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Immigrant among first in nation to receive temporary reprieve from deportation

Published on Sat, Nov 03, 2012

IPC statistics were used in this AJC article about Christian Jimenez, one of the first immigrants in the U.S. to receive a reprieve from deportation under Obama's new immigration policy:

Nearly 1 million immigrants across the U.S. are now eligible for deferred action, according to an estimate by the Immigration Policy Center, an arm of the American Immigration Council, an immigrant rights and policy group in Washington. Of those, 24,360 live in Georgia, the eighth-largest total among states.

Published in the The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

Philip Anderson

President of the American Bar Association

Philip S. Anderson, a partner in the Little Rock law firm of Williams & Anderson, is the third President of the American Bar Association from Arkansas. His advocacy on behalf of immigrants' rights reflects Mr. Anderson's long history of service to the bar and to the public. Prior to election as ABA President, he served as Chair of the ABA House of Delegates, the Association's policy-making body, and as Chair of the ABA Coalition for Justice, which oversees the ABA's justice initiatives program to encourage judges and lawyers to involve the community in improving state and local justice systems.

Mr. Anderson served by Presidential appointment on the U.S. Circuit Judge Nominating Commission Panel for the Eighth Circuit in 1978 and 1979 and was a member of the Federal Advisory Committee for the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eighth Circuit from 1983 until 1988. He is a Trustee of the Southwestern Legal Foundation and is involved with other public service organizations.Read more...

ABC News-Univision Features IPC's Walter Ewing

Published on Mon, Jul 15, 2013

A recent ABC-Univision article titled "Fact Check:  Is Fear of Immigrant Criminals Overblown?" featured the IPC's Senior Researcher, Walter Ewing.

"'Obviously, dangerous criminals and terrorists must be punished, and immigrants who are dangerous criminals or terrorists should be locked up,' wrote Walter Ewing, a senior researcher at the Immigration Policy Center, in a book devoted to the issue. 'But harsh immigration policies are not effective in fighting crime or terrorism because the overwhelming majority of immigrants are neither criminals nor terrorists.'"

Published in the ABC News-Univision

Marcia Drew Hohn, Ed.D.

Marcia Drew Hohn, Ed.D. is Director of Public Education at The Immigrant Learning Center. Prior to joining The ILC, Marcia was the director of Northeast SABES (System for Adult Basic Education Support).  She holds a doctorate in Human and Organizational Systems from Fielding Graduate University and has more than 20 years of experience in adult learning and systems development.  She has published extensively about immigrant entrepreneurship and organizational systems in adult basic education.

 

AIC's Benjamin Johnson Responds to Misleading Deportation Data in Washington Times Report

Published on Tue, Apr 01, 2014

Ben Johnson, the Executive Director of the American Immigration Council, responded to the misleading deportation numbers in a recent Washington Times article titled "68,000 Illegal Aliens with Criminal Records Caught and Released".

"The American Immigration Council, though, said the numbers were 'completely misleading' and that many of those ICE agents encountered were likely kicked out of the country even if they weren’t officially put into deportation proceedings.

The AIC said the more than 720,000 immigrants ICE encountered also likely included many legal immigrants whose 'interaction with law enforcement was so minor that they are not even legally subject to removal.'

'CIS is essentially asserting that a legal-permanent resident or a recently naturalized citizen with a broken tail light should be charged by ICE and removed from the country although there is no basis in law for such action,' said Benjamin JohnsonAIC’s executive director."

Published in the Washington Times

Michael J. Wishnie, Esq.

Michael J. Wishnie, Esq. is the William O. Douglas Clinical Professor of Law and Director of the Jerome N. Frank Legal Services Organization at Yale Law School. Professor Wishnie’s teaching, scholarship, and law practice have focused on immigration, labor and employment, habeas corpus, civil rights, government transparency, and veterans law. This paper is adapted with permission from Wishnie, Proportionality: The Struggle for Balance in U.S. Immigration Policy, 72 U.Pitt.L.Rev.431 (2011) and Wishnie, Immigration Law and the Proportionality Requirement, 2 U.C.Irv.L.Rev.___ (forthcoming 2012).

Latino and Asian Clout in the Voting Booth

Released on Wed, Aug 12, 2009

Immediately after the Presidential election of 2008, it was quickly apparent through exit polling that Latino, Asian, and African-American voting had expanded dramatically compared to the 2004 election. Census Bureau data released late last month confirms the tremendous growth in voting among these groups. Today, the Immigration Policy Center (IPC) releases a fact check, Latino and Asian Clout in the Voting Booth, which shows how much the electoral power of racial and ethnic minorities increased in just four years.

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2013 Immigration Litigation Meeting: Reading Materials

Reading Materials

Thursday, May 30th, 2013

11:30AM - Registration and Lunch

12PM-12:30PM - Opening remarks and introducations

12:30PM - 1:30PM - Legalization Challenges: Lessons Learned from IRCA
Read more...

Leaders in Both Parties Agree Immigration Reform is a Must Pass Priority

Released on Mon, Nov 24, 2008

In recent days, leaders from both sides of the aisle indicated that comprehensive immigration reform is a legislative priority for the 111th Congress. Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid reassured the public that Congress will move forward and pass immigration reform legislation. Meanwhile, renowned Republican strategist Karl Rove included immigration reform as part of a roadmap for the future survival of the GOP. Read IPC's comments.

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Immigration in Indiana