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Groups Sue over Failure to Provide Lawyers for Children in Deportation Proceedings

Released on Wed, Jul 09, 2014

Washington D.C. – The American Civil Liberties Union, American Immigration Council, Northwest Immigrant Rights Project, Public Counsel, and K&L Gates LLP today filed a nationwide class-action lawsuit on behalf of thousands of children who are challenging the federal government's failure to provide them with legal representation as it carries out deportation hearings against them.

Each year, the government initiates immigration court proceedings against thousands of children. Some of these youth grew up in the United States and have lived in the country for years, and many have fled violence and persecution in their home countries. The Obama Administration even recently called an influx of children coming across the Southern border a "humanitarian situation." And yet, thousands of children required to appear in immigration court each year do so without an attorney. This case seeks to remedy this unacceptable practice.

"If we believe in due process for children in our country, then we cannot abandon them when they face deportation in our immigration courts," said Ahilan Arulanantham, senior staff attorney with the ACLU's Immigrants' Rights Project and the ACLU Foundation of Southern California. "The government pays for a trained prosecutor to advocate for the deportation of every child. It is patently unfair to force children to defend themselves alone."

The plaintiffs in this case include:Read more...

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Reviewing first year of immigration policy under Obama

Published on Tue, Mar 02, 2010

The Immigration Policy Center today has released a thoughtful and detailed analysis on the Obama administration's work on immigration. The report focuses on all the key areas: worksite raids, E-verify, detention, immigration benefits, reform, etc.

Here's just one quick excerpt on specific issues such as enforcement and border strategy.

 

Published in the Houston Chronicle

A Talk With Mary Giovagnoli

Published on Wed, Apr 21, 2010

The Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency (ICE), part of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS, ) has come under increasing criticism because of its poor treatment of would-be immigrants held in detention – including a number of unreported deaths – lack of medical facilities, administrative bungling resulting in loss of records, and absence of due process for detainees at ICE detention centers.

Published in the The World According to Bill Fisher Blog

Crime, immigration connection unclear, Justice Dept statistics suggest.

Published on Mon, May 03, 2010

Arizona Governor Jan Brewer cited “border violence and crime due to illegal immigration” as motivations for signing a controversial law requiring people in Arizona to carry proof that they are in the U.S. legally.

But FBI and U.S. Department of Justice data show that Arizona’s violent crime rate is lower than the U.S. average and has been declining more rapidly than the U.S. average, The Independent found.

Published in the The New Mexico Independent

Border Boletín: Debunking Myths About SB 1070

Published on Wed, Jun 02, 2010

The Immigration Policy Center has issued a 14-page guide to Arizona's new immigration enforcement law: What you need to know about the new law and how it can impact your state.

The Washington D.C.-based Center is a research and policy arm of the American Immigration Council that advocates for comprehensive immigration reform.

Published in the Arizona Daily Star

Entrepreneurship and Innovation Update – February 28, 2014

Latest Research

Immigrants make cities more economically competitive. A recent post on Immigration Impact highlights a recent report from Americas Society/Council of the Americas (AS/COA) describing five ways immigrants make cities more economically competitive. Specifically, immigrants 1) contribute to a dynamic labor force and spur economic growth, 2) are more likely to start businesses and create jobs in their cities, 3) are critical to helping cities counteract population decline, keeping economies vibrant and strong, 4) make cities more attractive by raising housing values, and 5) contribute to a talented workforce through higher levels of education.Read more...

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WV Immigrant Population Is Slowly Increasing, Research Says

Published on Thu, Jul 08, 2010

Seth Hoy is a research associate with the Immigration Policy Center. He says that, compared to neighboring states, West Virginia’s population of immigrants, Asians and Latinos, is on the lower end.

"But what’s interesting is that they do have an economic impact on the state," he said. "The purchasing power of Latinos and Asians was $1.1 billion in 2009."

Hoy defines purchasing power as how the target groups spend money in the local economy. This includes the tax money they contribute, as well as personal and educational expenses.

Published in the West Virginia Public Broadcasting

"Arriving Aliens" and Adjustment of Status: The Impact of the Interim Rule of May 12, 2006

This Practice Advisory discusses the impact of an interim rule repealing two former regulations which barred all “arriving aliens” from adjusting status if they are in removal proceedings. This advisory provides a brief history leading to the rule, defines key terms, discusses the impact of the rule, and suggests steps that a parolee can take to benefit from the rule.

Published On: Wednesday, November 5, 2008 | Download File

Motions to Suppress in Removal Proceedings: A General Overview

This Practice Advisory provides a general overview of motions to suppress, a tool used to prevent the introduction of evidence obtained by federal immigration officers in violation of the Fourth Amendment, Fifth Amendment, and related provisions of federal law. This updated version has been changed to reflect recent developments regarding the suppression of identity-related evidence, the “fruit of the poisonous tree” doctrine, and the impact of widespread Fourth Amendment violations.

Published On: Wednesday, November 13, 2013 | Download File

Our Melting Pot: Meeting, Eating and Growing Together

The goal of Our Melting Pot is to develop knowledge and appreciation of the diversity of nations from which our students' ancestors came. By creating his/her own Immigration cookbook, students will appreciate their ancestry and learn about how certain foods are incorporated in to life in the United States.

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