Skip to Content

Programs:

Legalization

FAQs




Prospective Applicant FAQs:
[top]

1. What occupational categories can the American Immigration Council sponsor?
The American Immigration Council is designated by the U.S. Department of State to sponsor J-1 intern and trainee programs in the following occupational areas:

• Arts and Culture
• Information Media and Communications
• Management, Business, Commerce and Finance
• Public Administration and Law
• Social Sciences, Library Science, Non-clinical Counseling, Social Services
• The Sciences, Engineering, Architecture, Mathematics and Industrial Occupations
• Tourism

2. How long can the internship or training program be?
Intern programs have a maximum duration of 12 months. Trainee programs have a maximum duration of 18 months.

3. What are the minimum qualifications for an international intern?
Potential J-1 interns must be able to document and/or demonstrate the following to meet basic eligibility requirements:

• Sufficient English language fluency (to be determined by American Immigration Council staff)
• Current enrollment at a post-secondary, degree-granting academic program outside of the United States or
• Graduation within the past 12 months from such post-secondary academic program outside of the United StatesRead more...

Most ‘illegals' are are here to stay

Published on Mon, Apr 30, 2012

We are not sure how it would help the United States to see the exodus of millions of taxpayers with homes, cars, children and jobs. Yet, the hope for a mass exodus of people who fit that description is part of what inspired new immigration-enforcement laws in Arizona, Utah, Oklahoma, Georgia, South Carolina and Alabama.

Best estimates say that roughly 11 million residents of the United States live here illegally. Some came here by getting away with misdemeanor border crossings. Others overstayed visas. Regardless, illegal residency is not a crime. It is a non-criminal, civil dispute with government.

Read more...

Published in the Colorado Springs Gazette

Green Card Stories

The immigration debate is boiling over. Americans are losing the ability to understand and talk to one another about immigration. The new Arizona immigration law makes it clear that we must find a way to connect on a human level.

Green Card Stories does just that. The book depicts 50 recent immigrants with permanent residence or citizenship in dramatic narratives of about 1,000 words each, accompanied by artistic photos. Rather than couching immigration in terms of economics or politics, these stories appeal to the heart.

Each story is as old as the foundation of this immigrant nation, but also reflects the global trends and conflicts of the 21st century: the aspiring dentist who fled war-torn Sudan with just three T-shirts and a pair of shoes; the Caribbean-born orthopedic surgeon facing deportation; the Iraqi bodyguard for U.S. troops blinded by a car bomb; a former Mexican farm worker and school dropout turned high school principal. Arriving from all corners of the globe, coming for work, love, to study or escape persecution, they all share a steely resourcefulness and a fierce love for America. Green Card Stories tells the true story of our nation: E pluribus unum--out of many, one.Read more...

Minnesota's Latino students weigh chance to study, work without deportation fears

Published on Mon, Aug 13, 2012

Twin Cities Pioneer Press article, "Minnesota's Latino students weigh chance to study, work without deportation fears," cites IPC's study (Who and Where the DREAMers Are), which states that more than 9,000 immigrants living in Minnesota could benefit from President Obama's deferred action: Read more...

Published in the Twin Cities Pioneer Press

D. Jean Wu

Ms. D. Jean Wu grew up in Taiwan and came to the United States at the age of fourteen. She earned her undergraduate degree in marketing at the University of Virginia and her master's degree in information science at George Mason University. She also attended business executive programs at the Amos Tuck School of Business Administration at Dartmouth College.

Ms. Wu is the founder of Integrated Management Services, Inc. (IMSI). The company was established to provide solutions with an emphasis on information security and infrastructure security.

Ms. Wu serves on the Board of Visitors of the George Mason University, the Board of Trustees of the George Mason Foundation and the Board of Directors of the Virginia Hospital Center.

Ms. Wu is a long-standing supporter of charitable and educational organizations in the Washington D.C. Metropolitan area, including the Close Up Foundation, Heads Up, Boys and Girls Clubs of Greater Washington, and the Best Friends Foundation.

Return to all Honorees

The IPC's Mary Giovagnoli in Talking Points Memo

Published on Wed, Apr 24, 2013

Mary Giovagnoli, the Director of the IPC, was quoted in a Talking Points Memo article discussing the effect that the Boston marathon bombing would have on the current immigration debate:

"Mary Giovagnoli, director of the Immigration Policy Center and a former immigration adviser to the late Sen. Ted Kennedy (D-MA), told TPM that she saw nothing in the law that would affect the screening side of the process. She noted that procedures had been tightened significantly over the last decade already, especially in regards to “high risk” countries.

“The changes are not changes that implicate national security or have any connection to Boston,” she said."

Published in the Talking Points Memo

Maria Blanco

Maria Blanco serves as the Executive Director for the Chief Justice Earl Warren Institute at Berkeley Law, University of California. She served as executive director of the Lawyers' Committee for Civil Rights of the San Francisco Bay Area. She brings more than 20 years of experience as a litigator and advocate for immigrant rights, women's rights and racial justice. Blanco is also the co‐chair of the California Coalition for Civil Rights, a group dedicated to building a progressive national agenda for civil and human rights.

IPC Cited in USA Today

Published on Tue, Sep 24, 2013

The Immigration Policy Center was cited in a recent USA Today article titled, "Temporary Visa Opens Up World for Young Immigrant."  The article, focusing on Iowa DACA recipient Eren Sanchez, mentions the IPC's oft-cited number of potentially eligible DACA recipients.

"Sanchez, 24, is among the more than 565,000 young immigrants in the U.S. who have received two-year visas in the past year. The permits are offered under a year-old federal program for people ages 15 to 30 who have grown up in the U.S., but arrived illegally in the country as children.

Under the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals policy put in place in August 2012 by the Obama administration, about 950,000 immigrants nationwide were eligible for the visas, according to an estimate from the Immigration Policy Center in Washington, D.C."

Published in the USA Today

Dowell Myers, Ph.D.

Dowell Myers, Ph.D. is Professor of Urban Planning and Demography in the School of Policy, Planning, and Development, and director of the Population Dynamics Research Group, at the University of Southern California. This report is drawn from his new book, Immigrants and Boomers: Forging a New Social Contract for the Future of America (Russell Sage Foundation, 2007).

 

IPC Director Quoted on Congressional Efforts to Return Unaccompanied Children

Published on Wed, Jul 30, 2014

Mary Giovagnoli, Director of the Immigration Policy Center at the American Immigration Council, was recently quoted in a Caller Times article about efforts by Congress to revise the 2008 Trafficking Victims Protection Act (TVPA) in order to speed up the return process for unaccompanied children from Central America.

“I think the HUMANE Act is a little bit inaptly titled,” said Mary Giovagnoli, policy director at the American Immigration Council.

Giovagnoli said federal officials are likely telling children about the advantages of voluntary return and that if they don’t have any problems, they can just go home and won’t be detained.

“A lot of these Mexican kids are probably being voluntarily returned without having any full screening that they are required to get under law to see whether or not they are a trafficking victim,” Giovagnoli said.

Published in the Caller Times