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New Hampshire Reacts to Feds' Arizona Challenge

Published on Wed, Jul 07, 2010

Benjamin Johnson, executive director of the American Immigration Council, called the lawsuit filed yesterday an important step for the federal government to reassert its authority over immigration policy.

"While a legal challenge by the Department of Justice won't resolve the public's frustration with our broken immigration system, it will seek to define and protect the federal government's constitutional authority to manage immigration," Johnson said.

Published in the New Hampshire Union Leader

Objecting to Video Merits Hearings

This Practice Advisory discusses the problems arising from the use of video hearings, and suggests ways to protect the respondent's rights and move for in-person hearings where that strategy is selected.

Published On: Sunday, December 12, 2004 | Download File

Just What is Executive Action? A Lesson From the Principal’s Desk

Much has been made of the president’s use of executive action in order to carry out the nation’s laws. It is a vague term that puzzles many in the media and raises large questions. Is it legal? Is it an abuse of power? Is it constitutional? Has it been used by Democratic and Republican presidents alike?

As suggested by the title, “Just What is Executive Action? A Lesson from the Principal’s Desk” students will apply inductive reasoning skills about individual school policies that are determined by the principal in order to understand what execution action is and its limitations. Students will apply their knowledge of school policy in order to define executive action in their own words as well as to read the media for accuracy and bias. An extension of this activity is also available for students to closely read a report Executive Grants of Temporary Immigration Relief, 1956-Present published by the American Immigration Council.

  • For lesson procedures, Common Core standards alignment, please click here.
  • For the student handout close-read of Executive Grants of Temporary Immigration Relief, 1956-Present, please click here.
  • Click here to tell us how you’ve used this lesson plan

 

Year Released: 2014

9-12

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Democrats Fight Back on Immigration

Published on Thu, Jul 29, 2010

Benjamin Johnson, executive director of the more liberal American Immigration Council, countered that for some conservatives, "it's never enough." Over the last seven years, Johnson said, the U.S. has quintupled its number of border agents and quadrupled its immigration enforcement budget -- "but the appetite for increasing immigration enforcement-only policy seems to be never-ending. I can only conclude that it's because constantly raising the bar on how much we need to spend and what constitutes secure borders at this point seems like an excuse for not doing anything else."

Published in the Atlantic

Ineffective Assistance of Counsel

Noncitizens facing removal must have a meaningful opportunity to present their cases to an immigration judge.  On occasion, noncitizens are deprived of this opportunity due to their lawyers’ incompetence or mistake.  Although the government has recognized the need for a remedy for ineffective assistance of counsel, see Matter of Lozada, the framework currently used to evaluate whether ineffective assistance has occurred is severely flawed. The LAC has long worked to protect the right to effective assistance of counsel for noncitizens in removal proceedings.

CASES | ADVOCACY

CASES

Labissiere v. Holder, No. 13-2377 (2d Cir. amicus brief submitted Mar. 21, 2014)Read more...

Creating Inclusive Classroom Culture

Enlist your students in creating a classroom culture that welcomes and celebrates diverse talents and skills. Students first read a short story “Draw One for Me” written by Susan K. Coti. Then they participate in multimodal activities and discussion to reflect on classroom social dynamics and welcoming newcomer students. Read more...

Year Released: 2016

3-6

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Is immigration an Ohio problem? Numbers say no

Published on Mon, Aug 30, 2010

The Immigration Policy Center, which is on the opposite end of the immigration debate from the federation, argues that their inclusion as a cost of illegal immigration is misleading.

"They are U.S. citizens and denying them education, health care, financial assistance, etc.. would put them at a disadvantage compared to other U.S. citizens," spokeswoman Michele Waslin wrote in an e-mail. "In financial terms, it could probably cost the state much more in the long run to have a population of poorly educated, unhealthy citizens."

Published in the Lancaster Eagle Gazette

American Immigration Council v. ICE

Entire Document Production, August 13, 2012

Key Documents:

Pages 430 – 432, Pages 805 – 816, Pages 845 – 847, Page 859, Pages 876 – 879: 2010 Letter from immigration attorney, ICE response, and ICE redacted emails regarding Miranda warnings during 287(g) jail screenings

Pages 447 – 448: Talking points on right to counsel in ICE examinations prepared for then-Acting Principal Legal Advisor Barry O’Mellin in advance of the 2009 AILA Annual Conference; addresses access to counsel during 287.3 interrogation and the right to counsel during a worksite enforcement operation

Pages 736 – 747: Office of the Principal Legal Advisor power point: Interviewing Aliens of Interest in National Security Cases, 2009

Pages 782 – 783, Pages 788 – 789, Pages 830 – 831, Page 841: ICE redacted emails regarding right to counsel in I-213 examinations, in response to a question from AILA’s ICE Liaison Committee in 2009

Pages 817 – 820: ICE redacted emails regarding lack of access to counsel for workers arrested in a February 8, 2008 ICE worksite raidRead more...

Should America's illegal immigrants be offered legal status?

Published on Tue, Oct 12, 2010

Americans are justifiably frustrated that 11 million unauthorized immigrants now live in the United States. Yet the majority of them would have preferred to come legally; there was simply no way under current immigration laws. Moreover, most of them are working, paying taxes, and buying US goods. Other than lacking legal status, most are law-abiding residents. Many are married to US citizens, with children who are citizens.

The problem is that they are often willing to accept low wages and poor working conditions, which creates unfair competition for US workers and gives unscrupulous employers an unfair advantage over law-abiding employers.

We could continue on the same path we have pursued for two decades: spending more money on enforcement and passing increasingly harsh laws in an attempt to drive unauthorized immigrants out. But despite the billions of dollars we’ve spent building walls, hiring border patrol agents, and detaining and deporting hundreds of thousands, the unauthorized population hasn’t decreased significantly.

Instead of “enforcement only,” we should offer unauthorized immigrants a chance to come forward, register, pay a fine, learn English, pass background checks, and legalize their status.

Legalizing them would inject a new level of certainty into their lives, allowing them to invest more in themselves and their communities. Legalized immigrants will earn more, pay more taxes, consume more, buy houses, start businesses, and contribute more to the economy.

Americans want real solutions to the problem of unauthorized immigration that are practical and fair. Enforcement alone has failed. We need comprehensive immigration reform that includes a legalization program.

– Michele Waslin, senior policy analyst, American Immigration Council’s Immigration Policy Center

Published in the The Christian Science Monitor