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Tribute Donations

Remember those people who are or who have influenced your life by paying tribute to them.  A tribute donation to the American Immigration Council provides a meaningful way to remember or recognize those who have made a significant impact on you, your family or your colleagues.

A tribute donation can be made in honor or in memory of someone.  For each tribute, we will notify the honored individual or family of your special gift, keeping the amount confidential. 

You can make a tribute donation online (be sure to fill out “In Honor or In Memory” portion of the form and complete the dedication information) or by completing this form and mailing it to:

 

 American Immigration Council
c/o Megan Hess
1333 G Street, NW
Suite 200
Washington, DC  20005

 

Or you may fax the form to the attention of Megan Hess at (202) 742-5619.

If you have any questions at all regarding giving a contribution to the American Immigration Council, please contact Megan Hess at (202)507-7517 or mhess@immcouncil.org.

Romney Campaign May Be Moving Left on Immigration

Published on Wed, Apr 18, 2012

Mitt Romney’s campaign hired GOP campaign strategist Ed Gillespie, while Kris Kobach’s “advisor” status was put in doubt, according to news reports.

Elise Floey of Huffington Post wrote Tuesday that the Romney campaign “told Politico that [Kris] Kobach is a ‘supporter,’ not an adviser. This contradicts both Kobach’s previous statements and his seemingly larger role in the campaign — a bigger part than the campaign is letting on.”

Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach authored Arizona’s controversial immigration enforcement-only law. He endorsed Romney in January, “advised Romney on immigration during his 2008 presidential bid and has long-promoted the strategy of ‘attrition through enforcement’— the immigration-control strategy to drive away the unauthorized population by making their lives so miserable that they will choose to ‘deport themselves’ rather than remain in the U.S.,” according to the Immigration Policy Center.

The Hill reported Tuesday that “Romney’s hiring of Republican strategist Ed Gillespie is being seen as a sign the campaign will heavily court Hispanic voters — perhaps at the expense of immigration hard-liners in the party.”

“When asked for an interview, Gillespie directed The Hill to Romney’s presidential campaign, which said he’d be a senior adviser that will help them with messaging, overall strategy and the August convention in Tampa, Fla,” The Hill added.

“Gillespie, a former head of the Republican National Committee, has long advocated an aggressive outreach to the Hispanic community,” The Hill wrote. “He also heads up Resurgent Republic, an organization focused on messaging to independents, including Hispanic swing voters.”

Resurgent Republic is currently developing a six part “target voter series” focused on suburban women, young voters, seniors, independents, Hispanics and blue collar Catholics.Read more...

Published in the Colorado Independent

J-1 Trainees and Interns

RESOURCES FOR J-1 TRAINEES AND INTERNS

The American Immigration Council is designated by the U.S. Department of State to sponsor J-1 intern and trainee programs. Intern programs have a maximum duration of 12 months. Trainee programs have a maximum duration of 18 months. Potential J-1 interns must be enrolled in a post-secondary, degree-granting academic program located outside of the United States or graduated within the past 12 months from such post-secondary academic program outside of the United States. Potential J-1 trainees must hold a post-secondary degree related to the field of the training and one (1) year of related work experience, both of which were gained outside of the United States, or have five (5) years of related work experience gained outside of the United States.Read more...

Romney Debuts a Lighter Touch on Immigration

Published on Fri, Jun 22, 2012

IPC Senior Policy Analyst Michele Waslin was quoted in a TIME article covering Romney's stance on immigration:

According to a State Department report from November 2011, in fiscal year 2012 there are 322,636 people in countries around the world awaiting approval to join legal permanent-resident family members in the U.S. Many others who are eligible already live here, according to Michele Waslin of the Immigration Policy Center, some of whom are undocumented and legally awaiting a change in status.

Published in the TIME

Emmanuel Irono

Emmanuel O. Irono came to the United States as a foreign exchange student and planned to return to Nigeria after college to work for his father's construction company. But when both of his parents died within two years, he decided against returning and began paying his tuition by working as a school janitor.

After graduating, Mr. Irono took a job working as a budget analyst for a federal contractor. However, he wanted to start his own firm, and he bought out a small struggling janitorial service company's supplies for $10,000 and turned it into $14 million profit generator. He renamed the company Motir, in honor of his parents - Memory of Theresa Irono Romonus (MOTIR).

With an exceptional track record in senior level management and administration, Mr. Irono has grown Motir Inc. from one division of custodial services to a full scale management consulting company with divisions for Construction and Environmental Services, Facilities Management and Medical Staffing.

Never forgetting his roots, the Nigerian born Irono has traveled all over the world and has created a company of diversity that continues to give back to his homeland through his non profit organization TIS (To Inspire Strong) African Children Fund. TIS feeds, educates and provides medical treatment for the children of Africa. Whether feeding the hungry and abandoned, supplying educational tools for rural area school children, or implementing an AIDS Awareness Program, Mr. Irono is taking local action and reaching global heights.

As Chief Executive Officer, Mr. Irono has served on the Board of Directors of major organizations, while continuing to direct all aspects of Motir's operational policies, objectives, and initiatives responsible for the attainment of both short and long term goals.Read more...

IPC's Walter Ewing Writes for Yahoo! Finance

Published on Thu, Jan 24, 2013

The IPC's Senior Researcher, Walter Ewing, had this article published in Yahoo! Finance:

"The U.S. immigration system undermines the U.S. economy in many ways. Two particularly glaring (and interrelated) examples concern foreign students and high-tech workers.

Each year, foreign students graduate from U.S. universities, often with in-demand science and engineering degrees. Yet many are forced to return to their home countries rather than putting their newly acquired knowledge to work here. Likewise, each year many high-tech workers from abroad (some of whom studied in U.S. universities) are forced to return home when their temporary work visas expire, regardless of how valuable their continuing contributions to the U.S. economy might be.

Both of these scenarios are nonsensical. That is why President Obama said in his inaugural address that the nation’s work will not be complete 'until bright young students and engineers are enlisted in our workforce rather than expelled from our country.'"

Published in the Yahoo! Finance

Roberto G. Gonzales Ph.D.

Roberto G. Gonzales Ph.D. is an Assistant Professor at the University Of Washington School Of Social Work. He earned his Ph.D. in the department of sociology at the University of California. His research focuses on the ways in which legal and educational institutions shape the everyday experiences and the transitions to adulthood of poor, minority, and immigrant youth. Current projects include a four and a half year study of undocumented immigrant young adults in Los Angeles, a companion study in Seattle, and comparative projects on immigrant youth in the U.S. and Europe. Gonzales is the author of When Do Papers Matter? An Institutional Analysis of Undocumented Life in the United States (forthcoming), Young Lives on Hold: The College Dreams of Undocumented Students and Why Integration Matters: Undocumented Immigrant Youth and Making a Case for Moving Beyond Enforcement and his work appears in numerous publications.Read more...

Hanford Sentinel Myth-Busting Article Cites Several IPC Resources

Published on Tue, Aug 06, 2013

An article in the California newspaper The Hanford Sentinel cited a number of resources from the Immigration Policy Center in an attempt to bust a number of immigration myths.  The article cites the recently posted California state fact sheet, a separate California fact sheet highlighting immigrants and innovation, and the recent report by Jack Strauss on Latino immigrants, African-Americans, and the myth that they are in competition for jobs.

"“Immigrant workers spend their wages in U.S. businesses,” said an Immigration Policy Center summary. “They buy food, clothes, appliances, cars and much more. Businesses respond to the presence of these new workers and consumers by investing in new restaurants, stores and production facilities. Immigrants also are 30 percent more likely than the native-born to start their own businesses. The end result is more jobs and more pay for more workers.”

What about immigrants’ effect on African-Americans? “Cities experiencing the highest rates of immigration tend to have relatively low or average unemployment rates for African-Americans,” Saint Louis University economist Jack Strauss concluded in an analysis of Census findings. “Cities with greater immigration from Latin America experience lower unemployment rates, poverty rates and higher wages among African-Americans.”

This may be counter-intuitive, but it’s probably because Latino newcomers and African-Americans don’t compete for the same jobs.

“Native-born workers take higher-paying jobs that require better English-language skills,” said the Immigration Policy Center report."

Published in the Hanford Sentinel

Robert L. Smith

Robert L. Smith is a veteran journalist who covers international cultures and immigration issues for the Cleveland Plain Dealer, Ohio’s largest newspaper. Bob grew up in Cleveland, where he lives with his wife, Cleveland Orchestra violinist Chul‐In Park, and their two children, Jae, 5, and Sun‐Hee, 3. He has written extensively about immigration issues and has interviewed people at all points of the immigrant experience, from undocumented field workers to hugely successful entrepreneurs.

IPC Featured in Latin Post

Published on Sat, Apr 05, 2014

The IPC's March 2014 report "Misplaced Priorities: Most Immigrants Deported by ICE in 2013 Were a Threat to No One" was recently featured in a Latin Post article "Immigration News 2014: Hispanic Community Unites On Saturday For Nationwide Anti-Deportation Rally".

Published in the Latin Post