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No Action Taken: Lack of CBP Accountability in Responding to Complaints of Abuse

Released on Tue, May 06, 2014

Washington D.C. - Today, the American Immigration Council releases No Action Taken: Lack of CBP Accountability in Responding to Complaints of Abuse, by Daniel E. Martinez, Ph.D., Guillermo Cantor, Ph.D., and Walter A. Ewing, Ph.D., a report that analyzes complaints filed with U.S. Customs and Border Protection between 2009 and 2012. The analysis is based on information received through Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) litigation. The report examines one of the few avenues available for people to report mistreatment by Border Patrol agents - namely, the complaint system. For a long time, advocates and legal providers on the border have highlighted the flaws in the complaint system. This report is the first systematic attempt to document the problem in a rigorous way. In addition, a coalition of immigrants' rights groups has developed and released recommendations to DHS to address the CBP Complaint Process.Read more...

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Long, complex path to citizenship puts lives on hold

Published on Mon, Mar 08, 2010

Imad Doski applied for his U.S. citizenship five years ago with dreams of a high-dollar job translating Kurdish and Arabic.

Since then, the native of Iraq has discovered one private contractor pays U.S. citizens $60,000 more per year than other immigrants. Another only hires citizens.

"When you are a citizen, opportunities are different, pay is sometimes different, people sometimes look at you differently," said Doski, a Nashville bookkeeper.

 

Published in the The Tennessean

Class Action Lawsuit for Unlawful Delays in Employment Authorizations Filed

Released on Tue, May 26, 2015

Washington D.C.– Last Friday, three immigrants and two immigration service providers filed a nationwide class action lawsuit against U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) and the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) for unlawfully delaying the adjudication of their applications for employment authorization. Filed by the American Immigration Council, Northwest Immigrant Rights Project (NWIRP), Gibbs Houston Pauw, Scott D. Pollock & Associates, P.C., and Van der Hout, Brigagliano & Nightingale, LLP, the complaint alleges that USCIS’s policies and practices of failing to timely adjudicate applications for employment authorization documents (EADs) or, alternatively, failing to issue interim employment authorization, violate the governing regulations and the Administrative Procedure Act.  

By regulation, USCIS must either adjudicate EAD applications within a fixed time period or issue interim employment authorization. Yet, USCIS regularly fails to do either, leaving immigrants in a precarious position, unable to work legally and at risk of losing their jobs, related benefits and, in some states, their driver’s licenses. At a recent meeting with AILA members, USCIS representatives indicated that “USCIS no longer produces interim EADs.” Plaintiffs seek this Court’s intervention to compel USCIS to adjudicate EAD applications within the time period mandated by the regulations or, if the regulatory time period has expired, issue interim employment authorization. Read more...

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Anti-Immigrant Groups Pretend to Be Green

Published on Tue, Apr 20, 2010

Nativist groups have a history of trying to hide their anti-immigrant agenda under a green mantle. Back in the 90s, John Tanton tried to take over the Sierra Club and force them to adopt a position against immigration, but his tainted agenda rejected by truly green individuals. Well, if you can't join them, create your own group: Progressive for Immigration Reform (PFIR) is the latest Tanton Network creation, meant to trick progressive into backing hate.

Published in the Change.org

326 Immigrant Rights Groups Urge Supreme Court to Let Immigration Relief Programs Go Forward

Brief features profiles of families whose lives would improve if immigration directives were allowed to take effect

Released on Tue, Mar 08, 2016

WASHINGTON, D.C. - A diverse coalition of 326 immigration, civil rights, labor, and social service groups has filed an amicus (friend-of-the-court) brief with the U.S. Supreme Court in United States v. Texas, urging the court to lift the injunction that blocked the executive actions on immigration that President Obama announced in November 2014.

The Obama administration’s expansion of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program, as well as a new Deferred Action for Parents of Americans and Lawful Permanent Residents (DAPA) initiative were stopped by a federal district court in Texas, and that court’s order subsequently was upheld by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit. The lawsuit against the president’s executive actions was brought by 26 states. Late last year the federal government appealed the case to the Supreme Court.

“If the injunction is lifted, many families will be more secure, without the looming threat that loved ones will be deported at a moment’s notice,” the brief filed by the civil rights groups argues. “Many deserving individuals will also have access to better jobs and the ability to improve their lives, the lives of their families, and their communities. DHS has discretion to grant or deny applications for the initiatives at issue, and the concocted argument to the contrary should not be used to prevent individuals from even applying.”Read more...

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Past Exhibits

Exhibits are hosted by the American Immigration Council, a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization dedicated to increasing public understanding of immigration law and policy and the value of immigration to American society; to promoting public service and excellence in the practice of immigration law; and to advancing fundamental fairness and due process under the law for immigrants. Read more...

New Arizona Immigration Crackdown Stirs Emotional Reaction

Published on Thu, May 06, 2010

The recent tragic death of Arizona rancher Rob Krentz made national headlines and brings new attention to the problem of border security. The killing of the third-generation rancher by suspected members of a Mexican drug cartel has become a flashpoint in the immigration debate as residents of border states and politicians cite the episode as further proof that the U.S. must do more to secure the violent U.S.-
Mexico border. The murder of Krentz comes at a time when well-armed cartel factions have lately battled each other and federal authorities in several Mexican border cities, resulting in thousands of brutal killings, kidnappings and gun battles. The increased violence has brought renewed cries by border state residents for help from the government in securing the U.S. border.

Published in the Dayton City Paper

From War on Terror to War on Bias

The objective of From War on Terror to War on Bias is to broaden the view students may have of Iraqi and Muslim immigrants. Students will examine current stereotypes and other forms of judgment as well as gain insight into the struggles immigrants face while adapting to a new culture.

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Justice Dept. Challenges Arizona Over Other Immigration Law Targeting Employers

Published on Thu, Jun 03, 2010

"The argument that the Justice Department is making here, is you know, the fundamental question, which is where does state authority begin and end when it comes to federal immigration law?" said Benjamin Johnson, executive director of the American Immigration Council.

Published in the Fox News

BIA "Affirmance Without Opinion": What Federal Court Challenges Remain?

This Practice Advisory discusses the types of Affirmance Without Option (AWO) challenges that have failed and those that remain available. The advisory also includes a chart identifying the primary cases in each circuit and how they have decided various AWO issues.

Published On: Wednesday, April 27, 2005 | Download File