — were filed during the 2011 session. But none passed.

Read more...

Published in the Tucson Sentinel

Green Card Stories

The immigration debate is boiling over. Americans are losing the ability to understand and talk to one another about immigration. The new Arizona immigration law makes it clear that we must find a way to connect on a human level.

Green Card Stories does just that. The book depicts 50 recent immigrants with permanent residence or citizenship in dramatic narratives of about 1,000 words each, accompanied by artistic photos. Rather than couching immigration in terms of economics or politics, these stories appeal to the heart.

Each story is as old as the foundation of this immigrant nation, but also reflects the global trends and conflicts of the 21st century: the aspiring dentist who fled war-torn Sudan with just three T-shirts and a pair of shoes; the Caribbean-born orthopedic surgeon facing deportation; the Iraqi bodyguard for U.S. troops blinded by a car bomb; a former Mexican farm worker and school dropout turned high school principal. Arriving from all corners of the globe, coming for work, love, to study or escape persecution, they all share a steely resourcefulness and a fierce love for America. Green Card Stories tells the true story of our nation: E pluribus unum--out of many, one.Read more...

Meet the immigrant Olympians

Published on Mon, Jul 30, 2012

IPC's Immigration Impact blog was referred to by Southern California Public Radio's Leslie Berestein Rojas in her own blog about immigration and cultural fusion in Southern California.  The article gives tribute to the diverse US athletes participating in this year's exciting Olympic Games: Read more...

Published in the Southern California Public Radio: Multi-American

D. Jean Wu

Ms. D. Jean Wu grew up in Taiwan and came to the United States at the age of fourteen. She earned her undergraduate degree in marketing at the University of Virginia and her master's degree in information science at George Mason University. She also attended business executive programs at the Amos Tuck School of Business Administration at Dartmouth College.

Ms. Wu is the founder of Integrated Management Services, Inc. (IMSI). The company was established to provide solutions with an emphasis on information security and infrastructure security.

Ms. Wu serves on the Board of Visitors of the George Mason University, the Board of Trustees of the George Mason Foundation and the Board of Directors of the Virginia Hospital Center.

Ms. Wu is a long-standing supporter of charitable and educational organizations in the Washington D.C. Metropolitan area, including the Close Up Foundation, Heads Up, Boys and Girls Clubs of Greater Washington, and the Best Friends Foundation.

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Two Systems of Justice Paper Highlighted in Voxxi and the Huffington Post

Published on Thu, Mar 21, 2013

The IPC and LAC's Special Report, "Two Systems of Justice:  How the Immigration System Falls Short of American Ideals of Justice," was highlighted in a piece by Voxxi, which was then reposted by the Huffington Post:

"The United States’ justice system is supposed to operate equally for all defendants, but a new report reveals that the immigration system operates under a different set of rules for immigrants facing deportation.

The American Immigration Council issued on Tuesday a report that reveals the immigration system fails to provide “a fair process” to immigrants in removal proceedings and “lacks nearly all of the procedural safeguards we rely on and value in the U.S. justice system.” The report, titled “Two Systems of Justice: How the Immigration System Falls Short of the Ideals of Justice”, also explores the major operational differences between the criminal justice system and the immigration removal system."

You can read the full report here.

Published in the Voxxi

Maria Blanco

Maria Blanco serves as the Executive Director for the Chief Justice Earl Warren Institute at Berkeley Law, University of California. She served as executive director of the Lawyers' Committee for Civil Rights of the San Francisco Bay Area. She brings more than 20 years of experience as a litigator and advocate for immigrant rights, women's rights and racial justice. Blanco is also the co‐chair of the California Coalition for Civil Rights, a group dedicated to building a progressive national agenda for civil and human rights.