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ANNOUNCEMENT: The AILA/AIC India Tour (November 2013)

JOIN THE AILA/AIC INDIA TOUR!
(November 9/11 - 21, 2013)

The American Immigration Council's International Exchange Center is co-sponsoring a once in a lifetime opportunity for cultural exchange in India. AILA and AIC have partnered to develop a program that combines international exchange with visits to the three main U.S. consulates that handle visa applications for your India-based clients. Learn about the unique issues and sensitivities in the various regions; network with business groups and professionals; and meet with U.S. consular officials.

Space is filling quickly, so REGISTER TODAY!

Contact Jai Misra at jmisra@immcouncil.org to obtain the registration packet with trip details and cost information.Read more...

Quick Fact: Immigrants make up the majority of computer science students

Two-thirds of electrical engineering and computer science graduate students at U.S. colleges are foreign nationals

American Heritage Dictionary adds 'offensive' to 'anchor baby'

Published on Tue, Dec 06, 2011

The American Heritage Dictionary has added "offensive" to the definition of "anchor baby" in the dictionary after criticism from Latino groups.

Immigrationimpact.com, a project of the nonprofit American Immigration Council, questioned the inclusion of the "anchor baby" definition. On their website, they describe the new definition as "one that was crafted to reflect more accurately just how artificial a term it really is."

The online version of the American Heritage Dictionary now defines "anchor baby" as:

"Offensive Used as a disparaging term for a child born to a noncitizen mother in a country that grants automatic citizenship to children born on its soil, especially when the child's birthplace is thought to have been chosen in order to improve the mother's or other relatives' chances of securing eventual citizenship..."

In January, lawmakers in Washington pushed to change the law so babies born to illegal immigrants could no longer be given automatic citizenship.

Former Arizona state Sen. Russell Pearce paved the way for Arizona's controversial immigration enforcement law supported the legislation in a bill he proposed in 2010.

In May, when CBS 5 Investigates showed Pearce an email referring to "anchor babies" that he forwarded, he said he didn't find anything wrong with the language.

"It's somebody's opinion … What they're trying to say is it's wrong, and I agree with them. It's wrong," said Pearce.

Published in the KPHO Phoenix

American Immigration Council Jobs

WORK WITH THE AMERICAN IMMIGRATION COUNCIL!

FULL TIME STAFF:

FELLOWSHIPS:

  • The American Immigration Council’s Legal Department hires legal fellows on an as-needed basis. The Legal Department collaborates with students applying for fellowship funding. In order to be considered for a fellowship with us, individuals must either be a current law school student or a law school graduate and must be a strong researcher and writer. If interested in a fellowship, please e-mail a cover letter and resume to clearinghouse@immcouncil.org.

INTERNSHIPS:

VOLUNTEER:

There are many ways that you can get involved with the American Immigration Council. Please contact teacher@immcouncil.org for more information.

Immigrant advocates: ‘Attrition through enforcement’ immigration policy already a reality

Published on Tue, Feb 07, 2012

 

Immigration advocates said Monday that an “attrition through enforcement” immigration strategy is nothing new, and already interferes with the daily lives of undocumented and their families, including U.S.-born children.

The term “attrition through enforcement” was first used by immigration restrictionists in 2003 and implemented in 2005, Michelle Waslin of the Immigration Policy Center said on a conference call Monday. Waslin added that immigration restrictionist organizations like the Federation for American Immigration Reform, the Center for Immigration Studies and Numbers USA have sought to market the strategy by arguing it would prove less expensive and more reasonable than mass deportation.

Waslin said the strategy would force undocumented immigrants to leave, regardless of how long they have been in the U.S. and how this impacts U.S.-born children. She added that citizens will pay more in taxes to implement the strategy, which also impacts businesses.

Jonathan Blazer of the American Civil Liberties Union said during the call that “states have served as major laboratories of experimentation for [immigration] restrictionists who seek to push the bills farther and farther.”

He added that because language in state bills is copied word for word and introduced simultaneously, the movement is “a nationally coordinated effort through” groups like the Federation for American Immigration Reform, known as FAIR, the Immigration Reform Law Institute, State Legislators for Legal Immigration and the American Legislative Exchange Council.

Three Florida state representatives are current members of State Legislators for Legal Immigration, including Rep. Gayle Harrell, R-Port St. Lucie, who filed a bill in the current legislative session that would mandate the use of an employment authorization program known as E-Verify.Read more...

Published in the The Florida Independent

Rounding up reactions to the Supreme Court hearing on Arizona immigration crackdown

Published on Thu, Apr 26, 2012

The Supreme Court of the United States, which heard arguments in the lawsuit against Arizona’s immigration enforcement law Wednesday, will not issue its decision until June, but opponents and supporters continue to argue the merits of the state’s crackdown.

The court heard arguments on the legality of only four provisions contained in the Arizona law, known as S.B. 1070. Analysts on both side of this issue say the court’s eventual decision will affect the future of immigration laws across the U.S. Read more...

Published in the The Florida Independent

The LAC Docket | Volume I, Issue 4

The Newsletter of the American Immigration Council’s Legal Action Center

September 8, 2011
Our Work | Requests for Evidence | Quick Links | Donate

OUR WORK

Access to Courts

Circuit courts continue to target departure bar on motions to reopen
Prestol Espinal v. Attorney General
, --- F.3d --- (3d Cir. 2011)
Contreras-Bocanegra v. Holder
, No. 10-9500 (10th Cir. rehearing en banc granted Aug. 2, 2011)

In August, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit became the latest federal court to reject the government’s efforts to prevent noncitizens outside the United States from having their cases reopened or reconsidered. In a unanimous ruling, the court held that the regulations underlying the “departure bar” violate the plain text of the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA), which sets deadlines for filing motions to reopen or reconsider but says nothing to limit such rights for noncitizens already outside the country.Read more...

65,000 Bay Area immigrants could benefit from deportation policy, study states

Published on Sun, Aug 05, 2012

IPC's own Wendy Sefsaf was quoted in a Mercury News article about DREAMers living in the Bay Area.  In that area alone, there are about 65,000 immigrants who could benefit from Obama's new deportation policy coming into effect August 15, 2012.  But the Bay Area isn't the only region of the country with hopeful DREAMers:  Read more...

Published in the Mercury News

Dr. Nadia Krupnikova

Nadia Krupnikova was born in Moscow, Russia and immigrated to Columbia, MO when she was 14 years old. As with many Soviet Jews, Nadia's family came to escape religious and political persecution of the Soviet Russia. They left Russia with ninety dollars and two suitcases per person, feeling lucky to have escaped as opportunities began to close. Along with her mother, Nadia worked odds jobs, including cleaning homes, looking after children and alterations to help support the family. At 18, she entered medical school in Kansas City, MO, with the intention of becoming a psychiatrist. Through the plethora of scholarships, grants and loans this dream was realized after she completed her residency at George Washington University in Washington, DC. Upon graduation she became director of inpatient psychiatry at GW, where she worked and taught until 1997. While there, she also co-authored a behavioral science review book.

From then until 2000, she worked at the world-renowned Chestnut Lodge Hospital in Rockville, MD, that was founded on psychiatric principles that Nadia respected. Nadia wanted to work with severely ill patients who required hospitalization. Certainly, medications were used in treatment of the mentally ill, but Chestnut Lodge advocated a very humanistic approach that paralleled Nadia's view. It was a "labor-intensive" psycho-therapy which required intensive patient-therapist interaction. The world fame of Chestnut Lodge was well deserved, and Nadia thrived while practicing medicine there. With the closure of Chestnut Lodge, Nadia began a private practice in Rockville treating patients who are often severely mentally ill.Read more...