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Understanding the Final Rule for J-1 Trainee and Intern Programs

New final rules became effective Sept. 9, 2010 for J trainee and intern programs 22 C.F.R.§ 62 (2010). With few exceptions, the final rule will produce little change to the way J trainee and intern programs have been administered since the interim-final rule of 2007.

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Our Shadow Population (Part II)

Published on Fri, Jan 13, 2012

Last week we looked at information about the role of immigrants in the U.S. and on the East End. This week we hear from government officials, and from groups that welcome immigrants, or want them all to go away.

Witness For Peace (“a politically independent, grassroots organization”) advocates immigration reform that guarantees equal rights for all families, clear and non-discriminatory pathways to citizenship, children’s rights to education regardless of immigration status, and an end to collaboration between police and immigration enforcers which erodes immigrant trust in the police. Some years ago, the NY Civil Liberties Union said that numerous towns in Suffolk County were selectively using housing codes and traffic enforcement to target immigrants.

In September 2011, the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ), after a two-year investigation, advised Suffolk County officials to improve police relations with immigrants. The investigation was prompted in part by the 2008 fatal stabbing in Patchogue of an Ecuadorian immigrant by local teenagers. The recommendations include outreach programs in Latino neighborhoods, investigation of possible hate crimes, and revision of procedures that discourage Latinos from interacting with police. The Suffolk police commissioner’s advisor on minority affairs said community meetings have been valuable in sharing information and gaining understanding of immigrants’ concerns.Read more...

Published in the The Sag Harbor Express

Nachito Herrera Receives Highest Honor From the American Immigration Council

Published on Thu, Mar 22, 2012

Twin Cities jazz pianist and Cuban immigrant Nachito Herrera has been named one of three recipients of the 2012 American Heritage Award, the highest honor granted by the American Immigration Council. The award will be presented at the American Immigration Lawyers Association Convention in Nashville on June 15th. Few musicians have received this honor--the last was Carlos Santana.

Over the past decade, Nachito Herrera has burrowed his way into the hearts of Twin Cities’ jazz fans with his monster technique, bottomless energy, and infectious enthusiasm for his homeland and its eclectic rhythms. Even fans of trad and polka now tap their Sorrel boots to montuno and clavé. Nearly monthly, Nachito spreads his artful fire across the stage at the Dakota Jazz Club in downtown Minneapolis, where he has presented sets of tunes ranging from Rachmaninoff to Ellington to Earth, Wind and Fire to Disney and more. Read more...

Published in the Jazz Police

Quick Fact: The cost of mass deportation

Mass deportation would cost $206 billion to $230 billion over five years.

Unreliable databases could cost even citizens their jobs

Published on Thu, Jun 07, 2012

IPC Senior Policy Analyst Michele Waslin wrote an article published in the Orlando Sentinel highlighting the problems with E-Verify:

Read more...

Published in the The Orlando Sentinel

Access to Courts

Access to Courts Federal court review is an important check on agency decision making because of the high stakes involved in immigration cases and the potential for error that accompanies the growing volume of cases. Through targeted litigation, the LAC has consistently advocated that statutory limits on judicial review must be narrowly construed. We also provide practice advisories, mentoring and other support to attorneys seeking review of unfavorable decisions impacting the rights of noncitizens. In addition, we advocate for the adoption of policies that help ensure all noncitizens a meaningful opportunity to be heard in the immigration court system.

Federal Courts | Immigration Courts and the BIA | Practice AdvisoriesRead more...

Mass. group registers 4,000 immigrants as voters

Published on Wed, Oct 17, 2012

IPC statistics were used in this Boston Globe article about registering naturalized citizens to vote: 

"The Immigration Policy Center says naturalized Americans represent about 12 percent of registered voters in Massachusetts, including their children born in the United States since 1965."

 

Published in the The Boston Globe