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Seattle Times Puts Spotlight on Winner of CEC Creative Writing Contest

Published on Sun, Jun 16, 2013

The Seattle Times put a spotlight on Erin Stark, the fifth-grader who won the Community Education Center's 2013 Creative Writing Contest. From the article:

"'There’s just a lot more people than just a basic everyday American,' said Erin, of Bellevue.

"The stories she’s heard inspired a poem titled, 'What Would You Miss About Immigrants If They Didn’t Come to America?,' which she entered in a writing contest sponsored by the American Immigration Council. The contest invites fifth-graders to submit a writing entry based on the theme, 'Why I am Glad America is a Nation of Immigrants.'

"Erin’s poem won first place out of more than 5,000 entries. Her reward is an all-expenses-paid trip to San Francisco, where she will read her winning entry at the council’s annual benefit dinner on June 28."

Published in the Seattle Times

Dowell Myers, Ph.D.

Dowell Myers, Ph.D. is Professor of Urban Planning and Demography in the School of Policy, Planning, and Development, and director of the Population Dynamics Research Group, at the University of Southern California. This report is drawn from his new book, Immigrants and Boomers: Forging a New Social Contract for the Future of America (Russell Sage Foundation, 2007).

 

IPC's Mary Giovagnoli in U.S. News & World Report

Published on Tue, Jan 28, 2014

A recent article in U.S. News and World Report, quoted Mary Giovagnoli, Director of the IPC. The article, titled, "The Republican Party's Impossible Immigration Balancing Act," said:

"When it comes to immigration reform, House Republicans are in an impossible spot: Members are left balancing congressional elections with the GOP's larger 2016 interests, reluctant to hand a Democratic president a victory while hoping to make up ground with the Latino community...

"In order to gain traction with Latino voters, they will have to do more than simply talk about a plan. They will have to enact one, take a comprehensive approach, shed the party's enforcement-only rhetoric and openly consider a path to legalization for the 11 million, an option that many lawmakers have struggled to publicly support. While Republicans nationally need Latino support to win elections, few members from GOP-controlled districts face a high volume of Latino voters back home to put pressure on them. Instead, it's anti-immigration reform activists who pressure sitting members to stay away from anything that resembles legalization for the 11 million.

"The policy solutions to the problem and the political viability of them are potentially miles apart," says Mary Giovagnoli, director of the Immigration Policy Center, a nonpartisan immigration research group."

Published in the U.S. News and World Report

Criminal Alien Program (CAP) FOIA Documents

Full Response from ICE

Cover letter dated Oct, 19, 2012 from Catrina M. Pavlik-Keenan, FOIA Officer, ICE to Michael Wishnie, Director of the Jerome N. Frank Legal Services Organization at Yale Law School. The letter states that ICE continues to take the position that the request is insufficiently defined and imposes an unreasonable burden on ICE.  Notwithstanding ICE’s position and the fact that the lawsuit is the subject of litigation, ICE is providing the results of a two-hour search of the ICE Office of Enforcement and Removal Operations for records responsive to the FOIA request.  The search, conducted in conjunction with the preparation of the Declaration of Jamison Matuszewski, produced 473 responsive pages of documents, of which 303 were released in full.  The responsive portions of the remaining pages were withheld pursuant to FOIA exemptions 5, 6, 7(C) and (E). 

Key Documents:

Pages 11-12:  ICE memo (9/29/06) re:  ICE’s transfer of program responsibility and staff (Immigration Enforcement Agents and Investigative Assistants) assigned to the Office of Investigations’ (OI) Institutional Removal Program (IRP) and Alien Criminal Apprehension Program (ACAP) to the Office of Detention and Removal Operations (DRO) consolidated Criminal Alien Program (CAP).Read more...

Jorge Ramos Cites Immigration Council Data in Debate With Sean Hannity

Published on Mon, Aug 17, 2015

In an interview with Fox News host Sean Hannity on Donald Trump's immigration platform, Univison anchor Jorge Ramos cited data from the American Immigration Council's report "The Criminalization of Immigration in the United States" which notes that immigrants are less likely to commit crimes than the native-born population.

Watch the exchange below:

Published in the Examiner

DACA Blogs at Immigration Impact

The Legal Action Center and the Immigration Policy Center has blogged extensively about DACA at Immigration Impact. Here are our past blogs on the topic:Read more...

Immigration Two-Step in the Stimulus Bill

Released on Thu, Feb 12, 2009

The House-Senate conferees who crafted the final version of the economic stimulus legislation faced considerable pressure to include immigration-related measures that are long on rhetoric and short on results. Read the Immigration Policy Center's statement on the final provisions in the bill.

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What Will Happen When Citizens Have to Ask the Government For Permission to Work?

Released on Tue, Apr 01, 2008

Many on Capitol Hill are eyeing favorably bills that create a massive electronic employment databases.  While proponents of the Shuler-Tancredo "SAVE Act" (HR 4088) and the Johnson "New Employee Verification Act of 2008" (HR 5515) talk tough about cracking down on illegal immigrants, the truth is their bills' nationwide mandatory electronic employment verification system require all American workers, foreign- and native-born alike, to seek the government's permission to work.

View Release

Business

Many obstacles prevent employers from petitioning successfully for workers, in both nonimmigrant and immigrant classifications: overly restrictive interpretations of legal requirements, shifting adjudication standards, the proliferation of requests for evidence, and an overriding lack of transparency in agency decision-making. To date, few lawyers have opted to litigate these issues, due to time constraints, lack of litigation experience, fear of creating unfavorable precedent, and client resistance, among other factors.

The Council seeks to challenge the “culture of no” that has become the norm in agency decision making by: co-counseling individual cases that will be selected as part of a broader legal strategy to challenge the government’s misapplication of the law in the business contex; providing technical assistance to lawyers interested in litigating business immigration issues in federal court; exploring and, where appropriate, undertaking affirmative litigation; filing amicus briefs in strategically selected business immigration cases pending in federal courts and administrative agencies; and filing FOIA requests and, where necessary, litigating to obtain documents regarding agency policies and practices.Read more...