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New CIS Report on Noncitizen Voters Looks for Problems Where None Exist

Released on Sun, Sep 14, 2008

A new report released by the Center for Immigration Studies (CIS) highlights the issue of localities that permit noncitizens to vote in local elections.

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International Exchange Center Expands!

Released on Thu, Nov 12, 2009

The American Immigration Council’s International Exchange Center is pleased to announce the expansion of the occupational field for which they are designated to sponsor training. The Department of States has extended the International Exchange Center’s programming to include opportunities in: Arts & Culture; Tourism; Social Sciences, Library Science, Non-clinical Counseling, and Social Services.

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The United States v. Arizona: Drawing a Clear Line Between Federal and State Immigration Authority

Released on Tue, Jul 06, 2010

Washington, D.C. - Today, the United States Department of Justice filed a lawsuit against the state of Arizona in federal court. The lawsuit, prompted by passage of SB 1070 in the Arizona legislature, will argue that federal law trumps the state statute and enforcing immigration law is a federal responsibility. The Department has requested a preliminary injunction to delay enactment of the law, arguing that the law's operation will cause "irreparable harm."
 
"The federal government is taking an important step to reassert its authority over immigration policy in the United States," said Benjamin Johnson, Executive Director of the American Immigration Council. "While a legal challenge by the Department of Justice won't resolve the public's frustration with our broken immigration system, it will seek to define and protect the federal government's constitutional authority to manage immigration."
 
Although states have always played a role in federal immigration enforcement, over the last 10 years more and more states have chosen to impose their local policies, priorities, and politics on our national immigration system. America can only have one immigration system, and the federal government must make clear where states' authority begins and where it ends. The federal government must assert its authority to establish a uniform immigration policy that it can be held accountable for. In the current environment it is unclear who is responsible for setting immigration enforcement priorities and who is responsible for their success or failure.Read more...

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Colorado

 

AIC Resources for AILA Colorado Chapter:

Policy Resources       Education Resources     International Exchange Center Resource

  The Council in the News   Practice Advisories       Immigration Impact Blog

 

Your AIC Ambassador: Melanie K. Corrin
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Motion to Reopen Process Provides Aliens With Protections on Par With Habeas Review

Released on Fri, Mar 25, 2011

LAC Deputy Director Beth Werlin is quoted in this Law Week article regarding post departure motions to reopen.

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Board of Immigration Appeals Guts Legal Protections for Immigrants Under Arrest

Released on Mon, Aug 15, 2011

Washington, D.C.—The American Immigration Council strongly condemns last week’s ruling from the Board of Immigration Appeals holding that immigrants arrested without a warrant are not entitled to certain Miranda-like warnings prior to questioning by immigration officers. In a precedent decision, the Board held that noncitizens need not be informed of their right to counsel or warned that their statements can be used against them until after they have been placed in formal deportation proceedings.

For decades, immigrants placed under arrest have been entitled to these critical advisals. Like “Miranda” warnings for criminal suspects, such notifications help to ensure that statements made during questioning are not the product of coercion. As a result of last week’s ruling, noncitizens under arrest will now be even more vulnerable to pressure from interrogating officers, and immigration judges will face greater difficulty determining whether statements made during questioning were truly voluntary.

“This decision epitomizes the substandard system of justice that’s been created and imposed on immigrants in the United States,” said Melissa Crow, Director of the American Immigration Council’s Legal Action Center. “The Board’s ruling renders the advisals practically meaningless and makes immigrants less likely to remain silent when questioned and less likely to assert their right to counsel.”

The Board of Immigration Appeals is the highest administrative tribunal on immigration and nationality matters in the United States. Decisions of the Board may be subject to review by federal courts or by the Attorney General. The ruling came in Matter of E-R-M-F- & A-S-M-, 25 I&N Dec. 580 (BIA 2011).

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