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IPC Staff

Beth Werlin, Director

Beth Werlin directs the Council’s policy and research program.  Prior to assuming the position of Director of Policy, Beth worked for over 13 years in the Council’s legal department and was involved in nearly every major legal issue the Council tackled over the last decade.  She has worked to protect the rights of noncitizens and ensure that the immigration agencies are held accountable for violations of the law.  She has represented plaintiffs and amicus curiae in immigration litigation in the federal courts and before the Board of Immigration Appeals and is the author of numerous practice advisories.  Beth first joined the legal team in 2001 as a NAPIL fellow and before that was a judicial law clerk at the immigration court in Boston, Massachusetts.  She earned her J.D. from Boston College Law School and her B.A. from Tufts University. 

Wendy Feliz, Communications Director
202-507-7524
wfeliz@immcouncil.org
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Quick Fact: Unauthorized immigrants pay taxes

At last count, households headed by unauthorized immigrants paid $11.2 billion in state and local taxes.

 

Anchor Baby: A Term Redefined as a Slur

Published on Thu, Dec 08, 2011

What does the term “anchor baby” mean? If you were to look it up in the American Heritage Dictionary, you would find a new definition since last week.

The term was among some 10,000 new words and phrases in the fifth edition of the dictionary, published in November. It was defined as: “A child born to a noncitizen mother in a country that grants automatic citizenship to children born on its soil, especially such a child born to parents seeking to secure eventual citizenship for themselves and often other members of their family.”

But when Steve Kleinedler, the executive editor of the dictionary, read that definition during a radio interview last month, it troubled Mary Giovagnoli, the director of the Immigration Policy Center, a pro-immigration research group in Washington.

The once-obscure term has been used frequently in the recent debate over whether to change the Constitution to deny automatic American citizenship to children born in this country to illegal immigrant parents.

Last Friday morning, Ms. Giovagnoli posted an angry item on the center’s blog, saying the dictionary “masks the poisonous and derogatory nature of the term, a term which demeans both parent and child.” Her item soared into the blogosphere. By Friday afternoon, Mr. Kleinedler had called Ms. Giovagnoli.Read more...

Published in the New York Times

Board

BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Paul L. Zulkie, President
Robert E. Juceam, Secretary
Warren R. Leiden, Treasurer     
Benjamin E. Johnson, Executive Director

Doug Stump, AILA Immediate Past President
William A. Stock, AILA 1st Vice President
Annaluisa Padilla, AILA 2nd Vice President
Lori Chesser, Chair, Board of Trustees
Crystal Williams, AILA Executive Director

BOARD OF TRUSTEES

Lori Chesser, Chair (2014) 
F. Dan Siciliano, Vice-Chair (2014)Read more...

Report urges alternative to mass deportation of illegal immigrants

Published on Sun, Feb 12, 2012

BISBEE — A special report issued earlier this month by the Immigration Policy Center called “Discrediting ‘Self Deportation’ as Immigration Policy” argues that forcing all illegal immigrants to leave the United States would make life difficult for everyone.

The strategy called “attrition through enforcement” was conceived by national immigration restrictionist organizations, including the Federation for American Immigration Reform, Center for Immigration Studies and Numbers USA.

“While these groups favor severe restrictions on all immigration and support mass deportation, they are also proponents of this strategy. Recognizing the current political reality, they have sought to market the idea of attrition through enforcement as a kinder, gentler alternative to the harsh, expensive, and unworkable strategy of mass deportation,” states the Immigration Policy Center report.

“According to CIS (Center for Immigration Studies), attrition through enforcement involves reducing the number of unauthorized immigrants living in the U.S., and deterring future unauthorized immigrants from coming, by stepping up enforcement of existing laws and increasing the incentives for immigrants to ‘deport themselves.’ As Numbers USA puts it: ‘There is no need for taxpayers to watch the government spend billions of their dollars to round up and deport illegal aliens; they will buy their own bus or plane tickets back home if they can no longer earn a living here,’” it continues.

According to its Web site, the Immigration Policy Center is the research and policy arm of the American Immigration Council. IPC’s mission is to shape a rational conversation on immigration and immigrant integration. In its report, the group points out that attrition through enforcement has not resulted in a significant reduction in the unauthorized immigrant population, and it has had a devastating impact on communities.Read more...

Published in the The Sierra Vista Herald

Attorney FAQs

ATTORNEY FAQs:

1. What types of J-1 exchanges can the American Immigration Council sponsor?

2. What occupational categories can the American Immigration Council sponsor?

3. What are the minimum qualifications for program participants?

4. What are the fees for sponsorship?

5. What is the refund policy?

6. Does the International Exchange Center accept electronic signatures on application materials?

7. What is the Dun & Bradstreet DUNS number and is it an absolute requirement for potential host companies?

8. Can potential exchange visitors change status to a J-1 trainee or intern visa?

 

ATTORNEY FAQs:

 1. What types of J-1 exchanges can the American Immigration Council sponsor?

The International Exchange Center of the American Immigration Council is designated by the Department of State to sponsor intern and trainee J-1 programs.

2. What occupational categories can the American Immigration Council sponsor?

The American Immigration Council is designated by the U.S. Department of State to sponsor J-1 programs in the following occupational areas:

• Arts and Culture

• Social Sciences, Library Science, and Social Services

• Tourism

• Information Media and Communications

• Management, Business, Commerce and Finance

• Public Administration and Law

• The Sciences, Engineering, Architecture, Mathematics and Industrial Occupations

3. What are the minimum qualifications for program participants?Read more...

Chasing the Dream: Sorting Fact and Myth Is Biggest Obstacle to Immigration Reform

Published on Tue, May 01, 2012

Consensus doesn’t seem to have a place in policy discussions about the state of the U.S. immigration system. But there is, at least, widespread agreement that the system needs fixing.

“Everyone will tell you the laws aren’t working,” says Brittney Nystrom, director of policy and legal affairs at the National Immigration Forum in Washington, D.C. But beyond that starting premise, views on immigration laws start to splinter.

“On both sides of this debate, there are deeply held beliefs about what immigration means to America,” says Nystrom. “On one side, you have the idea that we’re a nation of immigrants, and it’s healthy and important to keep that tradition alive. On the other side, you have the argument that immigrants are a burden. Trying to factually discuss immigration becomes almost impossible when people tend to fall into one camp or the other based on what they’re told.” Read more...

Published in the ABA Journal

Order your Copy of Green Card Stories Today!

The American Immigration Council is proud to support the publication of Green Card Stories. Green Card Stories is an incredible tribute to the diverse backgrounds that make up our immigrant population in America today. We can’t think of a better way to serve our mission to strengthen America by honoring our immigrant history than by highlighting this incredibly beautiful and touching book.

You can order books for yourself, your office, family members, clients, etc. as well as donate a book to your local school, library or community center or to one of the Council’s designated “hot spots” where education on immigration is needed most. Could your Member of Congress use a thank you or a gentle reminder of who our immigrant population is? Donate a copy of Green Card Stories to a Congressional office. All donated books will be delivered free of charge with a note indicating your generous gift.

To order your copy, fill out an order form.

Click on the book above to get a slideshow preview!

The American Immigration Council would like to thank the Alliance of Business Immigration Lawyers for providing the initial efforts and funding of Green Card Stories.

Deferred deportation program ready to begin accepting applications

Published on Fri, Aug 10, 2012

Cronkite News listed IPC statistics in an article about the deferred deportation program preparing to accept applications on August 15, 2012.  The numbers come from IPC's "Who and Where the DREAMers Are," and breaks down the numbers of eligible immigrants living in Arizona by congressional district: Read more...

Published in the Cronkite News

Michel Richard

His style is light, fresh and intelligent, with witty presentations and texture. Michel was a pioneer in French/California cuisine, before moving to Washington, DC, where Michel Richard Citronelle became his flagship restaurant.

Richard knew he wanted to be a chef when he first glimpsed a restaurant kitchen at the age of eight. "The white hats, aprons, and all of the food - I fell in love." His fate was decided.

Michel's creativity can be seen in prestigious culinary publications such as Food & Wine, Food Arts, Gourmet, Bon Appetit, and has been featured in the Washingtonian, The New York Times, Washington Post, and Los Angeles Times, among others. Michel has recently released his second book, Happy in the Kitchen, and opened Central Michel Richard, a new American-French casual dining restaurant in downtown, Washington, DC.

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