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Immigrant Cycle Familiar To United States

Published on Sat, Jul 03, 2010

"When we look at history, you see that immigration goes up in times of economic prosperity and down when the economy is not doing so well," said Michele Waslin, senior policy analyst with the Washington, D.C.-based Immigration Policy Center. The influx spurred opposition from many citizens, who said Irish immigrants were taking Americans' jobs and opposed the immigrants' religion. Politicians demanded laws to make it harder for foreigners to become U.S. citizens.

In 1875, the U.S. passed its first restrictive immigration law. It prevented prostitutes and convicts from entering the country.

"Throughout history, it is the laws that really define who is legal and who is illegal," Waslin said. "At different parts of U.S. history, different groups have been illegal depending on what law there was at the time."

Published in the Arizona Republic

Special Immigrant Religious Workers

This practice advisory addresses the term “religious occupation,” as it is used with respect to certain categories of religious workers. It also addresses federal courts cases overturning AAO decisions that erroneously imposed heightened requirements for “religious occupation.”

Published On: Wednesday, September 29, 2004 | Download File

Appreciating America's Heritage: 2005 Edition

The American Immigration Law Foundation (AILF) is pleased to present this 2005 edition of its 'Appreciating America’s Heritage" teacher resource guide.In these pages educators will find the latest lesson plans and book reviews developed by AILF for primary, intermediate, and secondary level classrooms. Each curriculum is designed and books have been selected to introduce students, especially those who may not be exposed directly to ethnically diverse populations, to the important and timely topic of immigration.

View the 2005 "Appreciating America's Heritage" Teacher Resource Guide

Arizona Sheriff Not Relenting After Court Ruling

Published on Fri, Jul 30, 2010

"Sheriff Joe Arpaio and some other folks there decided they can make a name for themselves in terms of the intensity of the efforts they're using," said Benjamin Johnson, executive director of the pro-immigrant American Immigration Council. "There's no way to deny that. There are a lot of people getting caught up in these efforts."

Published in the CBS News

Requesting Attorneys' Fees Under the Equal Access to Justice Act

Litigants who are successful in their federal court cases against the government may be able to recover attorneys’ fees and costs under the Equal Access to Justice Act (EAJA).  The American Immigration Council and National Immigration Project have reissued their practice advisory on EAJA.  The advisory discusses the statutory requirements for eligibility and other procedural and substantive aspects of filing an EAJA fee application.

Published On: Tuesday, June 17, 2014 | Download File

Deferred Action Q&A

Do you have questions about deferred action.  Use this resource from NILC before applying.  Please seek the advice of an immigration attorney should you have ANY questions go to to find an immigration attorney http://www.ailalawyer.com/.  Beware of scam artists and any body who promises fast processing or guaranteed acceptance.

Year Released: 2012

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What the Drop in Illegal Residency Means for Immigration Reform

Published on Fri, Sep 03, 2010

But Mary Giovagnoli, director of the more liberal Immigration Policy Institute, sees the Pew study as extra motivation to pass comprehensive immigration reform, including a legalization program for those already in the country. "I think it overall provides us with a healthy reality check on the fact that despite the claims that the country's being overrun and that all of these problems are the result of illegal immigrants, the amount of illegal immigration is, in proportion to the overall population and even in terms of overall numbers, declining," she says. "We need to seize upon that and build a smart immigration overhaul where now, with these statistics in play, we can figure out how to get it right."

The number of illegal immigrants has historically vacillated alongside the country's economic fortunes, Giovagnoli points out. "One of the overall best ways to ensure that we don't have continued loops of illegal immigration is to ensure that we have a combination of improvements to our permanent legal system and to our guest worker programs," she says. "We know that enforcement alone can't handle the situation."

Published in the Atlantic Monthly

The Next Arizona

Published on Thu, Oct 28, 2010

After Arizona passed its crackdown law on illegal immigration, SB 1070, politicians across the country said they planned to introduce similar legislation in their states — even after the Justice Department sued Arizona for overstepping its authority to police immigration. Via Immigration Impact, pro-immigration business coalition Immigration Works USA released a report on which states are most likely to go through with their plans. Based on past enforcement policies and Republican support, four states were deemed likely to pass copycat laws: Georgia, Mississippi, Oklahoma and South Carolina.

Published in the The Washington Independent