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Litigation Clearinghouse Newsletter Vol. 2, No. 10

This issue covers litigation challenging USCIS's failure to provide evidence of LPR status, new Supreme Court rules, and asylum resources.

Published On: Monday, August 27, 2007 | Download File

International study points out U.S. immigration policy successes, failures

Published on Tue, Mar 01, 2011

The United States ranks ninth out of 31 countries in an international study evaluating immigrant integration policies released this week.

The Migrant Integration Policy Index (aka MIPEX), produced by the British Council and the Migration Policy Group, evaluates seven areas: labor market mobility, family reunion, education, political participation, long-term residence, access to nationality and anti-discrimination measures in all European Union member states plus Norway, Switzerland, Canada and for the first time the U.S.

The Immigration Policy Center, the research and policy arm of the American Immigration Council, served as a U.S partner for the study, and helped answer questions and gather information from various American expert.

The study indicates that strong U.S. anti-discrimination laws protect immigrants and guarantee them equal rights and opportunities, a model for immigration rules elsewhere.

Mary Giovagnoli, director of the Immigration Policy Center, told The Florida Independent that the U.S invests very little in immigrant integration and that budget cuts at the state and federal level put the country’s positive ranking at risk. She added that policymakers need to know that helping people to integrate and learn English provides a large return on investment.

Giovagnoli explained that the MIPEX study can help guide best practices, so the U.S. can learn from other countries like Canada that have a thoughtful integration policy, and help other countries learn from areas where the U.S. shows positive advances.

According to the study, U.S legal status gives most migrant workers and their families some of the same chances in the labor market as native-born Americans, but immigrants often take jobs far below their skill level.Read more...

Published in the American Independent

Litigation Clearinghouse Newsletter Vol. 4, No. 12

This issue highlights a case rejecting the CIMT analysis in Silva-Trevino, Supreme Court developments, adjustment of status for K-2 visa holders who turn 21, Track 3 FOIA litigation, motions to dismiss immigration cases in district court, and a settlement in a class action for passport applicants.

Published On: Thursday, November 5, 2009 | Download File

The Green and White World of Egoitz Iturrixa Zubiri

May, 2009
Egoitz Iturrixa Zubiri

The Exchange Visitor Program is proud to announce Egoitz Iturrixa Zubiri as May's Exchange Visitor of the Month. Each month, we select an exchange visitor who has made an effort to get involved in his/her community and explore American Culture. Read more...

Tennessee's Undocumented Immigrants Paid Taxes to the Tune of $157 Million

Published on Tue, Apr 19, 2011

It's a familiar refrain: Undocumented immigrants come to the United States, contribute nothing and benefit handsomely from the Nanny State. And it's dead wrong.

In fact, according to estimates by the Institute for Taxation and Economic Policy and the Immigration Policy Center, households headed by undocumented immigrants paid more than $157 million in sales and property taxes here in Tennessee in 2010. Nationwide, they paid an estimated $11 billion in state and local taxes.

A 2005 Economic Report to the President points out that half of all undocumented immigrants are "believed to be working on the books," meaning they contribute to the tax rolls but remain ineligible for nearly every federal public assistance program. Even if their employer withholds Social Security taxes, they'll never benefit from a system they pay into.

Tennessee lawmakers are proposing legislation this session that would seek to make every facet of life in the state even more inhospitable for undocumented immigrants (see Thursday's Scene). But they might consider the numbers, especially this one: Tennessee ranks 14th on the list of 50 for most taxes paid by those with no legal right to be here.

Published in the Nashville Scene

Arizona SB 1070‎, Legal Challenges and Economic Realities

ARCHIVED ISSUE PAGE (LAST UPDATED AUGUST 2011)

Arizona’s controversial immigration enforcement law, "Support Our Law Enforcement and Safe Neighborhoods Act" (SB 1070, amended by HB 2162) requires state and local law enforcement agencies to check the immigration status of individuals it encounters and makes it a state crime for noncitizens to fail to carry proper immigration documentation. Soon after Arizona’s governor signed the bill, challenges to the law were filed. This page highlights the suits challenging the Arizona law. Read about challenges to other state and local laws at the State and Local Law Enforcement Litigation Issue Page.

Cases | Other Arizona Litigation | Litigation-related Articles and Resources | Economic Realities

Cases

Ninth Circuit Upholds Temporary Injunction Against SB 1070; Arizona Appeals Ruling to Supreme Court

United States of America v. State of Arizona, No. 10-01413 (D. Ariz. prelim. injunction granted July 28, 2010); prelim. injunction aff’d , No. 10-16645 (9th Cir. April 11, 2011); petition for certiorari filed, No. 11-182 (Aug. 10, 2011)

Recent developments:

On April 11, 2011, the Ninth Circuit upheld a temporary injunction against four provisions of SB 1070 entered last July by U.S. District Judge Susan Bolton.  The Ninth Circuit’s ruling thus continued to block enforcement of provisions that:Read more...

A Conversation with Sabine Mucha

November, 2011

Congratulations to Sabine Mucha, our Exchange Visitor of the Month. We recently caught up with Sabine to learn more about her J-1 visa experience.

Tell me about your training:
EMD Serono is the US side of my German company. I’m training in pharmaceutical services. I hope when I go back to Germany I can share all of the new things I learned even after 10 years in the field!

Read more...

Gov. Deval Patrick Is Latest to Buck Obama Deportation Program

Published on Thu, Jun 09, 2011

This week Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick joined a growing chorus of governors standing up against the federal government’s immigration enforcement agenda when he announced that he would not enter his state into Secure Communities. The program, which is supposed to target immigrants who commit serious crimes for deportation, has been controversial in that it has deported streams of people, both documented and undocumented, who were convicted of minor offenses or, in some cases, none at all.

The Department of Homeland Security responded to Gov. Patrick by immediately slamming the door on the state’s efforts to keep out of the program. An anonymous DHS official told the Boston Globe that the state’s participation is not optional. Immigrant rights advocates say DHS is setting itself up for a legal fight over what’s quickly becoming its most controversial immigration enforcement program.

“The tide is turning on S‐Comm,” said Pablo Alvarado, the executive director of the National Day Laborer Organizing Network, which is coordinating a national effort to dismantle Secure Communities. “A chorus of opposition to the program is growing louder as the migrant rights movement demands a reversal of politics that criminalize immigrants.”

Under Secure Communities, local authorities mush share the fingerprints of anyone booked in a local or county jail with federal immigration authorities. People without immigration documents and documented immigrants with prior criminal convictions get marked for deportation proceedings, even if they’re never charged with or convicted of a crime. The controversial and rapidly expanding program has become the marquee immigration enforcement program of the Obama administration’s deportation agenda. It’s currently operating in 42 states, and the administration hopes to expand it to the entire country by 2013.Read more...

Published in the Colorlines Magazine

Remand Rule

Gonzales v. Thomas, 547 U.S. 183 (2006)Read more...

  • In a per curiam decision dated April 17, 2006, the Supreme Court vacated the Ninth Circuit’s decision and remanded the case for further consideration of the asylum claim.