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Arizona's Law Is Most Extreme Anti-Immigration Measure—For Now

Published on Thu, May 06, 2010

Arizona’s law is—to date—the most extreme and has gone the furthest, but many states and localities have been introducing and passing immigration-related bills for several years, says Michele Waslin, a senior policy analyst at the Immigration Policy Center.

“There is a lot of frustration around the country because Congress, the federal government, has not acted on immigration reform. Everyone knows there is a problem, and it isn’t getting any better,” she says.

Published in the Campus Progress

Honoring Immigrants - Place Setting Project

Students will explore an immigrant's journey into the United States and honor his/her accomplishments by interviewing an immigrant, creating decorative placemats and inviting him/her to a banquet to celebrate.

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Immigrants Impact on Idaho Economy

Published on Thu, Jul 29, 2010

BOISE, Idaho -- A new study shows how immigrants, both legal and illegal, effect Idaho's economy.

Numbers from the Immigration Policy Center show immigrants made up 7.2 percent of Idaho's workforce in 2008. Of that, 3.1 percent were illegal immigrants.

The study also says that if all undocumented immigrants were removed from the state, Idaho would lose nearly $430 million in economic activity. "These immigrants are an integral part of our economy, they're an integral part of our communities and if they were to leave, there would be huge economic repercussions. So if the Federal Government acts, people will be able to come out of the shadows and legalize and pay their fair share on the economy," said Tyler Moran of the National Immigration Law Center.

The study also showed the purchasing power of immigrants in Idaho. Latinos purchasing power totaled 2.5 billion dollars. That a more than 500 percent increase from 1990.

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Published in the Fox News

EOIR Background and Security Check Regulations

On April 1, 2005, EOIR’s Background and Security Check regulations went into effect. The interim rule bars IJs and the BIA from granting most forms of relief until DHS has informed them that security checks are completed. This Practice Advisory provides basic information about the requirements and procedures under the interim rule and highlights the major changes to BIA procedures.

Published On: Wednesday, April 6, 2005 | Download File

Department of Homeland Security

The Yearbook of Immigration Statistics is a compendium of tables that provides data on foreign nationals who, during a fiscal year, were granted lawful permanent residence (i.e., admitted as immigrants or became legal permanent residents), were admitted into the United States on a temporary basis (e.g., tourists, students, or workers), applied for asylum or refugee status, or were naturalized. The Yearbook also presents data on immigration law enforcement actions, including alien apprehensions, removals, and prosecutions.

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SB 1070: New Study Released Showing Economic Impact of Latinos Leaving AZ

Published on Thu, Jul 29, 2010

For more than a year, senior researcher Dr. Walter Ewing and research associate Seth Hoy analyzed and compiled data on every state in the US to track the powerful impact immigrants have on this country. The result: A recent study released by the Immigration Policy Center that highlights both the political and economic power that immigrants—specifically Latinos and Asians—have on the United States. With Arizona's controversial SB 1070 scheduled to go into effect today (although a ruling yesterday by US District Judge Susan Bolton blocks some aspects of the law), politicians, business owners and the like should take note.

Published in the Latina

Advance Parole for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) Recipients

One of the benefits of DACA is that a recipient may seek permission – through a process known as “advance parole” – to travel abroad temporarily for humanitarian, educational, or employment purposes.  This practice advisory provides guidance on advance parole eligibility for DACA recipients; outlines how a DACA recipient may apply for advance parole; addresses the legal issues that can confront a DACA recipient considering travel on advance parole, including any potential risks; and finally, covers the impact that the travel may have on the DACA recipient’s future immigration benefits.

Published On: Wednesday, August 28, 2013 | Download File

Enrique's Journey

Author: Sonia Nazario

Sonia Nazario, a Los Angeles Times reporter researched the migration of children in a series of articles which won the Pulitzer Prize and inspired the writing of "Enrique's Journey." Nazario humanizes unaccompanied minors and informs readers of the realities of their incredibly dangerous journeys. “Enriques Journey” not just the story of Enrique, a teenager from Honduras but also explores the reasons families decide to make these dangerous choices and the underreported realities of the dangers. Nazario retraces Enriques steps to reunite with his mother who left to work in the US and send money back to Enrique when he was 5 years old. Her promise to return never happened and Enrique made the decision to make the journey including “el tren de la muerte”, the train of death. The book recounts Enriques journey as well as his fellow passengers who are trying to avoid robbery, assault, and death. Stories illustrate the horrors of other young migrants. Nazarios journalistic style engages readers while informing them with real facts. A new version for young readers was recently released. The new version still gut-wrenching and impossible to put down is toned down from the original version and more suitable for Junior High students.

Year Released: 2014

Why We Should Applaud ICE's Immigration Initiative

Published on Mon, Aug 30, 2010

As Mary Giovagnoli writes on the Immigration Policy Institute's Immigration Impact blog, 17,000 out of the close to 400,000 people deported in 2009, is not exactly a significant number. Still, I want to argue that these types of small tweaks to the immigration system are crucial to obtaining larger reforms down the road.

Published in the The Huffington Post

Jurisdictional Bars Under the INA

District Court Jurisdiction over Non-Removal Cases | Review of Mixed Questions of Law and Fact
Review of Sua Sponte Motions to Reopen
| Resources

District Court Jurisdiction over Non-Removal Cases

The Legal Action Center (LAC) urges a narrow interpretation of the statutory bars to review of discretionary issues in district court cases where discretionary relief may have been sought, but the cases themselves present legal or constitutional issues. This situation arises when, for example, a noncitizen seeks district court review of USCIS’s denial of an application for adjustment of status on non-discretionary grounds. This issue has become increasingly important as more noncitizens seek review of erroneous USCIS denials of applications for immigration benefits.

The LAC maintains that district courts do have jurisdiction over these cases and can review them under the Administrative Procedures Act. We argue that the bar to review of discretionary judgments found in INA § 242(a)(2)(B)(i) is inapplicable to a court’s review of non-discretionary statutory eligibility for an immigration benefit. We also argue that INA § 242(a)(2)(D) does not limit the jurisdiction of a district court to review constitutional and legal issues in a non-removal case.

CASES

Alla Barenboy v. Secretary of DHS et al., No. 10-1802 (3d Cir. amicus brief filed June 7, 2010) (court denied the petition on other grounds in a non-precedential decision).Read more...