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Tribute Donations

Remember those people who are or who have influenced your life by paying tribute to them.  A tribute donation to the American Immigration Council provides a meaningful way to remember or recognize those who have made a significant impact on you, your family or your colleagues.

A tribute donation can be made in honor or in memory of someone.  For each tribute, we will notify the honored individual or family of your special gift, keeping the amount confidential. 

You can make a tribute donation online (be sure to fill out “In Honor or In Memory” portion of the form and complete the dedication information) or by completing this form and mailing it to:

 

 American Immigration Council
c/o Megan Hess
1333 G Street, NW
Suite 200
Washington, DC  20005

 

Or you may fax the form to the attention of Megan Hess at (202) 742-5619.

If you have any questions at all regarding giving a contribution to the American Immigration Council, please contact Megan Hess at (202)507-7517 or mhess@immcouncil.org.

Three Madera 5th Graders in Top 10 – Northern California Writing Contest

Published on Sat, May 26, 2012

When the top 10 winners of a Northern California creative-writing contest for fifth graders took the stage in San Francisco Wednesday night, three of them were from El Cerrito's Madera Elementary School.

The Northern California "Celebrate America Creative Writing Contest," now in its 10th year, challenged fifth graders to write essays or poems on the theme, "Why I Am Glad America Is a Nation of Immigrants."

Read more...

Published in the ElCerritoPatch

J-1 Trainees and Interns

RESOURCES FOR J-1 TRAINEES AND INTERNS

The American Immigration Council is designated by the U.S. Department of State to sponsor J-1 intern and trainee programs. Intern programs have a maximum duration of 12 months. Trainee programs have a maximum duration of 18 months. Potential J-1 interns must be enrolled in a post-secondary, degree-granting academic program located outside of the United States or graduated within the past 12 months from such post-secondary academic program outside of the United States. Potential J-1 trainees must hold a post-secondary degree related to the field of the training and one (1) year of related work experience, both of which were gained outside of the United States, or have five (5) years of related work experience gained outside of the United States.

Application Checklist - Information RequirementsRead more...

Why a rare bipartisan consensus on immigration totally fell apart

Published on Fri, Sep 21, 2012

Mary Giovagnoli, director of the Immigration Policy Center, helps explain what happened to the STEM visa proposal in this Washington Post article:  Read more...

Published in the The Washington Post

Emmanuel Irono

Emmanuel O. Irono came to the United States as a foreign exchange student and planned to return to Nigeria after college to work for his father's construction company. But when both of his parents died within two years, he decided against returning and began paying his tuition by working as a school janitor.

After graduating, Mr. Irono took a job working as a budget analyst for a federal contractor. However, he wanted to start his own firm, and he bought out a small struggling janitorial service company's supplies for $10,000 and turned it into $14 million profit generator. He renamed the company Motir, in honor of his parents - Memory of Theresa Irono Romonus (MOTIR).

With an exceptional track record in senior level management and administration, Mr. Irono has grown Motir Inc. from one division of custodial services to a full scale management consulting company with divisions for Construction and Environmental Services, Facilities Management and Medical Staffing.

Never forgetting his roots, the Nigerian born Irono has traveled all over the world and has created a company of diversity that continues to give back to his homeland through his non profit organization TIS (To Inspire Strong) African Children Fund. TIS feeds, educates and provides medical treatment for the children of Africa. Whether feeding the hungry and abandoned, supplying educational tools for rural area school children, or implementing an AIDS Awareness Program, Mr. Irono is taking local action and reaching global heights.

As Chief Executive Officer, Mr. Irono has served on the Board of Directors of major organizations, while continuing to direct all aspects of Motir's operational policies, objectives, and initiatives responsible for the attainment of both short and long term goals.Read more...

AIC Executive Director Ben Johnson Quoted in the New York Times

Published on Wed, Jun 12, 2013

Ben Johnson, the AIC's Executive Director was quoted in a New York Times article titled "Obama Backs Bill to Overhaul Immigration as Debate is Set."  From the article:

"Other experts said Mr. Obama had learned from hard experience during the health care and budget debates about the right time to lie low and the right time to insert himself in the process.

"'There’s no question that the president has a delicate dance,' said Ben Johnson, the executive director of the American Immigration Council. 'He’s got to strike the right tone and the right balance of using the office effectively and not trampling on the process that’s currently under way.'"

Published in the New York Times

Roberto G. Gonzales Ph.D.

Roberto G. Gonzales Ph.D. is an Assistant Professor at the University Of Washington School Of Social Work. He earned his Ph.D. in the department of sociology at the University of California. His research focuses on the ways in which legal and educational institutions shape the everyday experiences and the transitions to adulthood of poor, minority, and immigrant youth. Current projects include a four and a half year study of undocumented immigrant young adults in Los Angeles, a companion study in Seattle, and comparative projects on immigrant youth in the U.S. and Europe. Gonzales is the author of When Do Papers Matter? An Institutional Analysis of Undocumented Life in the United States (forthcoming), Young Lives on Hold: The College Dreams of Undocumented Students and Why Integration Matters: Undocumented Immigrant Youth and Making a Case for Moving Beyond Enforcement and his work appears in numerous publications.Read more...

New IPC Report Featured in USA Today

Published on Wed, Dec 11, 2013

The IPC's new report, "Bordering on Criminal: The Routine Abuse of Migrants in the Removal System," was featured in a USA Today article titled, "Report: Migrants in Custody Often Abused."

"Mexican migrants are frequently subjected to physical abuse and verbal mistreatment while in custody of U.S. border authorities, according to a new study.

"Migrants also frequently have possessions taken from them while in U.S. custody that are not returned, according to the study released Tuesday by the Immigration Policy Center, a Washington, D.C., think tank. The study was conducted jointly with researchers at the University of Arizona, Georgetown University and the University of Texas-El Paso.

"The study comes as Congress considers immigration reforms including bills calling for the addition of thousands of new Border Patrol agents.

"Researchers said the frequency of abuses suggest systemic problems resulting from the lack of transparency and accountability within the Border Patrol and U.S. Customs and Border Protection. They recommended that Congress pass legislation that creates stronger oversight and accountability when abuses occur."

Published in the USA Today

Robert L. Smith

Robert L. Smith is a veteran journalist who covers international cultures and immigration issues for the Cleveland Plain Dealer, Ohio’s largest newspaper. Bob grew up in Cleveland, where he lives with his wife, Cleveland Orchestra violinist Chul‐In Park, and their two children, Jae, 5, and Sun‐Hee, 3. He has written extensively about immigration issues and has interviewed people at all points of the immigrant experience, from undocumented field workers to hugely successful entrepreneurs.

Senate Health Care Reform Bill: Heavy on Rhetoric, Short on Policy

Released on Wed, Sep 16, 2009

While attempting to reform the nation's health care system, both Congress and the White House are facing considerable pressure to include immigration-related restrictions that are long on rhetoric and short on results. Faced with pressure from the right and immigration restrictionists, the new Senate mark includes over-the-top measures to exclude illegal immigrants and restrict the participation of legal immigrants. These poor policies are nonsensical, do not protect public health, and will undoubtedly result in the exclusion of U.S. citizens. Furthermore, inclusion of these provisions has failed to win support of the very critics they were trying to appease.

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