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American Immigration Council Store

All proceeds from the purchase of books go to the American Immigration Council and its educational initiatives. Scroll down to check out our inventory of signed copies of immigration related books.

Price: $20

 

Davy Brown Discovers His Roots

By Keely Alexander and Velani Mynhardt

The American Immigration Council partnered with authors Velani Mynhardt Witthöft and Keely Alexander of Keely Velani LLC and created Davy Brown Discovers His Roots. The colorfully illustrated book tells the story of a young boy and his friends as they discover that everybody has an immigration story, whether their families arrived today or generations ago. The story, which is aimed toward 7-12 year olds, is a great way to introduce the concept of the many ways people come to the United States permanently and temporarily. It is a perfect conversation starter for a family discovering their roots or for a classroom teacher starting a unit on immigration.

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Backlash against Kris Kobach on immigration is growing

Published on Thu, Feb 09, 2012

Kris Kobach’s ears should be burning.

Backlash built this week against the Kansas secretary of state for gallivanting state-to-state, drumming up support for laws bent on driving illegal immigrants out.

The rebukes aren’t coming from his usual critics, those who display sanity about the federal reforms needed to effectively deal with illegal immigration.

No, Kobach’s supporters are barking back now. The legislators and taxpayers who bought into his schemes to make the lives of illegal immigrants so hellish that they “self-deport.”

The editorial board of the Press-Register in Mobile, Ala., accused Kobach of banking on exactly what happened there — costly court challenges and a wide-range of unintended consequences for legal residents.

“Alabama allowed itself to be used as a guinea pig on illegal immigration so that a Kansas lawyer could build his political career,” the editorial said.

So Alabama’s legislature has gone to work, figuring out how to rewrite or repeal the damage done by Kobach’s handiwork, measures passed in 2011.

On Monday, the Immigration Policy Center released “Discrediting ‘Self Deportation’ As Immigration Policy.” Yes, you can make life harsh for immigrants, but everyone else suffers, too. Economists predict Alabama’s gross domestic product will lose up to $10.8 billion as a result, and $57 million to $264 million more in state income and sales tax collections could evaporate.

Oops.

Anyway, data are beginning to show that immigrants don’t self-deport in substantial numbers.

It’s all sleight of hand, a hustle that eventually will reach the U.S. Supreme Court.

Missouri also stood out in national conversations for being among the gullible states where chasing around illegal immigrants is still gathering traction, despite experiences elsewhere.Read more...

Published in the The Kansas City Star

Mission

About the Immigration Policy Center

The Immigration Policy Center (IPC) is the research and policy arm of the American Immigration Council. IPC's mission is to shape a rational conversation on immigration and immigrant integration. Through its research and analysis, IPC provides policymakers, the media, and the general public with accurate information about the role of immigrants and immigration policy in U.S. society. IPC reports and materials are widely disseminated and relied upon by press and policy makers. IPC staff regularly serves as experts to leaders on Capitol Hill, opinion-makers and the media. IPC, formed in 2003 is a non-partisan organization that neither supports nor opposes any political party or candidate for office.

What We Do

Contributing Research

The IPC researches important issues related to immigration (such as the impact of immigration on the economy, jobs and crime). Our work is geared toward providing a solid, fact-based foundation for the immigration debate.

Bridging the Gap

The IPC's work helps to bridge the gap between advocates and academics, policy experts and politicians. Through forums, briefings and special publications, we bring diverse groups together to help shape the immigration debate.

Getting the Facts

All too often, the debate about immigration is dominated by fear and misinformation. IPC works to make sure that fact is separated from fiction. To do this, we monitor and rapidly respond to statements made by anti-immigration groups, providing lawmakers, the media and the general public with accurate, up-to-date information.Read more...

Letter to the Editor: Where Arizona’s immigration law is flawed

Published on Sun, Apr 29, 2012

Despite the Supreme Court justices’ apparent skepticism [“Justices receptive to parts of Arizona’s immigration law,” front page, April 26], the immigration status checks required by Arizona’s law subvert federal enforcement priorities and procedures. Section 2(B) requires Arizona police to verify the immigration status of all individuals arrested. This will result in thousands of additional verification requests to the federal government every year, significantly delay response times and divert scarce enforcement resources away from high-priority targets.

Section 2(B) also requires that, in the event of a lawful stop or an investigative detention, police check immigration status only if they have “reasonable suspicion” an individual is unlawfully present. Given the cursory nature of such stops, the complexities of federal immigration law and minimal guidance from the state law, police — under threat of civil damages — will be forced to rely on impermissible criteria such as race to make these determinations.

Such an arbitrary and unjust process contradicts the comprehensive enforcement scheme embodied in federal immigration law.

Melissa Crow, North Potomac

Published in the The Washington Post

Matthew Baxter, 1958-2011

Matthew Baxter, Former Council Ambassador, AILA Chapter Chair, Colleague and Friend

On September 15, 2011, Philadelphia AILA member Matthew Baxter passed away from complications of liver disease. He was 53 years old.

Philadelphia’s AILA chapter treasured Matthew as a person who made membership in the association worthwhile. He took on many roles for the Philadelphia Chapter, serving as a Chapter Officer and Chapter Chair, committee chair, mentor, speaker and friend. He was always willing to teach his fellow members, whether at a CLE, on a phone call, or in the hallway outside immigration court. He was deeply involved with education, advocacy and practice support. He served as Chapter Liaison to USCIS and EOIR, working tirelessly on behalf of the Chapter and cooperatively with the agencies to develop solutions to everyday challenges.

He also served two years as Ambassador for the American Immigration Council (AIC), formerly known as AILF. He was a model Ambassador, raising awareness about the organization and its work, touting the accomplishments of the Legal Action Center and Immigration Policy Center, promoting the Creative Writing Contest, attending events as a representative of the AIC and raising money for the organization. His work, his drive and his commitment as an Ambassador helped strengthen the AIC.

Matthew cared deeply about his clients and doing the best job possible for them. His cases were meticulously prepared and elegantly argued. He loved the law and he understood how to use it as a tool for justice.Read more...

DHS Unveils Guidance for Deferred Action for Qualfied Young Illegal Aliens

Published on Mon, Aug 06, 2012

Homeland Security Today cited the IPC's study, "Who And Where the DREAMers Are," in an in-depth article describing the new criteria surrounding Obama's deferred action plan:

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Published in the Homeland Security Today

Justice Alma L. López

Justice Alma L. López was born in Laredo, Texas on August 17, 1943, and was raised and educated in San Antonio, Texas. Justice López was appointed to the Fourth Court by Governor Ann Richards in October 1993, becoming the first Hispanic woman to serve on the Fourth Court of Appeals and the first Hispanic woman to serve as Chief Justice in the State of Texas. She was elected to a full term of six (6) years on November 8, 1994, taking office on January 1, 1995. She was re-elected to a second term in November 2000.

Justice López graduated from St. Mary’s University with a B.B.A. in 1965 and from St. Mary’s Law School with a J.D. in 1968. Justice López practiced law for twenty-five years, twenty of those as a sole practitioner prior to being appointed to the Court.

Justice López is the recipient of many awards including the Award for Outstanding Achievement from the Mexican American Bar Association in 1998. She was inducted into the San Antonio Women’s Hall of Fame for Public Service in 2002 and received the National Association of Women Lawyers President’s Award for Excellence in 2004. She is listed in the Who’s Who Among Outstanding Americans.Read more...

The IPC Cited in the Guardian

Published on Wed, Apr 17, 2013

The IPC was cited in an article discussing Florida Senator Marco Rubio's attempts to promote the new Senate "Group of Eight" immigration bill.  Here's an except:

"'Right now nobody benefits from the status quo,' Rubio told Univision's Jorge Ramos in an interview in Spanish. 'The only people who benefit right now are the criminals abusing the people who cross [the border] and the employers who abuse their workers by paying their workers less.'

Rubio is right but he has to make a stronger case. He should explain that immigrants are not a drain but a net benefit for the United States, if there is a pathway to green cards and citizenship for the 11 million undocumented living in the United States.

What Rubio didn't detail is how the undocumented contribute to the economy by paying taxes. If they are given legal residency and citizenship, they will be able to contribute more over time. According to the Immigration Policy Center, households headed by undocumented immigrants paid a combined $11.2bn in state and local taxes in 2010."

Published in the Guardian

Claudia M. Prado‐Meza

Claudia M. Prado‐Meza is a Ph.D. candidate at Iowa State University, focusing on sustaining rural communities in Mexico and outreach programs for Latino immigrants in Iowa.

IPC Senior Fellow Rob Paral Published in Houston Chronicle

Published on Wed, Sep 11, 2013

Rob Paral, a Senior Fellow at the Immigration Policy Center and the author of our recently published Special Report, "Stepping Up:  The Impact of the Newest Immigrant, Asian, and Latino Voters," made the case in the Houston Chronicle that the long-term demographic shift in many Republican and Democratic districts makes immigration reform even more of an urgent priority:

"A new analysis of immigration trends and demographic composition of U.S. House districts shows that many Republican congressional districts have emerging electorates that care deeply about immigration reform.

"Many Republican representatives will see their constituency profiles evolve in the coming years. Asian and Latino youth and newly naturalized U.S. citizens will make up 34 percent of newly eligible voters in 55 Republican-held congressional districts."

Published in the Houston Chronicle