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Revised Definition of 'Anchor Baby' Part of Leftist Agenda, Critics Say

Published on Thu, Dec 08, 2011

A decision by the American Heritage Dictionary to revise its definition of "anchor baby" -- labeling it an offensive and disparaging term -- is an attempt to manipulate the "linguistic landscape" and push a leftist agenda, some opponents of illegal immigration say.

"Anchor baby" was among roughly 10,000 words -- including "hoodie" and "babydaddy" -- added to the dictionary's fifth edition last month. The hot-button term, a noun, was initially defined as: "A child born to a noncitizen mother in a country that grants automatic citizenship to children born on its soil, especially such a child born to parents seeking to secure eventual citizenship for themselves and often other members of their family."

That definition caught the attention of Mary Giovagnoli, director of the Washington-based Immigration Policy Center, who heard American Heritage Dictionary executive editor Steve Kleinedler read it during a radio interview last month. Giovagnoli blasted the definition on the organization's blog last Friday, saying it masked the "poisonous and derogatory" nature of the term.

By Monday, the term had been changed. It is now defined as such: "Offensive  Used as a disparaging term for a child born to a noncitizen mother in a country that grants automatic citizenship to children born on its soil, especially when the child's birthplace is thought to have been chosen in order to improve the mother's or other relatives' chances of securing eventual citizenship."

The revision is now a "well-crafted" definition of how the term is used, Giovagnoli said.

But not everyone agrees.

"That's a political statement and it's not even accurate," said Mark Krikorian, executive director of the Center for Immigration Studies. "[An anchor baby] is a child born to an illegal immigrant."

Krikorian said the revised definition makes a political statement and is much more than neutral, "just the facts" reference material.Read more...

Published in the Fox News

To halt cartels, block cash flow

Published on Thu, Feb 09, 2012

 

If you want to stop a monster, cut off its head. Simple logic.

If you want a secure the border, go after the crime syndicates that routinely penetrate our southern border for their own nefarious purposes. Go after the leaders of the Mexican cartels. Go after their money.

The minions of these sophisticated international criminal organizations smuggle in drugs and people at will. They take back tens of billions of dollars in dirty profits. We put manpower and technology on the border. They find ways around it.

They take their profits out in shrink-wrapped bundles of hundred-dollar bills. Electronic transfers. Money schemes. Prepaid value cards that can store and transport money.

Joaquin "Chapo" Guzman, leader of the Sinaloa cartel, regularly appears on Forbes list of the world's wealthiest people.

"If U.S. forces can find Osama bin Laden, I am sure, with Mexican help, they can find and arrest Chapo," former Arizona Attorney General Terry Goddard wrote in an article for the Immigration Policy Center. "That arrest would do more to stop the flow of contraband into the U.S. and the slaughter in Mexico than all the billions spent so far."

Through the Merida Initiative, the U.S. has provided money and expertise to Mexico to fight the cartels, but time is not on our side if we hope to engage in a more vigorous assault on these criminal gangs that breach our borders. Mexican President Felipe Calderon, who runs an aggressive campaign against the cartels, will leave office in December. He cannot run in Mexico's July presidential election. His successor may take a more conciliatory approach to the cartels. Mexico is weary of a drug war that has cost more than 47,000 lives in the past five years.

Instead of discussing the cartel threat, the U.S. has been focusing on fences, immigration sweeps and deportations. These are politically popular responses that do not weaken criminal organizations in Mexico.Read more...

Published in the The Arizona Republic

The LAC Docket | Volume I, Issue 3

The Newsletter of the American Immigration Council’s Legal Action Center

June 3, 2011
Our Work | Requests for Evidence | Quick Links | Donate

OUR WORK

Enforcement

Obama Administration urged to exercise prosecutorial discretion in compelling cases

Frustrated by Congress’ failure to enact comprehensive reform, immigration advocates have increasingly advocated for a robust prosecutorial discretion policy that encourages immigration officers to grant relief from deportation in compelling cases. In a letter to DHS Secretary Janet Napolitano in early April, the American Immigration Council and the American Immigration Lawyers Association (AILA) asked the Department of Homeland Security to offer written guidance setting forth detailed criteria on the favorable exercise of prosecutorial discretion. A subsequent legal memorandum released by the Immigration Council and co-signed by two general counsels of the former Immigration and Naturalization Service outlined specific steps the Administration could take to forestall removals in sympathetic cases. Read more...

Most ‘illegals' are are here to stay

Published on Mon, Apr 30, 2012

We are not sure how it would help the United States to see the exodus of millions of taxpayers with homes, cars, children and jobs. Yet, the hope for a mass exodus of people who fit that description is part of what inspired new immigration-enforcement laws in Arizona, Utah, Oklahoma, Georgia, South Carolina and Alabama.

Best estimates say that roughly 11 million residents of the United States live here illegally. Some came here by getting away with misdemeanor border crossings. Others overstayed visas. Regardless, illegal residency is not a crime. It is a non-criminal, civil dispute with government.

Read more...

Published in the Colorado Springs Gazette

Barbara Murik Chesman

Barbara Murik Chesman was born in the Schlachtenzee Displaced Persons Camp in Berlin, Germany after World War II. Her parents, Abraham and Lisa Murik (nee Davidowicz) both survived the horrors of the Holocaust and emigrated from Germany to the United States in March of 1949.

The family settled here in Washington, DC where Mrs. Chesman attended Wheatley Elementary School, the Hebrew Academy of Washington, and Western High School (now Duke Ellington School for the Performing Arts). She later attended the University of Maryland where she earned a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Government and Politics in May of 1968.

While at college, Mrs. Chesman started working part-time for the Department of State in the Bureau of Consular Affairs for the Passport Office. Following graduation, Mrs. Chesman became a full time employee of the Department of State in August of 1968 in the Office of Passport Services. She met her future husband Bernard Chesman in May of 1971 and they were married June 4, 1972 at Beth Sholom Synagogue in Washington, DC. Immediately following their marriage, they moved to Atlanta Georgia for 7 months, but decided to return to Washington in January 1973 where Mrs. Chesman resumed her career in the Passport Office.

Mrs. Chesman has held many positions in almost every part of the Office of Passport Services but her most notable achievement came in June of 1994, when the Special Issuance Agency (the passport agency which handles all passports for the Federal government) was made a separate entity and she was named Director. Currently, Mrs. Chesman serves in that position today.Read more...

Minnesota's Latino students weigh chance to study, work without deportation fears

Published on Mon, Aug 13, 2012

Twin Cities Pioneer Press article, "Minnesota's Latino students weigh chance to study, work without deportation fears," cites IPC's study (Who and Where the DREAMers Are), which states that more than 9,000 immigrants living in Minnesota could benefit from President Obama's deferred action: Read more...

Published in the Twin Cities Pioneer Press

Royce Bernstein Murray, Esq.

Royce Bernstein Murray, Esq. worked for the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and the former Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) for eight years: as Associate Counsel in the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) Office of the Chief Counsel, Refugee and Asylum Law Division from 2003‐2008, and as a Presidential Management Fellow/Asylum Officer in the INS Office of International Affairs from 2000‐2002. At present, Ms. Murray is an adjunct professor of immigration law at the University of the District of Columbia David A. Clarke School of Law and an independent refugee and immigration law consultant. She is a graduate of the Georgetown University Law Center and holds a B.A. with distinction in political science from the University of Michigan.

The IPC's Mary Giovagnoli in Talking Points Memo

Published on Wed, Apr 24, 2013

Mary Giovagnoli, the Director of the IPC, was quoted in a Talking Points Memo article discussing the effect that the Boston marathon bombing would have on the current immigration debate:

"Mary Giovagnoli, director of the Immigration Policy Center and a former immigration adviser to the late Sen. Ted Kennedy (D-MA), told TPM that she saw nothing in the law that would affect the screening side of the process. She noted that procedures had been tightened significantly over the last decade already, especially in regards to “high risk” countries.

“The changes are not changes that implicate national security or have any connection to Boston,” she said."

Published in the Talking Points Memo

Hiroshi Motomura

Hiroshi Motomura, Susan Westerberg Prager Professor of Law at the UCLA School of Law, is the co‐author of two immigration‐related casebooks: Immigration and Citizenship: Process and Policy (Seventh Edition 2012), and Forced Migration: Law and Policy, published in 2007. The substance of this report is drawn from Hiroshi Motomura, “The Discretion That Matters: Federal Immigration Enforcement, State and Local Arrests, and the Civil–Criminal Line,” UCLA Law Review 58 (2011): 1819‐1858, which cites the relevant sources.