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Hispanics caution Obama

Published on Wed, Nov 30, 2011

President Barack Obama risks losing important Hispanic votes if he does not do more on the immigration issue, protesters from Winston-Salem and surrounding areas said Tuesday during a rally in Charlotte, echoing a message that has been expressed at similar rallies nationwide.

"For me, the rally means: 'Obama, you really need to help us, and if not, we can take you out of office,'" said Ana Sosa, a 19-year-old Mocksville resident who can't vote because she doesn't have legal permission to be in the United States but who says she can affect how other people vote. Read more...

Published in the The Winston-Salem Journal

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Whether you are an educator, librarian, museum curator, immigration attorney, community activist or just someone who is interested in the unique ways immigrants and immigration touch our lives, we believe you have something valuable to add to the immigration dialogue. Don’t miss out on an opportunity to get involved in this pivotal topic. If you have an idea or would like to make a suggestion on how we can make immigration more accessible to your community, please email us at teacher@immcouncil.org

Community Grants

The Community Education Center awards educational  grants of $100 to $500 to fund educational projects about immigrants and immigration.  No deadline available on rolling basis.

"Celebrate America" Creative Writing Contest

The American Immigration Council is proud to sponsor the annual “Celebrate America” Creative Writing Contest in an ongoing effort to educate the public about the benefits of immigration to our society.

"Change in Motion" Multimedia Contest

The American Immigration Council is pleased to announce a call for submissions to the 2013 “Change in Motion” Multimedia Contest. The competition challenges today’s young adults to explore the role that immigration plays in their lives and communities through video and other multimedia projects.

 

Quick Fact: Unauthorized immigrants pay taxes

At last count, households headed by unauthorized immigrants paid $11.2 billion in state and local taxes.

 

These States Will Lose Billions If Their Illegal Immigrants Are Deported

Published on Mon, Jan 23, 2012

Unauthorized immigrants made up 5.2% (about 8 million) of the U.S. workforce in 2010, according to a report from the American Immigration Council's Strength In Diversity report.

The same year, the American Immigration Council and American Progress estimated that deporting all unauthorized immigrants from the country and sealing the borders to future unauthorized immigration would "reduce the U.S. GDP by 1.46% annually—or $2.6 trillion in lost GDP over 10 years." 

In January, the American Immigration Council compiled information about the full political and economic power of "immigrants, Latinos, and Asians" for all 50 states and the District of Columbia.

At least 15 states, including California, Texas, and New York, stand to lose billions if illegal immigrants are deported. The number of illegal immigrants living in each state has been obtained from the 2008 report released by Pew Hispanic Center.

Published in the Business Insider

2006 Winner, Jasminh Duc Schelkopf

My Mom “Thuy”

By Jasminh Duc Schelkopf

International School of Indiana

 

My mother’s name is Thuy. She was born in Saigon, South Vietnam. Her father was a 3-star Lieutenant General for the South Vietnam military and her family had almost everything that you could possibly think of before the civil war of Vietnam. However, when they lost their country, they lost everything. After the war, all they had left was their hope and beliefs.

 

In 1975, North Vietnam won the war. When my mother was only twelve years old (8th Grade), she and her brother and sister were forced to go to Canada. The rest of her family was then scattered around the world in places like France, Australia, Canada and the U.S.A. They all had a very tough time there because they had no support and no money as new immigrants.

 

For seven years after the war, my mother went to school and worked during the evening to help out my grandfather. My mother attended college for only two years because she needed a full time job to support her family. She also went to beauty school, graduated, and worked for the family. Then, having lived in Canada for ten years, my mother realized there was a better future for her in the U.S.A. -- “The Land of Opportunity.” She decided to move to Pennsylvania in 1985.

 

My mother began hard work at a beauty shop near Philadelphia and she worked hard everyday. Her dreams were to “ONE DAY” create her own salon and reach her many dreams. Due to her talents, she developed many clients and made a lot of friends. She saved as much money as she could and even avoided eating out or going to the movies or doing anything fun that might cost money.

 Read more...

Immigrants' Deportation Cases Stumble Over U.S. Policy Change

Published on Sun, Apr 15, 2012

When the Department of Homeland Security announced last summer that some lower-priority cases should be shelved in immigration court through a process called prosecutorial discretion, Alexandru Ghilan looked like the perfect candidate.

The 29-year-old from Moldova had come to the United States on a work visa six years ago. He had applied for political asylum because of incarcerations and beatings he said he had endured as an activist protesting the former Communist regime in his eastern European home country.

Ghilan, who earned a law degree in Moldova, did not enter the country illegally and has no criminal record in the United States. He has worked and paid taxes since he came to the country. He has a wife and a 1-year-old daughter who is a U.S. citizen.

His asylum request has been denied: Communists no longer hold power in Moldova. He is appealing the case. Now, it has been passed over for administrative closure through prosecutorial discretion even though an immigration judge recommended that Ghilan be considered. If Ghilan had been granted that closure, he would no longer be living under the constant threat of deportation.

Government prosecutors aren't saying why some seemingly good fits for prosecutorial discretion, such as Ghilan, are being denied. But immigration attorneys are saying this is happening too often.

"It looks like it's a national problem," said Denver immigration attorney Bryon Large, who heard input from other lawyers from around the country during a recent meeting of the American Immigration Lawyers Association.

Figures collected by the American Immigration Council show that about 9 percent of 165,000 immigration cases reviewed since late last year have been suspended through the exercise of prosecutorial discretion.Read more...

Published in the Denver Post

American Immigration Council’s Outbound Exchange to Brazil

What: The American Immigration Council’s International Exchange Center is sponsoring an outbound exchange program to São Paulo and Rio De Janiero to study migration environmental, and human right issues from a Brazilian point of view.

When: Sunday, November 6 – Saturday, November 12, 2011

Price:  $1,950/person includes hotel, breakfast, lunch, local transportation, and all meeting and entrance fees.

For more information see our "Save the Date."

 

States move cautiously on immigration after Supreme Court ruling

Published on Tue, Jun 26, 2012

IPC staff lawyer Ben Winograd was quoted in a CBS article about the effect of the Supreme Court case over SB 1070 on other states:

For the states that have the same provisions as Arizona, the Court's decision provides clarity.

"To the extent that they have identical provisions, it's open and shut," staff attorney Ben Winograd with the American Immigration Council said.

...

Winograd says that the additional court cases will provide much more clarity.

"Based on the Supreme Court decision alone, I would be surprised" if the states move forward with their laws in the short term, Winograd said.

Published in the CBS News

2012 Creative Writing Contest 2nd Place Winner: Nikita Ranjit Nair

America through a Kaleidoscope

By: Nikita Ranjit Nair

 Austin, TX

 

I closed my eyes and imagined all the people as Lennon asked.

I wondered what was in this America.

I thought of vast cornfields, smoky mountains, and wondrous golden bridges.

I recalled majestic towers scraping the skies, watched over by a lady with a torch.

I imagined the rivers, gulfs, lakes, dams and other great American waters.

This is what I saw….

I saw hard working people all over our America.

Some had jobs, some gave up looking, and some never lost hope.

I saw in my mind’s eye all these beauties but something was missing.

I closed my eyes tighter and asked John to help me Imagine better.

This is what I saw….

People from all over the world.

Coming to America with dreams,

They bring ideas, imagination, and creativity.

They bring culture, traditions and their values.

They bring hard work, perseverance, and strength.

Then I smiled when I saw them.

Diversity and its true meaning.

To bring different people together to keep America great.

In my land of the beautiful, the free, and the united.

Come on over those who want to work here.

Respect our country and you shall be Americans like us.