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Quick Fact: Immigrants make up the majority of computer science students

Two-thirds of electrical engineering and computer science graduate students at U.S. colleges are foreign nationals

Immigration showdowns: Federal government challenging state laws in court

Published on Sun, Dec 11, 2011

CHARLESTON, SOUTH CAROLINA: In October, the U.S. Department of Justice challenged South Carolina's immigration law in federal court, charging that parts of the law are "unconstitutional and interfere with the federal government's authority to set and enforce immigration policy."

In April, the Justice Department succeeded in blocking some provisions of the newly enacted Arizona immigration law, and in October, some of Alabama's controversial provisions were temporarily blocked. Last month, the federal government sued Utah.

"A patchwork of immigration laws is not the answer and will only create further problems in our immigration system," Attorney General Eric Holder said in a statement Nov. 22. "The federal government is the chief enforcer of immigration laws, and while we appreciate cooperation from states, which remains important, it is clearly unconstitutional for a state to set its own immigration policy."

South Carolina officials, including Gov. Nikki Haley, echoing the concerns of leaders in other states, say that local authorities cannot wait any more for the federal government to institute comprehensive immigration reform and must act now to secure borders and protect citizens and legal residents.

"If the Feds were doing their job, we wouldn't have had to address illegal immigration reform at the state level," Haley spokesman Rob Godfrey said recently.

The Obama administration has ramped up deportation actions.

About 1.1 million illegal immigrants have been deported since the beginning of 2009, and the Department of Homeland Security is dealing with a backlog of about 300,000 cases. By comparison, a total of 1.57 million were deported during President George W. Bush's two terms.Read more...

Published in the Post and Courier

American Immigration Council Store

All proceeds from the purchase of books go to the American Immigration Council and its educational initiatives. Scroll down to check out our inventory of signed copies of immigration related books.

Price: $20

 

Davy Brown Discovers His Roots

By Keely Alexander and Velani Mynhardt

The American Immigration Council partnered with authors Velani Mynhardt Witthöft and Keely Alexander of Keely Velani LLC and created Davy Brown Discovers His Roots. The colorfully illustrated book tells the story of a young boy and his friends as they discover that everybody has an immigration story, whether their families arrived today or generations ago. The story, which is aimed toward 7-12 year olds, is a great way to introduce the concept of the many ways people come to the United States permanently and temporarily. It is a perfect conversation starter for a family discovering their roots or for a classroom teacher starting a unit on immigration.

Read more...

Spanish language media: GOP presidential candidates move forward with immigration policies despite Latino disapproval

Published on Mon, Feb 27, 2012

GOP presidential candidates have voiced their support for immigration policies that leave out most Latino voters, who are looking for a common sense solution to the issue, but Democrats are not doing much better, participants in Spanish language Univision news show Al Punto said Sunday.

Immigration policies supported by GOP presidential candidates “do not articulate a poltical or economic position that is realistic,”said Viviana Hurtado, of the Wise Latina Club, on Al Punto.

According to TIME magazine’s Tim Padgett, ”the Latino community, especially the Mexican American community, do not want an open door policy that lets anybody in.” What they want, said Padgett, “is a common sense policy” – something neither Democrats nor Republicans have offered.

Padgett added that “Democrats are doing well with Latinos only because Republicans are doing so badly.”

Sylvia Manzano, of Latino Decisions, wrote Sunday that “Republican candidates have devoted quite a bit of time to issues disproportionately affecting Latinos, asserting their party and ideological bona fides on topics like official English language laws, immigration, Mexican border control, the DREAM Act, bilingual education and various identification laws. From the vantage point of most Latino voters, the Republican party champions positions opposite to their interests.”

According to the The Guardian, Kris Kobach, author of the controversial immigration enforcement laws in Arizona and Alabama, ”has been in direct discussions with [Mitt Romney] the presidential candidate about possible changes to federal policy should Romney win the Republican nomination and go on to take the White House.”

Kobach, current Kansas Secretary of State, is a long-time supporter of “attrition through enforcement” policies, which Romney himself has called “self-deportation.”Read more...

Published in the Florida Independent

Mission

About the Immigration Policy Center

The Immigration Policy Center (IPC) is the research and policy arm of the American Immigration Council. IPC's mission is to shape a rational conversation on immigration and immigrant integration. Through its research and analysis, IPC provides policymakers, the media, and the general public with accurate information about the role of immigrants and immigration policy in U.S. society. IPC reports and materials are widely disseminated and relied upon by press and policy makers. IPC staff regularly serves as experts to leaders on Capitol Hill, opinion-makers and the media. IPC, formed in 2003 is a non-partisan organization that neither supports nor opposes any political party or candidate for office.

What We Do

Contributing Research

The IPC researches important issues related to immigration (such as the impact of immigration on the economy, jobs and crime). Our work is geared toward providing a solid, fact-based foundation for the immigration debate.

Bridging the Gap

The IPC's work helps to bridge the gap between advocates and academics, policy experts and politicians. Through forums, briefings and special publications, we bring diverse groups together to help shape the immigration debate.

Getting the Facts

All too often, the debate about immigration is dominated by fear and misinformation. IPC works to make sure that fact is separated from fiction. To do this, we monitor and rapidly respond to statements made by anti-immigration groups, providing lawmakers, the media and the general public with accurate, up-to-date information.Read more...

"A Magical Place in this World"

Published on Tue, May 15, 2012

"There is a magical place in this world,

Where people come to look for freedom and happiness."

Those are the opening lines from a winning poem by Illinois fifth grader and champion gymnast Alexander Tymouch. The poem took the top spot in the 2012 American Immigration Council's annual "Celebrate America" fifth grade creative writing contest

Read more...

Published in the The San Diego Union-Tribune

Matthew Baxter, 1958-2011

Matthew Baxter, Former Council Ambassador, AILA Chapter Chair, Colleague and Friend

On September 15, 2011, Philadelphia AILA member Matthew Baxter passed away from complications of liver disease. He was 53 years old.

Philadelphia’s AILA chapter treasured Matthew as a person who made membership in the association worthwhile. He took on many roles for the Philadelphia Chapter, serving as a Chapter Officer and Chapter Chair, committee chair, mentor, speaker and friend. He was always willing to teach his fellow members, whether at a CLE, on a phone call, or in the hallway outside immigration court. He was deeply involved with education, advocacy and practice support. He served as Chapter Liaison to USCIS and EOIR, working tirelessly on behalf of the Chapter and cooperatively with the agencies to develop solutions to everyday challenges.

He also served two years as Ambassador for the American Immigration Council (AIC), formerly known as AILF. He was a model Ambassador, raising awareness about the organization and its work, touting the accomplishments of the Legal Action Center and Immigration Policy Center, promoting the Creative Writing Contest, attending events as a representative of the AIC and raising money for the organization. His work, his drive and his commitment as an Ambassador helped strengthen the AIC.

Matthew cared deeply about his clients and doing the best job possible for them. His cases were meticulously prepared and elegantly argued. He loved the law and he understood how to use it as a tool for justice.Read more...

Bay Area Immigrants Warned Of Scams As Deferred Deportation Begins

Published on Wed, Aug 15, 2012

CBS San Francisco used IPC's statistics about potential candidates for deferred action in an article last Wednesday.  The article warns Bay Area immigrants to watch out for scams, as more and more people try to take advantage of those applying for deferred deportation. Read more...

Published in the CBS San Francisco

Justice Alma L. López

Justice Alma L. López was born in Laredo, Texas on August 17, 1943, and was raised and educated in San Antonio, Texas. Justice López was appointed to the Fourth Court by Governor Ann Richards in October 1993, becoming the first Hispanic woman to serve on the Fourth Court of Appeals and the first Hispanic woman to serve as Chief Justice in the State of Texas. She was elected to a full term of six (6) years on November 8, 1994, taking office on January 1, 1995. She was re-elected to a second term in November 2000.

Justice López graduated from St. Mary’s University with a B.B.A. in 1965 and from St. Mary’s Law School with a J.D. in 1968. Justice López practiced law for twenty-five years, twenty of those as a sole practitioner prior to being appointed to the Court.

Justice López is the recipient of many awards including the Award for Outstanding Achievement from the Mexican American Bar Association in 1998. She was inducted into the San Antonio Women’s Hall of Fame for Public Service in 2002 and received the National Association of Women Lawyers President’s Award for Excellence in 2004. She is listed in the Who’s Who Among Outstanding Americans.Read more...

IPC Cited in NBC Latino Article

Published on Mon, May 13, 2013

A recent article on NBC Latino drew attention to a recent IPC Fact Sheet, Lost in the Shadow of the Fence.  In the Fact Sheet, we pointed out the importance of the economic relationship between Mexico and the United States, and how that should be remembered during the debates around border enforcement.  Here's a clip of the NBC Latino article:

"The American public is not getting the full picture of the current state of Mexico’s economy and its increasing importance as a trading partner. Mexico is the world’s 12th largest economy and America’s second largest export market...

The Immigration Policy Center’s “Lost in the Shadow of the Fence” states there was a 9.1 percent increase in goods exported to Mexico from the U.S. in just one year, from 2011 to 2012."

Published in the NBC Latino