Skip to Content



2011 "Celebrate America" 3rd Place National Winner

I remembered vividly all of these strangers laughing at me, and I didn't even know what i had done. This flashback included an adult, tall and stern, frown at what I had siad.  Before I knew it, my mother was gazing sorrowfully at me, with another look in her eyes that I couldn't identify.  I wondered what I had done to pain my beloved mother so much. In this strange, stern, new world, I knew nothing.

Coming from my world full of color,  I was unused to this bland, stale country.  But then my world collapsed, creating new horrid memories.  My family had escaped our nor unfamiliar home and immigrated to American, the free country.  Still, many people in this unfriendly people were hostile.  The immigration officers, teachers, police, all of them acted as if they didn't want us here.  I wished that my home still existed, so there would actually be something to call home.

But as I sat alone, thinking, I wondered what would have happened if I stayed.  Bombing, fires, they were all still fresh in my mind.  I knew that I would have lost everything there, but was this place any better?  I have to start all over from nothing.  Not even this new language.  I finally uinderstood what the emotion was in my mother's eyes.  Pity.  She was pitying me for not knowing what I had been through, what I had done wrong.Read more...

Fox Champions Discriminatory Bill That Would Leave Domestic Abuse Victims Unprotected

Published on Wed, May 16, 2012

An IPC report on the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) was cited in a Media Matters story:

Immigrants Are Highly Vulnerable To Domestic And Sexual Violence. From the Immigration Policy Center:Read more...

Published in the Media Matters

The Border: A Resource Page

As money is poured into border enforcement, it is critical that lawmakers consider the facts. The following resources provide key answers to basic questions about the U.S.-Mexico Border and the issues that surround it--from the fiscal implications of policies to the struggle to fight drug cartels.Read more...

Seeking Deferred Action, Young Immigrants With Blemished Records Give Pause

Published on Wed, Aug 29, 2012

IPC Staff Attorney Ben Winograd was quoted in today's WNYC article about the hesitation that some immigrants may feel when applying for deferred action - especially if they have a previous immigration violation or have used fake social security numbers in the past: Read more...

Published in the WNYC

Gustavo Villageliu

Gustavo Villageliu was appointed to the Board of Immigration Appeals (BIA) as a Board Member in July of 1995. The BIA is the highest administrative body for interpreting and applying immigration laws. Mr. Villageliu came to the United States from Cuba as a refugee in 1962 when he was thirteen years old. He and his family lived in Miami for twelve years, then moved to Iowa, where his parents taught as University professors.

Mr. Villageliu attended law school at the University of Iowa, graduating cum laude in 1977. After serving as Johnson County Attorney Prosecutor Intern in Iowa City, Iowa, he joined the Board of Immigration Appeals as a staff attorney in January, 1978. He received numerous achievement awards for his work specializing in war criminals, investors, and criminal alien cases. In September of 1989 he moved to Miami as an Immigration Judge, where he handled cases of detained Cubans at the Krome detention center. As a BIA Board Member, Mr. Villageliu dissented in the landmark case, Matter of N-J-B. In that February 1997 decision, the BIA held that the service of an Order to Show Cause under prior law terminated the period of physical presence for purposes of applying for suspension of deportation, even though the Order was served before the 1996 Act's effective date. This ruling would have resulted in the deportation of tens of thousands of persons who may have qualified for suspension of deportation under previous law. On July 10, 1997, the Attorney General vacated the Board's decision in that case essentially adopting Mr. Villageliu's opinion. Mr. Villageliu and his wife Carmen live in Falls Church with their three children.

The IPC's Guillermo Cantor on Noticias Mundo Fox

Published on Mon, May 13, 2013

The IPC's Senior Policy Analyst, Guillermo Cantor, was interviewed on the Spanish-language Noticias Mundo Fox.  You can watch his full interview at the link below.


Published in the Noticias Mundo Fox

Jeffrey Kaye

Jeffrey Kaye is a Los Angeles‐based freelance journalist. He has been a longtime contributor to the PBS NewsHour and World Report, the public affairs program of HDNet television. Between 1980 and 1984, Kaye was a reporter and senior producer at KCET‐TV (PBS) in Los Angeles. Previously, he worked as a magazine writer, a freelance reporter for National Public Radio, a TV producer, and as a special correspondent for the Washington Post and other publications.


IPC Cited in Chicago Sun-Times Op-Ed

Published on Thu, Oct 31, 2013

In a recent op-ed in the Chicago Sun-Times titled "How Immigration Reform Would Help Chicago," Stephen Bouman cited the Immigration Policy Center while making the case for the economic benefits of passing immigration reform:

"The Immigration Policy Center’s researchers find that Latino and Asian entrepreneurs and consumers already add tens of billions of dollars and tens of thousands of jobs to Illinois’s economy. Imagine how Chicago’s economy could buzz if all immigrants were buying homes, investing in education, and planning for secure futures."

Published in the Chicago Sun-Times

Yearly Accomplishments


  1. Obtained the release of key documents regarding H-1B fraud investigations by USCIS and DHS.
  2. Published new practice advisories that offer strategic insight and advice on timely issues so that immigration attorneys may better represent their clients.
  3. Taught hundreds of 5th graders about immigration through our annual "Celebrate America" Creative Writing Contest.
  4. Guided over 200 high school students as they explored immigration issues on their own communities as they design service-learning projects.
  5. Provided much needed resources that educators and parents can use to introduce their children to the world of immigration.
  6. Launched a nationwide youth multi-media contest that focused on celebrating America as a nation of immigrants.
  7. Produced several events around the country lifting up exceptional immigrants who have made an extraordinary contributions to our country.
  8. Organized a series of timely, informative teleconferences on prosecutorial discretion and administrative advocacy.
  9. Created special reports, blogs and other documents geared toward education policy makers and the public ensuring the immigration debate is based on facts nor fear.
  10. Launched new program initiatives to investigate the benefits of the on-going relationships instituted by intercultural exchange.
  11. Expanded and improved the work of our International Exchange Center, one of the most respected programs in the country.


Legal Fellow Patrick Taurel Quoted on Need for Permanent Immigration Solutions

Published on Mon, Dec 01, 2014

Patrick Taurel, Legal Fellow at the American Immigration Council, was recently quoted in the Washington Post article "Obama’s 2012 DACA move offers a window into pros and cons of executive action."

The article discusses the successful Deferred Action for Childhood Arrrivals (DACA) program, the lessons learned from it, and the need for Congress to pass comprehensive immigration reform.

“We know it [DACA] has made a tremendous beneficial impact in the lives of hundreds of thousands of people,’’ said Patrick Taurel, a legal fellow at the American Immigration Council, a pro-immigration group. “But it’s not enough. We ultimately need Congress to step in and create a permanent solution.’’

Published in the Washington Post