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Return to the United States After Prevailing on a Petition for Review or Motion to Reopen

This practice advisory contains practical and legal suggestions for individuals seeking to return to the United States after they have prevailed on a petition for review or an administrative motion to reopen or reconsider to the immigration court or Board of Immigration Appeals.

Published On: Friday, December 21, 2012 | Download File

Deferred Action Q&A

Do you have questions about deferred action.  Use this resource from NILC before applying.  Please seek the advice of an immigration attorney should you have ANY questions go to to find an immigration attorney http://www.ailalawyer.com/.  Beware of scam artists and any body who promises fast processing or guaranteed acceptance.

Year Released: 2012

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Illegal Immigrants Account for 8% of U.S. Newborns, Study Shows

Published on Thu, Aug 12, 2010

Because some of these children have one parent who is a legal resident, the Pew study doesn’t bolster the argument to change the 14th amendment, said the Immigration Policy Center, a Washington-based organization that opposes Graham’s initiative.

Published in the Bloomberg

VAWA

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Working with partner non-profits, the LAC convinced USCIS to adopt a policy that allows VAWA applicants to apply for adjustment of status under INA § 245(a) even if the applicant is present in the U.S. without inspection and admission or parole. This policy favorably impacts thousands of battered immigrants.

 

Which Side Will Get the Blame for the Failure of Immigration Reform?

Published on Tue, Oct 12, 2010

“Immigration is a Rubik’s Cube really; in order to solve the puzzle, you can’t just be focused on one side of it,” [the Immigration Policy Center's Mary] Giovagnoli says. “What we’ve done is focus exclusively on one side of the puzzle, the interior-border-enforcement side of things.” [...]

Published in the The Washington Independent

Appointed Counsel for Children in Immigration Proceedings

Each year, the government initiates immigration court proceedings against thousands of children, but does not guarantee that those children have legal representation. Like adults, children who cannot afford to hire an attorney or find pro bono counsel are forced to navigate the complex and adversarial immigration system on their own, even though the government is always represented by a trained attorney.

CASES | RESOURCES

CASES

J.E.F.M. v. Holder

On July 9, 2014, the American Immigration Council, with co-counsel American Civil Liberties Union, Northwest Immigrant Rights Project, Public Counsel, and K&L Gates LLP, filed a nationwide class-action lawsuit in U.S. District Court for the Western District of Washington on behalf of children who are challenging the federal government's failure to provide them with legal representation as it carries out removal proceedings against them.

The complaint charges the U.S. Department of Justice, Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, Department of Health and Human Services, Executive Office for Immigration Review, and Office of Refugee Resettlement with violating the U.S. Constitution's Fifth Amendment Due Process Clause and the Immigration and Nationality Act’s provisions requiring a “full and fair hearing” before an immigration judge. It seeks to require the government to provide children with legal representation in their immigration proceedings.Read more...

Ritter OKs ICE program

Published on Wed, Jan 05, 2011

Late last year, representatives of the Immigration Policy Center of the American Immigration Council, harsh critics of Secure Communities, applauded Ritter’s approach to the program and said it could serve as a model to other states that are unwilling to accept ICE’s conditions for participation. But that did not soften criticisms from some factions in Colorado.

Published in the The Pueblo Cheiftan

Litigation Clearinghouse Newsletter Vol. 2, No. 10

This issue covers litigation challenging USCIS's failure to provide evidence of LPR status, new Supreme Court rules, and asylum resources.

Published On: Monday, August 27, 2007 | Download File