Skip to Content

Programs:

Legalization

Fence isn't a cure-all for America's porous border

Published on Thu, May 27, 2010

Immigrant rights advocates say the fence prompts migrants to cross in remote areas where they face dangerous, often deadly obstacles.

"It's a very big problem," said Walter Ewing, a senior researcher for the pro-immigrant Immigration Policy Center.

Published in the Associated Press

Honoring Immigrants - Place Setting Project

Students will explore an immigrant's journey into the United States and honor his/her accomplishments by interviewing an immigrant, creating decorative placemats and inviting him/her to a banquet to celebrate.

View File

Securing Communities

Published on Thu, Jul 08, 2010

The Immigration Policy Center, an arm of the Washington-based American Immigration Council, says the program lacks sufficient oversight and a clear procedure for people detained in error to lodge complaints.

Published in the Toledo Blade

Failure to Appeal to the AAO: Does it Bar all Federal Court Review of the Case?

This Practice Advisory discusses whether and how a person can get review of a U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services decision in federal court if he or she did not appeal the decision to the Administrative Appeals Office (AAO). The advisory addresses the Supreme Court case Darby v. Cisneros, holding that a plaintiff is not required to exhaust non-mandatory administrative remedies in certain situations, and how it may apply to cases involving appeals to the AAO.

Published On: Thursday, July 22, 2004 | Download File

Department of Homeland Security

The Yearbook of Immigration Statistics is a compendium of tables that provides data on foreign nationals who, during a fiscal year, were granted lawful permanent residence (i.e., admitted as immigrants or became legal permanent residents), were admitted into the United States on a temporary basis (e.g., tourists, students, or workers), applied for asylum or refugee status, or were naturalized. The Yearbook also presents data on immigration law enforcement actions, including alien apprehensions, removals, and prosecutions.

View Link

Birthright Citizenship: The Big Republican Issue for 2010 Elections?

Published on Mon, Aug 02, 2010

Supporters of a change say the amendment adopted just after the Civil War was designed simply to make sure that former slaves became citizens, and wasn't intended to apply to illegal immigrants' kids. But the pro-immigration Immigration Policy Center offers a rebuttal, with scholar Elizabeth Wydra citing the "clear intent of the Reconstruction framers to grant U.S. citizenship based on the objective measure of U.S. birth rather than subjective political or public opinion."

Published in the San Francisco Chronicle

Enrique's Journey

Author: Sonia Nazario

Sonia Nazario, a Los Angeles Times reporter researched the migration of children in a series of articles which won the Pulitzer Prize and inspired the writing of "Enrique's Journey." Nazario humanizes unaccompanied minors and informs readers of the realities of their incredibly dangerous journeys. “Enriques Journey” not just the story of Enrique, a teenager from Honduras but also explores the reasons families decide to make these dangerous choices and the underreported realities of the dangers. Nazario retraces Enriques steps to reunite with his mother who left to work in the US and send money back to Enrique when he was 5 years old. Her promise to return never happened and Enrique made the decision to make the journey including “el tren de la muerte”, the train of death. The book recounts Enriques journey as well as his fellow passengers who are trying to avoid robbery, assault, and death. Stories illustrate the horrors of other young migrants. Nazarios journalistic style engages readers while informing them with real facts. A new version for young readers was recently released. The new version still gut-wrenching and impossible to put down is toned down from the original version and more suitable for Junior High students.

Year Released: 2014

Arizona teen pursues education in friendlier state

Published on Tue, Sep 07, 2010

According to the Immigration Policy Center in Washington, D.C., the DREAM Act, sponsored by Sens. Dick Durbin, D-Ill., and Richard Lugar, R-Ind., would allow "current, former and future undocumented high school graduates and GED recipients a pathway to U.S. citizenship through college or the armed services." This means that people like Alberto would be awarded a conditional lawful permanent resident status for six years, during which time they would have to complete two years of higher education or military service, although they would not be eligible for federal education grants.

Published in the Santa Fe New Mexican

Prosecutorial Discretion

Under the President’s Immigration Accountability Executive Action, prosecutorial discretion will be exercised differently. In addition to the announcement of a new DACA-like deferred action program for the parents of U.S. citizens and lawful permanent residents, the Immigration Accountability Executive Action expands the existing DACA program and sets forth new enforcement priorities that will bind ICE, USCIS and CBP. For more information on these changes, please see the American Immigration Council’s guide to the President’s Immigration Accountability Executive Action here.

The American Immigration Council is currently developing new resources on prosecutorial discretion

 

Prosecutorial discretion is the authority of a law enforcement agency or officer to decide whether to enforce the law in a particular case. In the immigration context, favorable exercises of prosecutorial discretion include grants of deferred action, stays of removal, and decisions to cancel or not issue a Notice to Appear (NTA). Since 2000, the legacy Immigration and Naturalization Service and current DHS agencies have issued more than a dozen guidance memoranda addressing prosecutorial discretion. The LAC has issued a practice advisory suggesting ways that immigration attorneys can influence the favorable exercise of prosecutorial discretion by DHS, and filed an amicus brief relating to the exercise of prosecutorial discretion in a Ninth Circuit case.Read more...