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The IPC's Guillermo Cantor Featured in Aging Today

Published on Wed, Aug 28, 2013

Guillermo Cantor, the Senior Policy Analyst at the Immigration Policy Center, was published in Aging Today in an article titled, "Will Immigration Reform Address Our Need for Eldercare Workers?"

In it, Cantor writes:

"The implications of S. 744 are manifold. First, by offering a path to citizenship for undocumented workers currently living in the country, the bill would certainly help stabilize the direct care workforce, which would in turn improve the quality of care. In particular, as a 2011 report by the National Council on Aging (NCOA) and the National Hispanic Council on Aging (NHCOA) has shown, once unauthorized care workers become legalized, they can legally drive, undergo enhanced background checks and access better opportunities for training and career advancement.

While the legalization of undocumented workers constitutes a significant step forward in strengthening the direct care workforce of current undocumented workers, the bill’s implications for the future flow of immigrant care workers must also be considered. Several signs suggest that the new legal immigration system created by S. 744 falls short of providing a sustainable solution to the eldercare shortage."

Published in the Aging Today

Jenny Hwang

Jenny Hwang is the Director of Advocacy and Policy for the Refugee and Immigration Program at World Relief. Previous to World Relief, she worked at the largest political fundraising firm in Maryland managing fundraising and campaigning for local politicians. Jenny has researched refugee and asylum law in Madrid, Spain through the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees. She is co‐author of Welcoming the Stranger: Justice, Compassion and Truth in the Immigration Debate.

 

New York Times Highlights Council Report as "A Blueprint For Action"

Published on Sun, May 11, 2014

The New York Times published an editorial calling for more transparency within Customs and Border Protection based on the Immigration Policy Center's report "No Action Taken: Lack of CBP Accountability in Responding to Complaints of Abuse".

The editorial stated: "If a Border Patrol agent beats, kicks, threatens or otherwise abuses you, you can file a complaint. What you can’t count on, evidently, is anything being done about it.

That is the sorry conclusion of a study released last week by the American Immigration Council, an advocacy organization in Washington. The council sought to collect data about abuse complaints against the Border Patrol — a difficult task, given the lack of transparency at Customs and Border Protection, the agency within the Department of Homeland Security to which the Border Patrol belongs.

The council had to sue under the Freedom of Information Act to obtain records of 809 complaints between January 2009 and January 2012. The accusations varied widely — of migrants kicked and stomped after being detained, struck in the face and head with flashlights and other objects, sexually groped, improperly strip-searched, verbally abused."

Published in the New York Times

Elizabeth B. Wydra

Elizabeth B. Wydra is Chief Counsel at the Constitutional Accountability Center, www.theusconstitution.org, a think tank, public interest law firm, and action center dedicated to fulfilling the progressive promise of our Constitution’s text and history.

Unreliable CIS Data Is Out-of-Date and Context

Released on Sun, Mar 08, 2009

Newspaper and television are running a narrow story quoting out-of-date and out-of-context data prepared by the immigration restrictionist group, the Center for Immigration Studies (CIS), who are alleging that 300,000 "illegal immigrants" will benefit from jobs created by the recently-approved economic stimulus plan. Unfortunately, these stories provide no counter-analysis from other research groups or experts who study these issues.

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2013 Immigration Litigation Meeting: Reading Materials

Reading Materials

Thursday, May 30th, 2013

11:30AM - Registration and Lunch

12PM-12:30PM - Opening remarks and introducations

12:30PM - 1:30PM - Legalization Challenges: Lessons Learned from IRCA
Read more...

ELECTION 2008: North Carolina - The Importance of Latinos and Immigrants

Released on Wed, Apr 30, 2008

In anticipation of the North Carolina primary on March 6, 2008, the Immigration Policy Center presents ELECTION 2008: North Carolina. The Importance of Latinos and Immigrants to the Economy and Electorate of the 'Tar Heel State.' This fact sheet provides useful information on the immigrant population and Latino electorate of a state with one of the fastest growing immigrant populations in the U.S.

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How Much Will Arizona's Immigration Bill (SB1070) Cost?

Released on Wed, Apr 21, 2010

Washington, D.C.- Frustrated by Congress' failure to pass comprehensive immigration reform, states across the country continue considering legislation that relies heavily on punitive, enforcement-only measures which not only fail to end unauthorized immigration but also have the potential to dig their state's finances deeper into a hole.

The latest example of this kind of policy nose dive is in Arizona. A recent bill, "Support Our Law Enforcement and Safe Neighborhoods Act" (SB 1070), was passed by the Arizona State legislature and awaits the signature of Arizona Governor Jan Brewer. As the Governor ponders whether or not to put her signature on SB 1070, she should consider the potential economic impact of the bill, which would require police to check a person's immigration status if they suspect that person is in the United States illegally. This bill, if it becomes law, will likely affect not only unauthorized immigrants, but all immigrants and Latinos in general. Given the vital role that immigrants and Latinos play in Arizona's economy, and considering Arizona's current budget deficit of $3 billion dollars, enacting SB 1070 could be a perilous move.Read more...

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