Skip to Content

Programs:

Legalization

Dr. Edward R. Braithwaite

Edward R. Braithwaite was born in Guyana, South America. A British colony at the time, it did not offer facilities for tertiary education to its nationals. Seeking higher education outside the country, he gained admittance to Cambridge University in England.

During his first year as a student, war broke out between England and Germany. Volunteering for military service, he became a fighter pilot in the Royal Air Force. At war's end, he returned to Cambridge and completed his degree in Physics.

He was suddenly and painfully confronted with one of the realities of British life from which both Cambridge and fellowship in the Royal Air Force had sheltered him - the cruel rigors of racial discrimination within British society.

Dr. Braithwaite eventually found employment as a teacher in one of London's most depressed neighborhoods. Over time he came to the surprising realization that he had an aptitude for teaching and writing. He applied himself to achieve some measure of ease and confidence within both disciplines. This led him to write about his experience in teaching, resulting in the publication of his first book "TO SIR, WITH LOVE".

In 1960 he was invited to work in Paris, France as Human Rights Officer for the World Veterans Foundation and later moved to UNESCO as an Education Consultant. When Guyana became independent from Britain in 1966, the new government asked him to be its first ambassador to the United Nations.Read more...

Washington Post Cites IPC in King Fact Check

Published on Mon, Jul 29, 2013

The Washington Post's blog, The Fact Checker, recently cited the IPC in an article rating the factuality of recent statements from Congressman Steve King.  The article, which gave King "Four Pinocchios," said:

"In fact, King’s fact says much less than he thinks it does. Estimates suggest that there might be about 2 million people who could eventually be eligible under the DREAM Act, almost evenly split between men and women. Let’s assume, for the sake of argument, that 1,000 (1/20th of one percent) are valedictorians. That would mean King assumes 100,000–or one-tenth of all “DREAMers” or about 20 percent of the men—are drug smugglers.

But the American Immigration Council, a pro-immigration group, cites a 2007 study that found that “for every ethnic group, without exception, incarceration rates among young men are lowest for immigrants, even those who are the least educated. This holds especially true for the Mexicans, Salvadorians and Guatemalans who make up the bulk of the unauthorized population.”"

Published in the Washington Post

Geraldo Cadava

Geraldo Cadava, a native of Tucson, Arizona, specializes in histories of the U.S.‐Mexico border region and Latina and Latino populations in the United States. Harvard University Press will publish The Heat of Exchange, his book about culture and commerce in the Arizona‐Sonora border region since World War II, in 2012. Cadava teaches courses on Mexican American History, Latino Studies, the U.S.‐Mexico Borderlands, and Race and Ethnicity in the United States at Northwestern University.

IPC Data on DREAMers Cited in California's Long Beach Post

Published on Tue, Feb 11, 2014

The IPC report "Who and Where the DREAMers Are, Revised Estimates" was cited by the Long Beach Post in an article titled "LBCC, CSULB Participate in Largest Scholarship Fund for 'DREAMer' Students". 

"Anissa—then a young history student at Cal State Long Beach who happens to also be undocumented—posed a rhetorical question to Post readers: 'I don't even recollect being in Mexico—where does that put me?'

Anissa is one of an estimated 1.8M undocumented persons living in the United States, the vast majority of whom were brought here illegally from Latin America while they were babies or young children. According to the Immigration Policy Center, nearly half of those individuals live in California and Texas."

Published in the Long Beach Post

Eric L. Olson

Eric L. Olson is Senior Advisor to the Security Initiative at the Mexico Institute of the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington, DC. He served as the Interim‐Director for Government Relations at Amnesty International USA, and was Amnesty’s Advocacy Director for the Americas from 2002‐2006. Prior to Amnesty, he was the Senior Associate for Mexico, and Economic Policy at the Washington Office on Latin America for eight years. He worked at Augsburg College’s Center for Global Education in Cuernavaca, Mexico from 1989‐1993 where he was the program director. From 1986‐1988, he worked in Honduras, Central America as a development specialist for several local non‐governmental organizations.

 

Pew Report Shines Light on Failed Immigration Policy

Released on Tue, Feb 17, 2009

A new report from the Pew Hispanic Center entitled A Rising Share: Hispanics and Federal Crime analyzes the ethnic composition of those sentenced in federal courts. Beneath the startling headline, however, is a familiar story. Immigrants do represent a disproportionate share of the federal prison population because immigration law is under the purview of the federal courts.

View Release

The LAC Docket | Volume III, Issue 1

The Newsletter of the American Immigration Council’s Legal Action Center

January 16, 2013
Our Work | Quick Links | Donate

OUR WORK

   Access to Counsel

LAC Challenges DHS Restrictions on Access to Counsel, Court Orders Release of USCIS Counsel Policies

AIC v. DHS and USCIS, No. 1:11-cv-01971 (D.D.C. filed Nov. 8, 2011)
AIC v. DHS and CBP, No. 1:11-cv-01972 (D.D.C. filed Nov. 8, 2011)
AIC v. DHS and ICE, No. 1:12-cv-00856 (D.D.C. filed May 31, 2012)Read more...

Raids' Impact on Families and Hate Groups On the Rise

Released on Thu, Apr 03, 2008

Last summer's failure by the federal government to reform the nation's broken immigration system has had strong and lasting repercussions. Stepped up raids are causing upheaval in communities and anti-immigrant extremists have hijacked the immigration debate. Both of these disturbing trends provide additional evidence of the need for a solution to our ongoing immigration policy problems.

View Release

DACA Blogs at Immigration Impact

The Legal Action Center and the Immigration Policy Center has blogged extensively about DACA at Immigration Impact. Here are our past blogs on the topic:Read more...

The American Immigration Council's 5th Grade National Creative Writing Contest Winners Announced

Julia Culbert of Santa Clara Valley Wins National Contest

Released on Mon, May 10, 2010

Washington, D.C. - The American Immigration Council is pleased to announce the winners of the national 5th Grade "Why I Am Glad America Is a Nation of Immigrants" creative writing contest. Read more...

View Release