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Browse our resource page on unaccompanied children and the humanitarian situation on the U.S.-Mexico border.

Texas Cities Join Others in Brief Opposing Arizona Law

Published on Wed, Apr 04, 2012

The city of Austin didn’t like Arizona’s controversial immigration-enforcement law — SB1070 — when it first passed in 2010, and it still doesn’t like the measure today as the U.S. Supreme Court prepares to hear arguments for and against it.

In 2010, the city of Austin quickly passed a resolution that urged city departments to sever ties with businesses in that state.

Council members said then they wanted to send a message that they opposed racial discrimination of any kind, and they didn’t want to risk subjecting city employees to “unfounded detentions while on official city business” in Arizona.

Now, Austin — along with the city of Laredo and Dallas County — is again expressing dismay over the measure in an amicus brief with the U.S. Supreme Court. Oral arguments in the case are scheduled for April 25.

Meanwhile, a leading immigration-policy think tank has issued a report stating that if the justices rule in Arizona’s favor, individuals may still bring additional legal claims to halt the policy depending on how it is enforced.

The court will review four provisions of the Arizona law, which has been enjoined by a federal district court. They include a requirement that police officers attempt to determine the immigration status of a person stopped if they suspect the person is in the country illegally; a requirement that immigrants register with the federal government and carry a registration card with them; a provision that makes it a crime for an unauthorized immigrant to work, apply for work or solicit work; and a provision that allows officers to arrest immigrants without a warrant if probable cause exists that they have committed a deportable offense.

The amicus brief, joined by 41 cities, the United States Conference of Mayors and the National League of Cities, argues that the law, and others like it, open the door for racial profiling and adversely affect community policing efforts.Read more...

Published in the Texas Tribune

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IPC tab image for CIR 2014 from spirit of america / Shutterstock.com

IEC website images taken from the Flickr Creative Commons. All images used from the Creative Commons are attributed below:

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No ruling on SB 1070; more Supreme Court opinions expected Monday

Published on Thu, Jun 21, 2012

The California NPR station 89.3 KPCC used the IPC's Supreme Court Guide to Arizona v. United States in their article explaining the case: Read more...

Published in the 89.3 KPCC

Host Site Resources

HOST ORGANIZATIONS

The International Exchange Center of the American Immigration Council serves as a State Department designated third party sponsor for J-1 trainees and interns. We assist you through the application process and offer support and guidance for the duration of the trainee or intern program.


LINKS AND RESOURCES

Host Organization Expectations
Host Site Handbook
Should an Internship Be Paid or Unpaid?
Tax Assistance for J-1 ParticipantsRead more...

IPC's Mary Giovagnoli in USA Today

Published on Tue, Nov 27, 2012

IPC Director Mary Giovagnoli was quoted in USA Today's article on Senators Kyl and Hutchison's ACHIEVE Act legislation.  Here's an excerpt:

WASHINGTON -- Arizona Sen.Jon Kyl and Texas Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchison introduced legislation Tuesday to give legal status to young immigrants brought to the United States illegally as children.

The bill by the two Southwest Republicans -- and Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz. -- would offer special student and work visas and ultimately permanent legal status to those who earn a college degree or serve four years in the military.

"We need to have a discussion that is sensible, that is calm," said Kyl, who, like Hutchison, is retiring in January. "This particular piece of immigration reform seemed a logical place to begin."

Unlike several previous "Dream Act"-style bills, it does not offer a special pathway to citizenship, a conscious omission that is likely to be opposed by immigrant rights' groups and many Democrats.

"I think this is a doubled-edged sword," said Mary Giovagnoli, director of the Immigration Policy Center, which advocates for immigrants' rights. "On one hand, I think it's great that people are putting ideas out there about how to go forward on immigration. At the same time, I think it's really unfortunate that the choice is being made to put solutions out there that don't include the opportunity for people to become citizens."

Published in the USA Today

Stephen K. Fischel

Stephen K. Fischel commenced his government career in January 1974 with the Foreign Operations Division of the Passport Office, U.S. Department of State. He then transferred in 1975 to the Advisory Opinions Division in the Visa Office, also, of the Bureau of Consular Affairs at State.

Upon assuming the deputy division chief 's position in 1981, he entered the immigration community as a speaker and representative of the Visa Office. As Chief of the Legislation and Regulations Division in the mid 1980s, Mr. Fischel assumed responsibility for legislative policy for the Visa Office.

In 1997, he became the Director of the Office of Legislation, Regulations, and Advisory Assistance. In 1999, with the absorption of USIA, he received the Waiver Review Division under his responsibility. Over the following several years, he introduced technology (online status checks, online applications, etc.) into the process. Providing the division with more human resources and specifically designed case file control system, backlogs were eliminated as processing times were greatly reduced.

In 2001, the Assistant Secretary and Deputy Assistant Secretary for Consular Affairs asked Mr. Fischel to participate on the President's Bilateral Migration Talks with Mexico. He provided many options to address the "regularization" of undocumented Mexicans, crafted a framework for a bilateral Temporary Worker Program, and designed significant reform to the H-2B program. He continued involvement in this area as State's representative on the President's revised Temporary Worker Program until retirement.Read more...

Huffington Post Cites IPC Report in Op-Ed

Published on Sat, Jul 13, 2013

In a Huffington Post Op-Ed by James Zogby, the President of the Arab American Institute, cited an IPC report on America's immigrant heritage.  He writes:

"Immigrants have always been derided as "lazy," "different and unable to fit in," and a "drain on the economy." This was said of the Irish, the Italians and the Eastern and Central Europeans. In a marvelous study compiled for the Immigration Policy Center, researcher Jeffrey Kaye compares the recent bigoted statements made by politicians in Hazleton, Pennsylvania (who are themselves descendants of immigrants) with the statements made about their ancestors when they first arrived in America, a century ago. They too were defamed as "lawbreakers," " a drain on public funds" and "not able to assimilate.""

Published in the Huffington Post

Andrea Guttin, Esq.

Andrea Guttin, Esq. is an attorney currently residing in Austin, Texas. She is a graduate of the University of Texas at Austin and holds a J.D. and an M.A in Latin American Studies. She would like to thank Diego Garcia‐Olano for creating the database and inputting arrestee data, without which any analysis would have been impossible.

IPC Data on Taxes Paid By Undocumented Immigrants Cited by Latin Times

Published on Tue, Feb 11, 2014

The Latin Times cited data from the IPC's "Facts about the Individual Tax Identification Number (ITIN)" in a recent article titled "GOP Amendment Seeks To Deny Child-Tax Refund To Undocumented Children".

"A statement released by her office then said that the credit 'currently costs taxpayers billions', an assertion challenged shortly afterward by Univision analyst Fernando Espuelas in a column for the Hill.  Espuelas pointed out that undocumented immigrants often pay taxes using the Individual Taxpayer Identification Number (ITIN), contributing what he described as a “net multibillion-dollar gain for the federal, state and local treasuries, even when factoring in the Child Tax Credit”.  The Immigration Policy Center wrote in 2009 that in 2001, the ITIN brought in $300 million in taxes from undocumented filers."

Published in the Latin Times