Skip to Content

Programs:

Legalization

Immigrant advocates: ‘Attrition through enforcement’ immigration policy already a reality

Published on Tue, Feb 07, 2012

 

Immigration advocates said Monday that an “attrition through enforcement” immigration strategy is nothing new, and already interferes with the daily lives of undocumented and their families, including U.S.-born children.

The term “attrition through enforcement” was first used by immigration restrictionists in 2003 and implemented in 2005, Michelle Waslin of the Immigration Policy Center said on a conference call Monday. Waslin added that immigration restrictionist organizations like the Federation for American Immigration Reform, the Center for Immigration Studies and Numbers USA have sought to market the strategy by arguing it would prove less expensive and more reasonable than mass deportation.

Waslin said the strategy would force undocumented immigrants to leave, regardless of how long they have been in the U.S. and how this impacts U.S.-born children. She added that citizens will pay more in taxes to implement the strategy, which also impacts businesses.

Jonathan Blazer of the American Civil Liberties Union said during the call that “states have served as major laboratories of experimentation for [immigration] restrictionists who seek to push the bills farther and farther.”

He added that because language in state bills is copied word for word and introduced simultaneously, the movement is “a nationally coordinated effort through” groups like the Federation for American Immigration Reform, known as FAIR, the Immigration Reform Law Institute, State Legislators for Legal Immigration and the American Legislative Exchange Council.

Three Florida state representatives are current members of State Legislators for Legal Immigration, including Rep. Gayle Harrell, R-Port St. Lucie, who filed a bill in the current legislative session that would mandate the use of an employment authorization program known as E-Verify.Read more...

Published in the The Florida Independent

New Media Internship

The Immigration Policy Center (IPC), the research and policy arm of the American Immigration Council, is seeking a New Media Intern to assist with its online presence and social networking capacity. Applicants should possess strong communications and new media skills, as well as a passion for the future of immigration.

Responsibilities include:

  • Updating IPC website, blog and publications
  • Blog/new media outreach
  • Archiving media clips
  • Generating dialogue in social networking spaces
  • Gathering and maintaining media contact lists (relevant websites, blogs, print, audio and visual media)
  • Integrating new media technologies into IPC's communication strategies
  • Supporting staff as needed

Qualifications and Skills

  • Interest in immigration
  • Basic HTML skills preferred, but not required
  • Understanding of blog culture and new media world
  • Basic Wordpress and blogging skills
  • Familiar with a wide-range of online social networks and new media technologies
  • Strong written and verbal communication skills
  • Strong organizational skills
  • Student working on BS/BA or MS/MA degree in Communication/Journalism/New Media or related field with a strong interest in immigration
  • Sense of humor a must

Compensation
Non-paid, school credit available

Schedule
Flexible, preferably 3-4 days a week

Duration
Five to Six Months

Application Procedure
Application process is rolling. Please send us a resume and cover letter stating your knowledge of and experience with new media—including relevant classes and related work experience.  Your cover letter should also demonstrate your interest in immigration and what you hope to gain from this internship.Read more...

Rounding up reactions to the Supreme Court hearing on Arizona immigration crackdown

Published on Thu, Apr 26, 2012

The Supreme Court of the United States, which heard arguments in the lawsuit against Arizona’s immigration enforcement law Wednesday, will not issue its decision until June, but opponents and supporters continue to argue the merits of the state’s crackdown.

The court heard arguments on the legality of only four provisions contained in the Arizona law, known as S.B. 1070. Analysts on both side of this issue say the court’s eventual decision will affect the future of immigration laws across the U.S. Read more...

Published in the The Florida Independent

Enforcement

Enforcement

The LAC engages in administrative advocacy and targeted litigation to protect the rights of noncitizens facing removal, encourage the favorable exercise of prosecutorial discretion in appropriate cases, promote greater transparency regarding DHS enforcement practices, and ensure that immigration officers are held accountable for misconduct. We also provide practice advisories, mentoring and other support to attorneys representing immigrants arrested in enforcement actions and placed in removal proceedings.Read more...

65,000 Bay Area immigrants could benefit from deportation policy, study states

Published on Sun, Aug 05, 2012

IPC's own Wendy Sefsaf was quoted in a Mercury News article about DREAMers living in the Bay Area.  In that area alone, there are about 65,000 immigrants who could benefit from Obama's new deportation policy coming into effect August 15, 2012.  But the Bay Area isn't the only region of the country with hopeful DREAMers:  Read more...

Published in the Mercury News

Past Honorees

Each year, the American Immigration Council honors American immigrants and their achievements. Our distinguished honorees have come from politics, music, television, sports, education and many other professional fields. Click on each name to learn more about each honoree.

We congratulate our 2014 Honorees:

American Heritage Awards

 joseantoniovargas   Nachito Herrera   T.Emmanuel
   Carlos Arredondo
 Rais Bhuiyan
 Mary Mazzio

 

Immigrant Achievement AwardsRead more...

AIC Executive Director Ben Johnson in the New York Times

Published on Thu, Apr 04, 2013

The AIC's Executive Director, Ben Johnson, was quoted in the New York Times on Thursday.  The article, focusing on the pathway to citizenship expected to be included in the upcoming immigration bill, called on Johnson's expertise on how the process is expected to work:

“There is broad recognition that these folks will have to go through a process of atonement,” said Benjamin E. Johnson, executive director of the American Immigration Council, a group in Washington that works to build support for immigration. “But ultimately at the end of the process they would become full-fledged members of our society through American citizenship.”

Published in the New York Times

Jeanne Batalova, Ph.D.

Jeanne Batalova, Ph.D. is a Policy Analyst at MPI and Manager of the MPI Data Hub, an online resource that provides instant access to the latest facts, stats, and maps covering US and global data on immigration and immigrant integration. Her areas of expertise include the impacts of immigrants on society and labor markets; the integration of immigrant children and elderly immigrants; and the policies and practices regulating immigration of highly skilled workers and foreign students. She earned her PhD in sociology, with a specialization in demography, from the University of California-Irvine; an MBA from Roosevelt University; and bachelor of the arts in economics from the Academy of Economic Studies, Chisinau, Moldova.

IPC Report Featured in VOXXI

Published on Wed, Sep 04, 2013

A recent article on VOXXI featured a recent Special Report created by IPC Fellow Rob Paral, entitled, "Stepping Up:  The Impact of the Newest Immigrant, Latino, and Asian Voters."

The report, which details the future changes the U.S. Congress can expect in terms of voter demographics, was the central focus of the article: 

"The newly released study shows that the electoral composition in congressional districts is on track to change as more naturalized U.S. citizens and young Latinos and Asians — many of whom support immigration reform — become eligible to vote in the next few years.

“Representatives contemplating their eventual vote on immigration reform need to weigh the numerous policy arguments in favor of reform and make an informed decision, but they must also understand the shifting demographic dimensions of their districts,” stated Rob Paral, the author of the study."

Published in the VOXXI

Walter Leutz, Ph.D.

Walter Leutz, Ph.D. is an Associate Professor at the Schneider Institute for Health Policy at Brandeis University's Heller School for Social Policy and Management. He is Director of the Social HMO Consortium, a university-provider cooperative that has developed, expanded, and researched a managed care model for integrating acute and long-term care services for Medicare beneficiaries. His most recent book, Linking Medical Care and Community Services, was published by Springer in 2003. In the 2003-4 academic year he has been on sabbatical studying the new national long-term care insurance programs in Germany and Japan.