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Jhoon Rhee

The Father of American Tae Kwon Do

Grandmaster Jhoon Rhee, a 10th Degree Black Belt, is considered the "Father of American Tae Kwon Do." Grandmaster Rhee's first trip to America was on June 1, 1956, for a short military training program soon after the Korean War. In 1957, he returned as a freshman to Southwest Texas State Teachers College in San Marcos, Texas with $46 in his pocket. English was his biggest obstacle. It took him half an hour to read a single page. Through perseverance and discipline, Grandmaster Rhee has become one of the most prominent motivational public speakers in the world today, encouraging individuals to achieve self-discipline, self-esteem and self-defense through the development of academic, moral, and physical excellence.

Grandmaster Jhoon Rhee has been involved in every aspect of Tae Kwon Do. He has opened schools in order to teach not only the physical techniques of Tae Kwon Do, but the inseparable mental aspects, as well. His Martial Arts philosophy calls for building true confidence through knowledge in the mind, honesty in the heart, and strength in the body. His philosophy and seminars center around rediscovering the vision of America's Founding Fathers by restoring mental discipline in America and in the world.Read more...

AIC Executive Director Ben Johnson Published in Arizona Daily Star

Published on Sun, Jul 28, 2013

The American Immigration Council's Executive Director, Benjamin Johnson, was published as a guest columnist for the Arizona Daily Star this weekend, in an article titled, "Legalizing Undocumented Immigrants Makes Economic Sense."

"The mass deportation of immigrants would cause a steep reduction in labor supply. Because labor is a key factor of production, a drastic reduction in its supply would in turn lead to a contraction of the state economy and a decline in overall state fiscal revenue.

Pull people out of the economy and it shrinks. In fact, more than 60 percent of all undocumented immigrants have been living and working in the state for more than a decade, which makes it even more destructive to the economy. Thus, 'deportation only' is anything but good policy.

What would happen if nothing changes? If we fail to reform the immigration system, we may not necessarily lose a lot from an economic perspective, but we stand to gain very little.

Immigrants, even the unauthorized, are already contributing to the state's economy. For example, immigrants already account for 15 percent of total economic output in the Phoenix metropolitan area, according to a study by the Fiscal Policy Institute."

Published in the Arizona Daily Star

Natasha Iskander

Natasha Iskander, Assistant Professor of Public Policy at New York University’s Wagner School of Public Service, conducts research on labor migration and its relationship to economic development; labor mobilization and its relationship to workforce development; and processes of institutional innovation and organizational learning. Her work examines how the dislocations caused by migration provide opportunities for knowledge creation and economic development.

 

AIC Immigrant Youth Achievement Award Winner Featured in Las Vegas Sun

Published on Tue, Apr 08, 2014

Astrid Silva, the 2014 receipent of the American Immigration Council’s Immigrant Youth Achievement Award, was recently featured in a Las Vegas Sun article titled "Las Vegas immigration advocate Astrid Silva earns national honor".

"A prominent immigration reform advocate and community organizer from Las Vegas who has helped influence Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid garnered more national recognition this week.

The American Immigration Council’s Immigrant Youth Achievement Award winner is Astrid Silva, an organizer for the Progressive Leadership Alliance of Nevada.

Silva has been on of the most visible faces of Las Vegas’ immigration reform movement, going public with her undocumented status before getting a work permit through the deferred action for childhood arrivals program."

Published in the Las Vegas Sun

Gifts of Stock

 

 

Donating stock to the American Immigration Council is a great alternative to cash. Instead of selling it and letting Uncle Sam enjoy the benefits of the gain, donate the stock to the Council and enjoy the tax savings of the charitable donation yourself.

When donating appreciated stock to a charitable organization like the American Immigration Council you do not have to recognize the gain. It’s a win-win situation: you are able to make a charitable contribution toward the Council’s mission and avoid tax on the appreciation in value of the stock.

If you would like to make a donation of securities to the Council, please follow the instructions below.

Electronic Transfer for Stocks and Bonds to electronically transfer stocks and bonds to the American Immigration Council

1) Please direct your broker to transfer your securities to the following account:

DTC instructions:

Firm Name: Wells Fargo AdvisorsRead more...

IPC Lauds Obama Administration for Beginning Immigration Reform Discussion

Released on Tue, Jun 23, 2009

Tomorrow, President Obama and Congressional leaders will meet to chart a roadmap designed to move comprehensive immigration reform forward in 2009. The President has already begun solving our nation's toughest problems and has promised to tackle our broken immigration system in his first year in office. Leaders in Congress are also committed to moving immigration reform this year and their efforts are buoyed by a groundswell of support from the majority of Americans who want immigration reform.

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Lisa S. Roney

Lisa S. Roney retired in 2009 as Director of the Research and Evaluation Division of the Office of Policy and Strategy at U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) following 39 years as a policy analyst and manager with USCIS and the legacy Immigration and Naturalization Service.  She served on the staff of the Interagency Task Force on Immigration Law and Policy and was a Senior Research Associate with the Select Commission on Immigration and Refugee Policy. She was responsible for monitoring and reporting on implementation of the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986 and research on the legalized immigrant population.  She is currently an independent immigration consultant working with Westat on evaluation of electronic employment verification programs. She received a B.A. from Hood College and an M.P.A. from American University.

 

Experts' Comments Slam E-Verify Program

Released on Sun, Aug 10, 2008

Final comments are due today on a rule that would make E-Verify mandatory for approximately 200,000 public and private federal government contractors and their 4 million employees.

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Immigration in Kentucky

The Community Education Center Sponsors the 13th Annual “Celebrate America” Creative Writing Contest

Released on Thu, Oct 15, 2009

The contest kicks off on October 16, 2009 under the yearly theme, "Why I am Glad America is a Nation of Immigrants." Through this contest, fifth graders around the country are given the opportunity to embrace the United States' immigrant history through their poetry, essays, or other creative works.

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