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Backlash against Kris Kobach on immigration is growing

Published on Thu, Feb 09, 2012

Kris Kobach’s ears should be burning.

Backlash built this week against the Kansas secretary of state for gallivanting state-to-state, drumming up support for laws bent on driving illegal immigrants out.

The rebukes aren’t coming from his usual critics, those who display sanity about the federal reforms needed to effectively deal with illegal immigration.

No, Kobach’s supporters are barking back now. The legislators and taxpayers who bought into his schemes to make the lives of illegal immigrants so hellish that they “self-deport.”

The editorial board of the Press-Register in Mobile, Ala., accused Kobach of banking on exactly what happened there — costly court challenges and a wide-range of unintended consequences for legal residents.

“Alabama allowed itself to be used as a guinea pig on illegal immigration so that a Kansas lawyer could build his political career,” the editorial said.

So Alabama’s legislature has gone to work, figuring out how to rewrite or repeal the damage done by Kobach’s handiwork, measures passed in 2011.

On Monday, the Immigration Policy Center released “Discrediting ‘Self Deportation’ As Immigration Policy.” Yes, you can make life harsh for immigrants, but everyone else suffers, too. Economists predict Alabama’s gross domestic product will lose up to $10.8 billion as a result, and $57 million to $264 million more in state income and sales tax collections could evaporate.

Oops.

Anyway, data are beginning to show that immigrants don’t self-deport in substantial numbers.

It’s all sleight of hand, a hustle that eventually will reach the U.S. Supreme Court.

Missouri also stood out in national conversations for being among the gullible states where chasing around illegal immigrants is still gathering traction, despite experiences elsewhere.Read more...

Published in the The Kansas City Star

New Media Internship

The Immigration Policy Center (IPC), the research and policy arm of the American Immigration Council, is seeking a New Media Intern to assist with its online presence and social networking capacity. Applicants should possess strong communications and new media skills, as well as a passion for the future of immigration.

Responsibilities include:

  • Updating IPC website, blog and publications
  • Blog/new media outreach
  • Archiving media clips
  • Generating dialogue in social networking spaces
  • Gathering and maintaining media contact lists (relevant websites, blogs, print, audio and visual media)
  • Integrating new media technologies into IPC's communication strategies
  • Supporting staff as needed

Qualifications and Skills

  • Interest in immigration
  • Basic HTML skills preferred, but not required
  • Understanding of blog culture and new media world
  • Basic Wordpress and blogging skills
  • Familiar with a wide-range of online social networks and new media technologies
  • Strong written and verbal communication skills
  • Strong organizational skills
  • Student working on BS/BA or MS/MA degree in Communication/Journalism/New Media or related field with a strong interest in immigration
  • Sense of humor a must

Compensation
Non-paid, school credit available

Schedule
Flexible, preferably 3-4 days a week

Duration
Five to Six Months

Application Procedure
Application process is rolling. Please send us a resume and cover letter stating your knowledge of and experience with new media—including relevant classes and related work experience.  Your cover letter should also demonstrate your interest in immigration and what you hope to gain from this internship.Read more...

Letter to the Editor: Where Arizona’s immigration law is flawed

Published on Sun, Apr 29, 2012

Despite the Supreme Court justices’ apparent skepticism [“Justices receptive to parts of Arizona’s immigration law,” front page, April 26], the immigration status checks required by Arizona’s law subvert federal enforcement priorities and procedures. Section 2(B) requires Arizona police to verify the immigration status of all individuals arrested. This will result in thousands of additional verification requests to the federal government every year, significantly delay response times and divert scarce enforcement resources away from high-priority targets.

Section 2(B) also requires that, in the event of a lawful stop or an investigative detention, police check immigration status only if they have “reasonable suspicion” an individual is unlawfully present. Given the cursory nature of such stops, the complexities of federal immigration law and minimal guidance from the state law, police — under threat of civil damages — will be forced to rely on impermissible criteria such as race to make these determinations.

Such an arbitrary and unjust process contradicts the comprehensive enforcement scheme embodied in federal immigration law.

Melissa Crow, North Potomac

Published in the The Washington Post

Enforcement

Enforcement

The LAC engages in administrative advocacy and targeted litigation to protect the rights of noncitizens facing removal, encourage the favorable exercise of prosecutorial discretion in appropriate cases, promote greater transparency regarding DHS enforcement practices, and ensure that immigration officers are held accountable for misconduct. We also provide practice advisories, mentoring and other support to attorneys representing immigrants arrested in enforcement actions and placed in removal proceedings.Read more...

DHS Unveils Guidance for Deferred Action for Qualfied Young Illegal Aliens

Published on Mon, Aug 06, 2012

Homeland Security Today cited the IPC's study, "Who And Where the DREAMers Are," in an in-depth article describing the new criteria surrounding Obama's deferred action plan:

Read more...

Published in the Homeland Security Today

Supreme Court Case involving Arizona: A Resource Guide

The IPC Cited in the Guardian

Published on Wed, Apr 17, 2013

The IPC was cited in an article discussing Florida Senator Marco Rubio's attempts to promote the new Senate "Group of Eight" immigration bill.  Here's an except:

"'Right now nobody benefits from the status quo,' Rubio told Univision's Jorge Ramos in an interview in Spanish. 'The only people who benefit right now are the criminals abusing the people who cross [the border] and the employers who abuse their workers by paying their workers less.'

Rubio is right but he has to make a stronger case. He should explain that immigrants are not a drain but a net benefit for the United States, if there is a pathway to green cards and citizenship for the 11 million undocumented living in the United States.

What Rubio didn't detail is how the undocumented contribute to the economy by paying taxes. If they are given legal residency and citizenship, they will be able to contribute more over time. According to the Immigration Policy Center, households headed by undocumented immigrants paid a combined $11.2bn in state and local taxes in 2010."

Published in the Guardian

David Bartlett, Ph.D.

David Bartlett, Ph.D., who has a Ph.D. in political science from the University of California, San Diego, is president of the Global Economics Company in Minneapolis, Minnesota, and Adjunct Professor of Strategic Management and Organization at the Carlson School of Management, University of Minnesota. His book, The Political Economy of Dual Transformations: Market Reform and Democratization, won the 1998 Hewett Prize from the American Association for the Advancement of Slavic Studies.Read more...

IPC Senior Fellow Rob Paral Published in Houston Chronicle

Published on Wed, Sep 11, 2013

Rob Paral, a Senior Fellow at the Immigration Policy Center and the author of our recently published Special Report, "Stepping Up:  The Impact of the Newest Immigrant, Asian, and Latino Voters," made the case in the Houston Chronicle that the long-term demographic shift in many Republican and Democratic districts makes immigration reform even more of an urgent priority:

"A new analysis of immigration trends and demographic composition of U.S. House districts shows that many Republican congressional districts have emerging electorates that care deeply about immigration reform.

"Many Republican representatives will see their constituency profiles evolve in the coming years. Asian and Latino youth and newly naturalized U.S. citizens will make up 34 percent of newly eligible voters in 55 Republican-held congressional districts."

Published in the Houston Chronicle

Stewart J. Lawrence

Stewart J. Lawrence is a veteran news journalist and public policy analyst who writes frequently on immigration and Latino affairs. In recent years, his commentaries have appeared in The Los Angeles Times, Christian Science Monitor, Politico, the Guardian, and The World and I. He is also founder and managing director of Puentes & Associates, Inc., a bilingual survey research and communications firm.