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2008 Winner, Cameron Busby

 

“America is a Refuge”

By Cameron Busby

Tuscon, Arizona

 

 A small child holds out a hoping hand,

a crumb of bread,

or even a penny just to be fed

Hoping America is a refuge.

 

A child weeps over her mother's lifeless body,

the tears streaming down her face

Praying America is a refuge.

 

A child's torn sock blows in the wind,

as a bomb explodes the tiny sock catches a flame and begins to

burn to ash

Can America be a refuge?

 

A thirsty father and son seeking shade from the blazing sun,

all they want is a job

and for America to be a refuge.

 

America can be a refuge for you.

It can be a refuge for me.

I am glad that America is a refuge for all.

 

Immigration reform may spur economic growth, U.S. Chamber says

Published on Thu, Jan 26, 2012

The U.S. Chamber of Commerce released a report Wednesday urging Congress to make the immigration system more "entrepreneur friendly."

Because of U.S. policies that make it difficult for immigrant entrepreneurs to make a home in the states, many are "voting with their feet" and returning to their home nations, according to a joint report from the chamber and the Immigration Policy Center of the American Immigration Council. The report suggests permitting foreign students to remain in the United States after graduation and creating a separate visa for potential entrepreneurs.

Immigrant entrepreneurs are responsible for establishing 18 percent of all Fortune 500 companies and 25.3 percent of all science and technology firms in the United States, including giants like Yahoo! and Google, according to the report.

"We should allow the world's most creative entrepreneurs to stay in our country," said Thomas J. Donehue, CEO of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, in a speech earlier this month. "They are going to contribute and succeed somewhere — why shouldn't it be in the United States?"

Immigrants are more likely than native citizens to start their own businesses, according to the report. Five percent of naturalized citizens are self employed compared to just 3.7 percent of native-born Americans.

During his third State of the Union address Tuesday, President Barack Obama cited immigration reform as one of three important keys to boosting the nation's economy.Read more...

Published in the Deseret News

Quick Tips

Undocumented Workers in Georgia Prepare to File Taxes

Published on Mon, Apr 16, 2012

Midnight on Tuesday is the deadline for filing your state and federal income taxes and a portion of Georgia’s taxpayers are undocumented workers.

It’s hard to say exactly how many of the state’s workers are illegal.

Workers who don’t have social security numbers can still file a tax return, using a nine-digit Individual Taxpayer Identification Number, or I-TIN. The Georgia Department of Revenue doesn’t know how many people with ITINs are here illegally. But the Immigration Policy Center says in 2010, undocumented workers in Georgia paid more than $85,000,000 in income taxes.

Grace Williams is an Atlanta accountant who filed some of those returns. She says there are two reasons why undocumented workers file tax returns. Some want a refund. But Wilson says those who owe hope paying their taxes will lead to bigger things.

“A lot of people in the community are telling them that that’s the responsible thing to do,” Williams says, “And if they aspire to become legal one day, the first thing that they’re going to look at is, ‘Did you do your taxes?” she says.

Williams says those workers hope to become U.S. citizens. But DA King, president of the Dustin Inman Society, which advocates enforcement of immigration laws, says that’s not the real motivation.

“They are getting a refund on the Additional Child Tax Credit,” King says, “Refund is not the right word. They’re getting a rebate from the government for having U.S.-born children,” he says.

King calls the segment of undocumented workers who pay taxes “microscopic.” He points to the Center for Immigration Studies. The group doesn’t have Georgia-specific numbers, but nationally, they say illegal immigrants who file tax returns receive billions more in refunds than they pay in taxes.

So, what’s next? It’s hard to say. Immigrants’ rights groups advocate a path to citizenship, while opponents want tougher enforcement.Read more...

Published in the 90.1 WABE Atlanta

2012 Creative Writing Contest 1st Place Winner

 

America, The Magical Land

By: Alexander Tymouch

Chicago, IL

 

There is a magical place in this world,

Where people come to look for freedom and happiness.

They sail for weeks through the swaying ocean,

When they finally arrive at the mesmerizing new land,

They try to keep their own ways at first.

They celebrate the same holidays,

Wear the same clothes,

And eat the same food.

They do everything the same as before,

But eventually…

They start to learn from one another

And exchange their cultures.

It’s like an experienced cook came and learned to dance,

While a graceful dancer came and learned to sew.

A talented tailor came and learned to bake,

While a baker came and learned to farm.

They thought they were doing it for their own benefit,

But in fact they were making history.

These people learned different cultures

And shared their own cultures too.

And while they were as different as they could be,

They became friends more quickly

By teaching one another

And learning from one another.

And just like that, a new country was born.

But what is truly unbelievable,

Is the fact that this was all created

By ordinary families of immigrants

In that same beautiful, magical place,Read more...

How the President's Deferred Action Initiative Will Help the U.S. Economy

Published on Fri, Jun 29, 2012

IPC head researcher Walter Ewing wrote a blog post for New American Media about the economic benefit of the Obama administration's deferred action program: Read more...

Published in the New American Media

Philip Anderson

President of the American Bar Association

Philip S. Anderson, a partner in the Little Rock law firm of Williams & Anderson, is the third President of the American Bar Association from Arkansas. His advocacy on behalf of immigrants' rights reflects Mr. Anderson's long history of service to the bar and to the public. Prior to election as ABA President, he served as Chair of the ABA House of Delegates, the Association's policy-making body, and as Chair of the ABA Coalition for Justice, which oversees the ABA's justice initiatives program to encourage judges and lawyers to involve the community in improving state and local justice systems.

Mr. Anderson served by Presidential appointment on the U.S. Circuit Judge Nominating Commission Panel for the Eighth Circuit in 1978 and 1979 and was a member of the Federal Advisory Committee for the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eighth Circuit from 1983 until 1988. He is a Trustee of the Southwestern Legal Foundation and is involved with other public service organizations.Read more...

Council Announces Winners of the "Change in Motion" Multimedia Contest

Published on Fri, Feb 01, 2013

The American Immigration Council is pleased to announce the winners of the inaugural 2012 “Change in Motion” Multimedia Contest. The competition challenges young adults to explore the role that immigration plays in their lives and communities.  The program allows young filmmakers and artists to create projects which focus on celebrating America as a nation of immigrants and explore the impact immigration has on our everyday lives.   The contest is sponsored, in part, by the American Immigration Lawyers Association.

Published in the

Marcia Drew Hohn, Ed.D.

Marcia Drew Hohn, Ed.D. is Director of Public Education at The Immigrant Learning Center. Prior to joining The ILC, Marcia was the director of Northeast SABES (System for Adult Basic Education Support).  She holds a doctorate in Human and Organizational Systems from Fielding Graduate University and has more than 20 years of experience in adult learning and systems development.  She has published extensively about immigrant entrepreneurship and organizational systems in adult basic education.

 

IPC Cited in the Washington Post

Published on Wed, Aug 07, 2013

Vivek Wadhwa, an advocate for reform of America's high-skilled immigration system, cited the IPC in a Washington Post article focusing on DREAMers:

"There are an estimated 1.8 million children in the U.S. who could be classified as “illegal aliens”, according to the Immigration Policy Center. They didn’t knowingly break any laws. Their parents brought them to this country to give them a better future. These “DREAMers” as they are called, grew up as Americans, believing they were entitled to the same rights and freedoms as their friends. But, because they don’t have the proper paperwork, they are forced to live in the shadows of society—as second-class human beings with limits on where they can work and study, and what they can do. Until recently, they would also fear being rounded up in the middle of the night to be deported to a land that they don’t even remember."

Published in the Washington Post