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"New American" Voters Largely Ignored by Politicians

Published on Thu, Oct 14, 2010

The report calls these voters "New Americans." They include recent immigrants and their children, coming largely but not entirely from Hispanics and Asian countries.

Walter Ewing is senior researcher at the Immigration Policy Center. He says in terms of voting habits, New Americans have one thing in common.

"What you can assume about this voting group is that they're going to respond to candidates who seem to be positive about immigration, since that is either themselves of their parents. And that does not seem to fall along party lines."

Ewing found that between 1996 and 2008, the number of new American voters increased more than 100 percent, and is likely to keep growing.

But Ewing says these voters tend to be forgotten by politicians, even though in California they accounted for more votes than the margin by which now President Barack Obama beat John McCain.

Published in the Capital Public Radio

VAWA

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Working with partner non-profits, the LAC convinced USCIS to adopt a policy that allows VAWA applicants to apply for adjustment of status under INA § 245(a) even if the applicant is present in the U.S. without inspection and admission or parole. This policy favorably impacts thousands of battered immigrants.

 

Appreciating America's Heritage: 2009 Edition

The American Immigration Council (formerly the American Immigration Law Foundation) is pleased to present the 2009 "Appreciating America's Heritage" Teachers' Resource Guide. Each year, AILF publishes a new edition of this guide because it is important to promote respect, dignity and an appreciation for everyone in this country, regardless of where you were born. By ensuring our children learn that every person deserves respect and that celebrating multiculturalism is at the heart of our American values, the sooner the next generation can end the divisive rhetoric that has divided America for too long.

View the 2009 "Appreciating America's Heritage"  Teacher Resource Guide

Sen. Robles' immigration bill could become national model

Published on Thu, Jan 06, 2011

Robles' bill could also be a blueprint for other states. After Arizona passed a heavy-handed law making it a state crime to be in the country illegally, copycat bills sprang up all over the United States. Now 25 states, including Utah, have made similar proposals. Robles' bill, could have a similar impact, said Wendy Sefsaf, communications director for the American Immigration Council, a Washington D.C. based think tank.

"I think Utah is setting an example for the rest of the country by being solution oriented in a way that other states aren't," she said. "The legislation coupled with the Utah Compact has really made Utah stand out."

Sefsaf said she regularly refers inquiring legislators to Utah. Robles said she's already fielded phone calls from curious legislators in Texas, Ohio, Kansas and Florida — among others.

"If Utah pulls this off, the rest of the country will be watching with interest," Sefsaf said. "There are a lot of states out there looking for an alternative to what Arizona has done."

Published in the Dessert News

Litigation Clearinghouse Newsletter Vol. 4, No. 10

This issue covers E-Verify litigation, prolonged detention class actions, favorable BIA precedents, removal cases involving the statute of limitation to rescind adjustment, and recently filed AILF briefs.

Published On: Friday, September 11, 2009 | Download File

Green Card Stories

Author: Introduction by Laura Danielson and Stephen Yale-Loehr, Stories by Saundra Amrhein, Photographs by Ariana Lindquist

The American Immigration Council is proud to support the publication of Green Card Stories. Green Card Stories (due to be printed in November 2011) is an incredible tribute to the diverse backgrounds that make up our immigrant population in America today. The American Immigration Council’s mission is to “strengthen America by honoring our immigrant history by shaping how Americans think about and act towards immigration now and in the future” and we can’t think of a better way to further our mission than through this beautiful and touching book.

Not only can you pre-order books for yourself, your office, family members, clients, etc. you can also pre-order a book to donate to your local school, library or community center or you can donate a book to one of the Council’s designated “hot spots” where education on immigration is needed most. Could your Member of Congress use a thank you or a gentle reminder of who our immigrant population is? Donate a copy of Green Card Stories to a Congressional office. All donated books will be delivered free of charge with a note indicating your generous gift.

To get a preview of the book, check out this slideshow.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Read more...

Year Released: 2011

High School-Adult

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The 2012 Budget and Our Unsecured Border

Published on Thu, Mar 03, 2011

President Obama is taking heat from all sides this week for his 2012 budget proposal, which proposes increased funding for immigration enforcement and border militarization. While immigrant rights advocates are predictably up in arms over the proposal, House Republicans are (somewhat uncharacteristically) demanding significant cuts to border security funding -- on the grounds that the Obama administration's efforts to secure the border have been ineffective and fiscally irresponsible.

Obama's future immigration priorities remain counterproductive

As Walter Ewing reports at Alternet/Immigration Impact, the proposed Department of Homeland Security (DHS) budget reveals the Obama administration's consistently conflicted priorities on immigration. While the budget makes good (albeit modestly) on the administration's promise to fund humane detention alternatives and better oversight of enforcement programs, the overwhelming bulk of the funding supports expansion of controversial and ineffective enforcement programs. Ewing writes:

The enforcement-heavy focus of the President's proposed DHS budget is readily apparent in the top-line numbers. The budget for Customs and Border Protection (CBP) would be $11.8 billion; up 3 percent from FY 2011. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) would receive $5.8 billion, up 1 percent from the previous year. And U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) would get $2.9 billion, down 5 percent from FY 2011. As is so often case, immigration services get the short end of the stick.

The administration's continued emphasis on border security is particularly troubling in light of three recently released reports which suggest that increased enforcement efforts have proven to be totally ineffective at securing the border.

Despite increased funding, border remains unsecuredRead more...

Published in the Huffington Post

Litigation Clearinghouse Newsletter Vol. 2, No. 5

This issue covers SSI litigation, motions to reopen filed by people who have left the United States, lawsuits challenging detention at the Hutto facility, new Litigation Clearinghouse issue pages, and a district court decision finding jurisdiction to review an adjustment of status denial.

Published On: Thursday, April 12, 2007 | Download File

In Arizona, Illegal Immigrants Pay Taxes, Too

Published on Fri, Apr 22, 2011

In honor of Tax Day, the Immigration Policy Center posted a reminder that often gets ignored in the illegal immigration debate, especially those who accuse illegal immigrants of mooching off the system from public schools to hospitals.

Using a methodology from the nonpartisan Institute for Taxation and Economic Policy (ITEP) and information from the Pew Hispanic Center figures on each state's illegal immigration population using numbers from the 2010 Census, the ITEP came up with an estimate on state-specific tax payments.

Yes, immigrants pay taxes, too:

There were an estimated 11.2 million unauthorized immigrants in the U.S. as of 2010. Pew has also estimated the unauthorized population for each state. Pew has found that unauthorized immigrants are likely to be less educated than native-born U.S. citizens and legal immigrants, and they tend to work in low-wage jobs. Thus the average family income of the unauthorized population is lower than the average family income for U.S. citizens or legal immigrants. The average income of a household headed by an unauthorized immigrant is estimated to be $36,000; 10 percent of which goes towards remittances to family members in countries of origin.

According to the report, Arizona is in the top 10 of state receiving the most revenue from households headed by illegal immigrants. In 2010, Arizona's illegal immigrants paid $38 million in personal income taxes $45 million in property taxes and $348 million in sales taxes:

Sales tax is automatic, so it is assumed that unauthorized residents would pay sales tax at similar rates to U.S. citizens and legal immigrants with similar income levels.

Similar to sales tax, property taxes are hard to avoid, and unauthorized immigrants are assumed to pay the same property taxes as others with the same income level. ITEP assumes that most unauthorized immigrants are renters, and only calculates the taxes paid by renters.Read more...

Published in the Tucson Weekly