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Tribute Donations

Remember those people who are or who have influenced your life by paying tribute to them.  A tribute donation to the American Immigration Council provides a meaningful way to remember or recognize those who have made a significant impact on you, your family or your colleagues.

A tribute donation can be made in honor or in memory of someone.  For each tribute, we will notify the honored individual or family of your special gift, keeping the amount confidential. 

You can make a tribute donation online (be sure to fill out “In Honor or In Memory” portion of the form and complete the dedication information) or by completing this form and mailing it to:

 

 American Immigration Council
c/o Megan Hess
1333 G Street, NW
Suite 200
Washington, DC  20005

 

Or you may fax the form to the attention of Megan Hess at (202) 742-5619.

If you have any questions at all regarding giving a contribution to the American Immigration Council, please contact Megan Hess at (202)507-7517 or mhess@immcouncil.org.

The Fiscal Fallout of State Immigration Laws

Published on Thu, Jun 14, 2012

Time Magazine uses IPC numbers to explain why harsh state immigration laws are bad for the economy: Read more...

Published in the Time Magazine

Resources


Resources for Current J-1 Interns and Trainees

Is the American Immigration Council is currently sponsoring your J-1 Intern or Trainee program? Look here for information on what information you need to send us when you arrive, obtaining a Travel Validation signature, applying for a Social Security number and tax information, and replacement Evaluation forms.


Application Resources

Are you applying to one of the International Exchange Center’s J-1 programs? Click here for information on how to write a DS 7002 Training Plan and instructions on filling out our application.Read more...

Advocacy groups weigh in on 287(g) phase out

Published on Thu, Oct 18, 2012

Senior policy analyst Michele Waslin was quoted in this article ICE's 287(g) program:

"Michele Waslin, a senior policy analyst with the American Immigration Council, said the task force piece of the 287(g) agreements pertains to police officers on the street.

Waslin said the council, a non-profit that aims to educate the public about immigration and promote sensible, humane immigration policies, has always “advocated for the end of the 287(g) program.”

Waslin said that Secure Communities would still identify criminal illegal immigrants, but would probably eliminate some of the issues some people have had about 287(g).

Waslin said that there are people who worry about police officers exceeding their authority and the potential for racial profiling, civil rights violations and discrimination under the program.

“That’s where the criticism has come from, the police stopping people and asking to see papers,” she said."

Published in the Inside NOVA

Ana Sol Gutierrez

Ana Sol Gutiérrez was born Ana Emma Sol Perez in Santa Ana, El Salvador. She was five years old when she first came to the United States when her father, Jorge Sol Castellanos, was named a founding director of the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank. After living in El Salvador, she returned to Maryland to continue her education, graduating high school from Montgomery County Public Schools, and later received a BS in Chemistry from Pennsylvania State University. She also studied abroad at L’Universite de Geneve in Switzerland, where she met and married a Bolivian student, Fernando Gutiérrez. After returning to the U.S. and starting a family, she continued her studies, which led to a MS from American University in Scientific and Technical Information Systems and post-graduate studies in Engineering at the George Washington University.

With over thirty years in the public and private corporate sector, Ms. Sol Gutiérrez has experience working as a systems engineer, and experience with strategic planning, program management and computer engineering. As President and CEO of Sol Quality Systems, Inc., she started a small business providing management and engineering services. Recently, she retired as a senior executive with Computer Sciences Corporation, as Director of Strategic IT Consulting and Quality Management.

Ms. Sol Gutiérrez received a political appointment from President Clinton to the U.S. Department of Transportation, as the Deputy Administrator of the Research and Special Programs Administration (RSPA). She directed the agency’s safety, regulatory, and research and development programs, with oversight of major national transportation safety programs including Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety, Pipeline Safety, and Emergency Response.Read more...

IPC State Fact Sheets Featured in Huffington Post

Published on Mon, Jul 22, 2013

A recent article in the Huffington Post, "Greeley Immigration Reform Rally Focuses On U.S. House Of Representatives, Rep. Cory Gardner," mentioned one of the recent IPC State-by-State Fact Sheets. 

"...More than two dozen people showed up for the event and held signs in support of immigration reform.

'The Immigration Policy Center estimates that Colorado will lose an estimated $8 billion in economic activity if all unauthorized immigrants were to be deported,' Young said. 'When people work for less than the going wages, it undercuts employment and saps the paychecks of every hard working family.'

Published in the Huffington Post

Terry Goddard, Esq.

Terry Goddard, Esq. completed his second and final term as Arizona’s Attorney General in January 2011 and has reentered the private practice of law. A native of Tucson, Arizona and graduate of Harvard College, he was first elected Arizona Attorney General in 2002. Mr. Goddard is currently teaching at Columbia Law School in the Attorney General Project and a graduate course entitled "The Art of Public Decision Making" at Arizona State University School of Public Affairs. He has been selected a Wasserstein Fellow at Harvard Law School and is a Senior Fellow at the American Immigration Council. Terry lives in Phoenix with his wife Monica and teenage son.

AIC's Benjamin Johnson Featured in Fox News Latino

Published on Tue, Apr 01, 2014

Ben Johnson, the Executive Director of the American Immigration Council, was recently featured in a Fox News Latino article titled "Think Tank Says DHS Releases Criminal Immigrants, But Critics Counter Numbers Are Skewed". 

Johnson highlighted the misleading methodology used in a recent publication from the Center for Immigration Studies that stated 68,000 undocumented immigrants with criminal records were released from detention instead of being deported.

"Benjamin Johnson, Executive Director of the American Immigration Council, said that the people released were not all actually 'set free.'

'Being released from ICE custody often means being issued a notice to appear in court, released with an ankle bracelet or released under an order of supervision,' he said. 'These details were conveniently left out of the CIS analysis.'

Also, Johnson said, 'the 195,000 [of people charged] is completely misleading. Sadly, it isn’t necessary to be 'charged' by ICE in order to be removed from the country.'

He further explained: 'For instance, this 'charged' number does not include the 160,000 people who were removed based on the reinstatement of a prior removal or the 23,000 that were voluntarily returned to their country of birth,” he said.

'And, the number likely does not include the additional 101,000 that were removed from the U.S. based on an expedited removal order, where they were summarily removed without ever having a chance to take their case before a judge or receive any meaningful due process.'"

Published in the Fox News Latino

Dan Siciliano, Esq.

Dan Siciliano, Esq. is a Research Fellow at the Immigration Policy Center and the Executive Director at the Program in Law, Economics, and Business at Stanford Law School. This Perspective was written testimony prepared for the Senate Committee on the Judiciary.

New Americans in the Buckeye State

Released on Sun, Jul 26, 2009

The Immigration Policy Center has compiled research which shows that Ohio's immigrants, Latinos, and Asians are an integral part of the state's economy and tax base. As workers, taxpayers, consumers, and entrepreneurs, immigrants and their children are an economic powerhouse.

View Release