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Emmanuel Irono

Emmanuel O. Irono came to the United States as a foreign exchange student and planned to return to Nigeria after college to work for his father's construction company. But when both of his parents died within two years, he decided against returning and began paying his tuition by working as a school janitor.

After graduating, Mr. Irono took a job working as a budget analyst for a federal contractor. However, he wanted to start his own firm, and he bought out a small struggling janitorial service company's supplies for $10,000 and turned it into $14 million profit generator. He renamed the company Motir, in honor of his parents - Memory of Theresa Irono Romonus (MOTIR).

With an exceptional track record in senior level management and administration, Mr. Irono has grown Motir Inc. from one division of custodial services to a full scale management consulting company with divisions for Construction and Environmental Services, Facilities Management and Medical Staffing.

Never forgetting his roots, the Nigerian born Irono has traveled all over the world and has created a company of diversity that continues to give back to his homeland through his non profit organization TIS (To Inspire Strong) African Children Fund. TIS feeds, educates and provides medical treatment for the children of Africa. Whether feeding the hungry and abandoned, supplying educational tools for rural area school children, or implementing an AIDS Awareness Program, Mr. Irono is taking local action and reaching global heights.

As Chief Executive Officer, Mr. Irono has served on the Board of Directors of major organizations, while continuing to direct all aspects of Motir's operational policies, objectives, and initiatives responsible for the attainment of both short and long term goals.Read more...

AIC Executive Director Ben Johnson in the New York Times

Published on Thu, Apr 04, 2013

The AIC's Executive Director, Ben Johnson, was quoted in the New York Times on Thursday.  The article, focusing on the pathway to citizenship expected to be included in the upcoming immigration bill, called on Johnson's expertise on how the process is expected to work:

“There is broad recognition that these folks will have to go through a process of atonement,” said Benjamin E. Johnson, executive director of the American Immigration Council, a group in Washington that works to build support for immigration. “But ultimately at the end of the process they would become full-fledged members of our society through American citizenship.”

Published in the New York Times

Roberto G. Gonzales Ph.D.

Roberto G. Gonzales Ph.D. is an Assistant Professor at the University Of Washington School Of Social Work. He earned his Ph.D. in the department of sociology at the University of California. His research focuses on the ways in which legal and educational institutions shape the everyday experiences and the transitions to adulthood of poor, minority, and immigrant youth. Current projects include a four and a half year study of undocumented immigrant young adults in Los Angeles, a companion study in Seattle, and comparative projects on immigrant youth in the U.S. and Europe. Gonzales is the author of When Do Papers Matter? An Institutional Analysis of Undocumented Life in the United States (forthcoming), Young Lives on Hold: The College Dreams of Undocumented Students and Why Integration Matters: Undocumented Immigrant Youth and Making a Case for Moving Beyond Enforcement and his work appears in numerous publications.Read more...

IPC Report Featured in VOXXI

Published on Wed, Sep 04, 2013

A recent article on VOXXI featured a recent Special Report created by IPC Fellow Rob Paral, entitled, "Stepping Up:  The Impact of the Newest Immigrant, Latino, and Asian Voters."

The report, which details the future changes the U.S. Congress can expect in terms of voter demographics, was the central focus of the article: 

"The newly released study shows that the electoral composition in congressional districts is on track to change as more naturalized U.S. citizens and young Latinos and Asians — many of whom support immigration reform — become eligible to vote in the next few years.

“Representatives contemplating their eventual vote on immigration reform need to weigh the numerous policy arguments in favor of reform and make an informed decision, but they must also understand the shifting demographic dimensions of their districts,” stated Rob Paral, the author of the study."

Published in the VOXXI

Robert L. Smith

Robert L. Smith is a veteran journalist who covers international cultures and immigration issues for the Cleveland Plain Dealer, Ohio’s largest newspaper. Bob grew up in Cleveland, where he lives with his wife, Cleveland Orchestra violinist Chul‐In Park, and their two children, Jae, 5, and Sun‐Hee, 3. He has written extensively about immigration issues and has interviewed people at all points of the immigrant experience, from undocumented field workers to hugely successful entrepreneurs.

NBC Highlights Council Report on DACA Recipient Gains

Published on Mon, Jun 16, 2014

The Immigration Policy Center's report "Two Years and Counting: Assessing the Growing Power of DACA" was cited in the NBC article "White House To Honor DACA Recipients As Champions of Change." The data from this report examines the gains made by DACA recipients over the two year since the program was announced.

"The Obama Administration issued deferred deportation as an executive order two years ago. Since that time tens of thousands of undocumented young immigrants known as DREAMers have applied and just recently became eligible to renew their two-year deportation deferments.

study released Monday by Harvard researchers Roberto Gonzálesand Angie M. Bautista-Chavez for the American Immigration Council found almost 60 percent of deferred deportation (DACA) recipients surveyed had been able to obtain new jobs, 45 percent had increased their earnings, and almost six-in-ten had obtained driver's licenses, broadening education and employment options."

Published in the NBC

Due Process Resource Page

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The current immigration removal system—from arrest to hearing to deportation and beyond—does not reflect American values of due process and fundamental fairness.  In fact, the immigration removal system lacks nearly all of the due process protections that come into play in the U.S. criminal justice system. 

With this in mind, we've created this resource page to draw attention to issues surrounding due process in the immigration system, including reports on the problems and flaws of the current system, as well as possible fixes.

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DHS Announces Changes In Worksite Enforcement Policies

Released on Wed, Apr 29, 2009

Today the Department of Homeland Security announced policy changes around worksite immigration enforcement. The Immigration Policy Center (IPC) issued a statement.

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U.S. Economy Still Needs Highly Skilled Foreign Workers

Released on Mon, Jun 30, 2008

Although the recent downturn of the U.S. economy has caused unemployment to rise in some industries, like construction, it has done little to dampen the perennially strong demand for skilled workers in high-tech companies, universities, and research institutes.

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