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Issues in Immigration: A Debate

Issues in Immigration: A Debate explores conflicts, myths and facts about immigration and immigrants. This lesson plan increases student awareness about immigration issues through the art debate.

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Arizona Bullies Target Birthright Citizenship

Published on Tue, Jun 15, 2010

But the next target is not kids. It is babies. The next idea is to deny birth certificates to children born here to illegal immigrant parents. It’s not a new idea, but its one that keeps being coughed up by those who haven't found a problem they can't blame on illegal immigrants.

Call them bullies without a clue.

The Immigration Policy Center prepared a fact sheet for those who want to understand this a little better.

Published in the Arizona Republic

BIA "Affirmance Without Opinion": What Federal Court Challenges Remain?

This Practice Advisory discusses the types of Affirmance Without Option (AWO) challenges that have failed and those that remain available. The advisory also includes a chart identifying the primary cases in each circuit and how they have decided various AWO issues.

Published On: Wednesday, April 27, 2005 | Download File

The Urban Institute

The nonpartisan Urban Institute publishes studies, reports, and books on timely topics worthy of public consideration. The views expressed are those of the authors and should not be attributed to the Urban Institute, its trustees, or its funders.

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Nebraska Town: Is Illegal Immigration Crackdown Worth The Cost?

Published on Tue, Jul 27, 2010

Others say the Fremont City Council is right to look at the costs associated with enacting any kind of legislation.

“Good public policy involves weighing all the costs and benefits of enacting legislation," says Mary Giovagnoli of the American Immigration Council's Immigration Policy Center. "While Fremont may be motivated in this case to suspend the law because of the fear of litigation costs, there are numerous other costs to consider," she says, "including the loss of revenue to the town when people leave, stop supporting local businesses and paying taxes, as well as the psychological impact when a town goes down the road of driving people away."

Published in the Christian Science Monitor

Immigration Benefits and Pitfalls for LGBT Families in a Post-DOMA World

In United States v. Windsor, the Supreme Court held that Section 3 of the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) is unconstitutional.  With the end of DOMA, married LGBT binational couples can access the panoply of marriage-based immigration benefits and forms of relief from removal.  This practice advisory provides an overview of the agencies’ initial responses to Windsor and highlights some of the issues LGBT families will face in a post-DOMA world. It also includes information about the guidance USCIS issued on Friday, July 26.

Published On: Monday, August 5, 2013 | Download File

How the Novel Americanah Explores Immigration, Race, and Love

Author: Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

Told through a series of flashbacks,  by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, captures the stories of two Nigerians, Ifemelu and her childhood friend/first love, Obinze, who enter themselves into self-imposed exiles in America and Great Britain after their options for education are squelched by a military dictatorship back home. Read more...

Year Released: 2015

Estimate: 1 US kid in 15 born to an illegal immigrant

Published on Thu, Aug 12, 2010

The Immigration Policy Center, an immigrant-rights organization in Washington, D.C., said in a news release that without data on children with two illegal parents, the report "offers no real clarity."

Whether the change would strip citizenship from one baby or 1 million, it's a mean-spirited plan that wouldn't help the country with its illegal-immigration issues, said Michele Waslin, senior policy analyst with the Immigration Policy Center. Waslin also said calling these children "anchor babies" is both offensive and inaccurate.

Published in the Arizona Daily Star

Asylum Clock

Attorneys and asylum applicants across the country regularly experience problems with the “asylum clock” — a clock which measures the 150 days after an applicant files an asylum application before the applicant can apply for an employment authorization document (EAD). These problems include a lack of clear guidance about how immigration agencies - both EOIR and USCIS - should interpret and implement the law governing the clock, the lack of a formal review process when an EAD is denied, and a general lack of transparency in USCIS’ administration of the clock. As a result of these problems and increasing court backlogs, asylum applicants often wait much longer than the legally permitted timeframe to receive a work permit and are thus unable to support themselves and their families while their applications are pending.

The LAC has long advised attorneys about methods for addressing asylum clock problems and advocated for systemic change in the current asylum clock process. These efforts included the issuance, in 2010, of a comprehensive report on the asylum clock, Up Against the Clock:  Fixing the Broken Employment Authorization Asylum Clock, with Penn State Law School’s Center for Immigrants’ Rights. The report recommends solutions to asylum clock problems intended to ensure that asylum applicants become eligible for employment authorization without unnecessary delays and closer to the timeframe outlined in the INA.Read more...

Border Challenges

What Thousands of Interviews with Undocumented Migrants Tell Us about Achieving Effective Enforcement

Washington D.C. - While the immigration issue remains the subject of countless hearings, speeches, and speculation on Capitol Hill, for the last 3 years researchers at U.C.-San Diego have been documenting and assessing the impact and effectiveness of the U.S. border-enforcement strategy through interviews with over 3,000 migrants and potential migrants. The U.C.-San Diego research team has conducted interviews in Mexicans' hometowns in the states of Jalisco, Zacatecas, Oaxaca, and Yucatán, as well as in the U.S. cities that are their primary destinations.  Their most recent study was conducted in Oaxaca and San Diego County, from December 2007 to February 2008.  The research team's data, gathered from the people whose behavior has been targeted by the U.S. enforcement strategy, is the most direct and up-to-date evidence of whether border-enforcement efforts are actually keeping undocumented migrants out of the United States, and reveals the border strategy's significant unintended consequences. Read more...