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Breaking the law applies equally

Published on Fri, Oct 28, 2011

Alabama politicians told the people that illegal immigrants cost the state $112 million a year, according to the Federation for American Immigration Reform. But the Immigration Policy Center also reports that illegal immigrants spend $130 million a year. Why was this not brought out?

 People say they are tired of illegal immigrants taking Alabama jobs, but how many state contracts have been awarded to out-of-state companies?

 How much money and how many teachers, farmers and other workers will lose their jobs? We get so much money per student and the state is already cutting back. How much more will they cut?

 We need to take a minute and look at Detroit and remember that that city once relied heavily on the auto industry; now some parts of the city have empty buildings. The auto industry is wonderful, but how many people do you know who are buying new cars in this economy?

 We need to protect our farmers and help our neighbors. If we are going to be immigration officers, are we going to start paying the Coast Guard and the federal employees, or are we going to let the federal government do it? They are not perfect, but if we start taking matters into our own hands, then we are no different than the immigrants. Breaking the law is the same for everyone, states included.

Published in the The Anniston Star

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E-Verify a bothersome but not insurmountable chore for area businesses

Published on Sat, Jan 14, 2012


Steve Hale of Hale Building Company in Anniston only wants to hire legal workers. He wants to comply with all laws.

But to him, the state is just not making it very easy.

Hale Building Company was one of many Alabama businesses with government contracts that were required to enroll with the E-Verify system this month to comply with the state’s immigration law. E-Verify is a free Internet service offered by the federal government that lets companies check the working status of employees by comparing a worker’s name to official records.

Hale said the process to enroll in the system, and just complying with the immigration law in general, has been difficult.

“There is a good bit of time needed to switch over to it,” Hale said. “And there is just a lot of confusion about what is to be done. But we’ve made a very valiant effort to conform to the new law.”

Hale said he does not agree with the way the state has implemented the law, which was passed last year and considered the toughest immigration legislation in the country.

“It seems like politicians could have done a better job to phase things in and explain them,” Hale said. “And we’re being asked to be the police of the industry, but we’re not in business to track these people down.”

Lance Taylor, president of the Taylor Corporation in Oxford, whose company also had to enroll in E-Verify this month, agreed with Hale that much of the immigration law is confusing.

“Every time they come out with something different, the lawyers try to keep us abreast with what we can and can’t do,” Taylor said. “There was just so much confusion when it first came out.”

John Bryan, vice president of the Sunny King Auto Group in Anniston, said his company also enrolled with E-Verify this month as a precautionary measure.Read more...

Published in the The Anniston, AL Star










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Copycat immigration enforcement bill dies in Mississippi Senate

Published on Wed, Apr 04, 2012

An immigration enforcement bill that contains the same type of provisions that have Arizona’s S.B. 1070 poised for a Supreme Court hearing died Tuesday in the Mississippi Senate.

Immigration Works, a national organization “advancing immigration reform that works for all Americans – employers, workers and citizens,” said Tuesday in a press release that “Mississippi isn’t the only state to hesitate on immigration this year. Lawmakers across the country are holding off. Some are waiting to see how the U.S. Supreme Court rules in its second immigration federalism case in so many years, U.S. v Arizona.”
The Supreme Court will hear arguments about Arizona’s law, known as S.B. 1070, on April 25.

S.B. 1070 has served as a model for other states and has brought to the forefront questions about how states can enforce existing federal immigration laws.

Immigration Works described “what made the difference in Mississippi”: “Business leaders and law enforcement officials spoke out persuasively, expressing concerns about the consequences of HB 488. The employer coalition that opposed the bill included the Mississippi Farm Bureau, the Mississippi Poultry Association, the state chapter of the Associated Builders and Contractors and several foresting and nursery groups, as well as blueberry and sweet potato growers.” (Read the full press release below.)

The Immigration Policy Center writes that H.B. 488 “would have, among other things, allowed police officers to determine the immigration status of individuals they ‘reasonably suspect’ are in the country without documents. While HB 488 is dead, however, state House members may still be looking to keep these immigration enforcement measures alive by inserting them in other bills.”Read more...

Published in the Florida Independent

2013 Celebrate America Local Contest Coordinators

If you are interested in participating in the 2013 Creative Writing Contest and are the parent or educator of fifth grade students please contact your local coordinator to get started.  Or email for more information.


Theresa Bailey Kennedy

Los Angeles
Maggie Castillo

Los Angeles
Sam Garrett

San Diego
Kimberley Best Robidoux

San Diego
Linda H. Schweitzer

San Francisco
Brenda Boudreaux

Santa Clara Valley
Randall Caudle
415-541-9290

Will a new immigration policy get Latinos to the polls?

Published on Fri, Jun 15, 2012

Mary Giovagnoli, director of the IPC, was quoted in a BBC article discussing the Administration's new policy offering deferred action to "DREAMers," young people brought to this country by their parents and fit certain criteria : Read more...

Published in the BBC

Dr. Edward R. Braithwaite

Edward R. Braithwaite was born in Guyana, South America. A British colony at the time, it did not offer facilities for tertiary education to its nationals. Seeking higher education outside the country, he gained admittance to Cambridge University in England.

During his first year as a student, war broke out between England and Germany. Volunteering for military service, he became a fighter pilot in the Royal Air Force. At war's end, he returned to Cambridge and completed his degree in Physics.

He was suddenly and painfully confronted with one of the realities of British life from which both Cambridge and fellowship in the Royal Air Force had sheltered him - the cruel rigors of racial discrimination within British society.

Dr. Braithwaite eventually found employment as a teacher in one of London's most depressed neighborhoods. Over time he came to the surprising realization that he had an aptitude for teaching and writing. He applied himself to achieve some measure of ease and confidence within both disciplines. This led him to write about his experience in teaching, resulting in the publication of his first book "TO SIR, WITH LOVE".

In 1960 he was invited to work in Paris, France as Human Rights Officer for the World Veterans Foundation and later moved to UNESCO as an Education Consultant. When Guyana became independent from Britain in 1966, the new government asked him to be its first ambassador to the United Nations.Read more...

Immigrant among first in nation to receive temporary reprieve from deportation

Published on Sat, Nov 03, 2012

IPC statistics were used in this AJC article about Christian Jimenez, one of the first immigrants in the U.S. to receive a reprieve from deportation under Obama's new immigration policy:

Nearly 1 million immigrants across the U.S. are now eligible for deferred action, according to an estimate by the Immigration Policy Center, an arm of the American Immigration Council, an immigrant rights and policy group in Washington. Of those, 24,360 live in Georgia, the eighth-largest total among states.

Published in the The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

Geraldo Cadava

Geraldo Cadava, a native of Tucson, Arizona, specializes in histories of the U.S.‐Mexico border region and Latina and Latino populations in the United States. Harvard University Press will publish The Heat of Exchange, his book about culture and commerce in the Arizona‐Sonora border region since World War II, in 2012. Cadava teaches courses on Mexican American History, Latino Studies, the U.S.‐Mexico Borderlands, and Race and Ethnicity in the United States at Northwestern University.