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March 2010 Snapshot

This March the International Exchange Center staff approved trainees and interns who will soon begin unique and interesting J-1 training and internship programs in marketing, industrial design, communications, and many other fields. Training and internship plans continue to reflect a shift in the US economy toward greater efficiency and changes in communications technology.


Our new J-1 exchange visitors are from every corner of the globe: Argentina, Uruguay, Colombia, Canada, New Zealand, Japan, South Korea, China, Russia, India, Iran, South Africa, Morocco, Italy, Switzerland, France, Germany, Belgium, Denmark, Poland, and the United Kingdom.



 


 

Other states eye SB 1070 proceedings

Published on Wed, Apr 25, 2012

Two years after Arizona passed a controversial immigration-enforcement law that, among other things, makes it a state crime to be in the country illegally, the U.S. Supreme Court will hear arguments Wednesday for and against the law. Several other states, including Texas, that have passed — or have attempted to pass — similar legislation are certain to keep a close eye on the proceedings.

Analysts say that a decision will probably be rendered in June, which would leave ample time for lawmakers in Texas to mull over if or how they would attempt to write legislation aimed at curbing illegal immigration before the next legislative session convenes in January. Several dozen bills — including measures making it a state crime to knowingly hire an illegal immigrant (except those hired for domestic services) and broadening the immigration-enforcement authority of local law enforcement — were filed during the 2011 session. But none passed.

Read more...

Published in the Tucson Sentinel

Access to Courts

Access to Courts Federal court review is an important check on agency decision making because of the high stakes involved in immigration cases and the potential for error that accompanies the growing volume of cases. Through targeted litigation, the LAC has consistently advocated that statutory limits on judicial review must be narrowly construed. We also provide practice advisories, mentoring and other support to attorneys seeking review of unfavorable decisions impacting the rights of noncitizens. In addition, we advocate for the adoption of policies that help ensure all noncitizens a meaningful opportunity to be heard in the immigration court system.

Federal Courts | Immigration Courts and the BIA | Practice AdvisoriesRead more...

Meet the immigrant Olympians

Published on Mon, Jul 30, 2012

IPC's Immigration Impact blog was referred to by Southern California Public Radio's Leslie Berestein Rojas in her own blog about immigration and cultural fusion in Southern California.  The article gives tribute to the diverse US athletes participating in this year's exciting Olympic Games: Read more...

Published in the Southern California Public Radio: Multi-American

Supreme Court Case involving Arizona: A Resource Guide

Two Systems of Justice Paper Highlighted in Voxxi and the Huffington Post

Published on Thu, Mar 21, 2013

The IPC and LAC's Special Report, "Two Systems of Justice:  How the Immigration System Falls Short of American Ideals of Justice," was highlighted in a piece by Voxxi, which was then reposted by the Huffington Post:

"The United States’ justice system is supposed to operate equally for all defendants, but a new report reveals that the immigration system operates under a different set of rules for immigrants facing deportation.

The American Immigration Council issued on Tuesday a report that reveals the immigration system fails to provide “a fair process” to immigrants in removal proceedings and “lacks nearly all of the procedural safeguards we rely on and value in the U.S. justice system.” The report, titled “Two Systems of Justice: How the Immigration System Falls Short of the Ideals of Justice”, also explores the major operational differences between the criminal justice system and the immigration removal system."

You can read the full report here.

Published in the Voxxi

David Bartlett, Ph.D.

David Bartlett, Ph.D., who has a Ph.D. in political science from the University of California, San Diego, is president of the Global Economics Company in Minneapolis, Minnesota, and Adjunct Professor of Strategic Management and Organization at the Carlson School of Management, University of Minnesota. His book, The Political Economy of Dual Transformations: Market Reform and Democratization, won the 1998 Hewett Prize from the American Association for the Advancement of Slavic Studies.Read more...

The IPC's Guillermo Cantor Featured in Aging Today

Published on Wed, Aug 28, 2013

Guillermo Cantor, the Senior Policy Analyst at the Immigration Policy Center, was published in Aging Today in an article titled, "Will Immigration Reform Address Our Need for Eldercare Workers?"

In it, Cantor writes:

"The implications of S. 744 are manifold. First, by offering a path to citizenship for undocumented workers currently living in the country, the bill would certainly help stabilize the direct care workforce, which would in turn improve the quality of care. In particular, as a 2011 report by the National Council on Aging (NCOA) and the National Hispanic Council on Aging (NHCOA) has shown, once unauthorized care workers become legalized, they can legally drive, undergo enhanced background checks and access better opportunities for training and career advancement.

While the legalization of undocumented workers constitutes a significant step forward in strengthening the direct care workforce of current undocumented workers, the bill’s implications for the future flow of immigrant care workers must also be considered. Several signs suggest that the new legal immigration system created by S. 744 falls short of providing a sustainable solution to the eldercare shortage."

Published in the Aging Today

Stewart J. Lawrence

Stewart J. Lawrence is a veteran news journalist and public policy analyst who writes frequently on immigration and Latino affairs. In recent years, his commentaries have appeared in The Los Angeles Times, Christian Science Monitor, Politico, the Guardian, and The World and I. He is also founder and managing director of Puentes & Associates, Inc., a bilingual survey research and communications firm.

 

New York Times Highlights Council Report as "A Blueprint For Action"

Published on Sun, May 11, 2014

The New York Times published an editorial calling for more transparency within Customs and Border Protection based on the Immigration Policy Center's report "No Action Taken: Lack of CBP Accountability in Responding to Complaints of Abuse".

The editorial stated: "If a Border Patrol agent beats, kicks, threatens or otherwise abuses you, you can file a complaint. What you can’t count on, evidently, is anything being done about it.

That is the sorry conclusion of a study released last week by the American Immigration Council, an advocacy organization in Washington. The council sought to collect data about abuse complaints against the Border Patrol — a difficult task, given the lack of transparency at Customs and Border Protection, the agency within the Department of Homeland Security to which the Border Patrol belongs.

The council had to sue under the Freedom of Information Act to obtain records of 809 complaints between January 2009 and January 2012. The accusations varied widely — of migrants kicked and stomped after being detained, struck in the face and head with flashlights and other objects, sexually groped, improperly strip-searched, verbally abused."

Published in the New York Times