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Quick Fact: Immigrants found large percentage of science and technology firms

Immigrant entrepreneurs have founded or co-founded 25.3% of all science and technology firms in the United States.

Young illegal immigrants coming out

Published on Wed, May 16, 2012

IPC information on the DREAM Act was used in a CovNews Article about undocumented youth 'coming out' of the shadows: Read more...

Published in the CovNews

Where are our J-1 Participants?

Ever wonder if there are other J-1 Trainees and Interns in your area? This map shows which states have exchange visitors. If you would like to go one step further and connect with other participants in your state, just go to our Facebook page and start a discussion!

 

Sheriff Baca may defy proposed law easing immigration enforcement

Published on Sat, Aug 25, 2012

Wendy Sefsaf of the IPC was quoted in an LA Times article about L.A. County Sheriff Baca and California's Trust Act:

"This is one more fight between the federal government and local government because we continue to not solve the greater problem," said Wendy Sefsaf, communications director for the Immigration Policy Center. Read more...

Published in the Los Angeles Times

Entrepreneurship and Economic Policy Fellowship

The Immigration Policy Center, (IPC) a division of the American Immigration Council is seeking applications for a two-year fellowship that will focus on the intersection of immigration, entrepreneurship, innovation and economic policy.

This fellowship will initially focus on two key challenges that face America in its development of a 21st century immigration policy:

  1. The importance of devising policies that permit American companies to competitively recruit and retain the best and brightest from around the world, and
  2. The growing importance of immigrant entrepreneurship in reviving economies and rebuilding communities throughout America.

In keeping with the IPC philosophy of active engagement in the immigration policy debate, the fellow would be expected to conduct original research, as well as build a network of academics and business people who can provide actual examples of immigrant innovation, growth, and entrepreneurship that make the contributions of immigrants real to the public. In addition to independent research products, the fellow will produce fact sheets, blog posts, and other materials that provide our target audiences with the tools they need to engage in a well-informed and rational discussion of immigration policy.Read more...

AIC Executive Director Ben Johnson in the New York Times

Published on Tue, May 21, 2013

The AIC's Executive Director, Ben Johnson, was quoted in an article in the New York Times.  The article, titled "Veteran Senator Emerges as Player on Immigration Overhaul," focuses on Senator Orrin Hatch's role in the Senate Judiciary Committee's mark-up of the immigration bill.

"Though he backed away from immigration reform when he faced a tough primary challenge in 2012, many immigration advocates believe he is now ready to come around to their side.

“I think there is the political space now for Senator Hatch to talk about these issues that he has a track record of being supportive of,” said Ben Johnson, the executive director of the American Immigration Council."

Published in the New York Times

Flora Singer

Retired Teacher and

Scholar of the Montgomery County Public Schools

Ms. Flora Singer was born in Antwerp, Belgium in 1930 and came to the United States at the age of 16. Hers is a compelling story of her own courage and the courage of others who assisted her in evading Hitler's deadly plan for the Jews of Europe during World War II. Ms. Singer and her siblings were separated in Belgium shortly after the beginning of the war. Her father escaped to the U.S. and served in the U.S. Army. Ms. Singer and her two sisters were protected from annihilation in the concentration camps by a Benedictine monk, Father Bruno Reynders. He hid Ms. Singer and her sisters and placed them in convents where they were looked after for two years before they came to the United States with their mother to be finally reunited with their father.

Ms. Singer began her life in the United States in New York City. While living in cramped conditions and sharing one bathroom with four other families in the apartment building, she learned to read and write in English on her own at the public library. She supplemented the family income by sewing in a workshop at first, but then began to study stenography and obtained employment as a secretary and did translations. It was not until the age of 27 that she decided to resume her formal education and received her G.E.D. at Temple University in Philadelphia.

After marrying Jack Singer and having two children, Ms. Singer decided to return to school and earn her college degree. She attended the University of Maryland, College Park and received a Bachelor of Arts degree, Magna Cum Laude, in French and a Master of Arts degree, also in French. She was invited to complete the Ph.D. program at the University of Maryland as well as at Catholic University but did not accept either offer.Read more...

AIC's Ben Johnson Featured in the South Florida Sun-Sentinel

Published on Wed, Oct 16, 2013

Ben Johnson, the Executive Director of the American Immigration Council, was recently published in the South Florida Sun Sentinel in an article titled, "Costs too High Not to Act on US Immigration Reform."  Johnson was making an argument based off of the recent IPC publication, "The Cost of Doing Nothing:  Dollars, Lives, and Opportunities Lost in the Wait for Immigration Reform."

Published in the South Florida Sun-Sentinel

James C. Ho

James C. Ho is currently Solicitor General for the state of Texas. Previously he worked at the Dallas office of Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher LLP. He has previously served as chief counsel of the U.S. Senate Judiciary Subcommittees on the Constitution and Immigration under the chairmanship of Senator John Cornyn (R‐TX) and as a law clerk to Justice Clarence Thomas.

New Americans in the Old Dominion State

Released on Mon, Aug 10, 2009

The Immigration Policy Center (IPC) has compiled research which shows that immigrants, Latinos, and Asians not only wield tremendous political power in Virginia, but are also an integral part of Virginia's economy and tax base. As workers, taxpayers, consumers, and entrepreneurs, immigrants and their children are an economic powerhouse.

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