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Arizona Bullies Target Birthright Citizenship

Published on Tue, Jun 15, 2010

But the next target is not kids. It is babies. The next idea is to deny birth certificates to children born here to illegal immigrant parents. It’s not a new idea, but its one that keeps being coughed up by those who haven't found a problem they can't blame on illegal immigrants.

Call them bullies without a clue.

The Immigration Policy Center prepared a fact sheet for those who want to understand this a little better.

Published in the Arizona Republic

Dada v. Mukasey Q&A: Preliminary Analysis and Approaches to Consider

In Dada v. Mukasey, the Supreme Court protected the right to file a motion to reopen by holding that voluntary departure recipients are permitted to unilaterally withdraw their voluntary departure request before the expiration of the voluntary departure period. This Q&A offers preliminary analysis about the potential impact of Dada v. Mukasey on individuals’ cases and offers suggestions about immediate steps to take.

Published On: Tuesday, June 17, 2008 | Download File

Jose Antonio Vargas

Year Released: 2012

Nebraska Town: Is Illegal Immigration Crackdown Worth The Cost?

Published on Tue, Jul 27, 2010

Others say the Fremont City Council is right to look at the costs associated with enacting any kind of legislation.

“Good public policy involves weighing all the costs and benefits of enacting legislation," says Mary Giovagnoli of the American Immigration Council's Immigration Policy Center. "While Fremont may be motivated in this case to suspend the law because of the fear of litigation costs, there are numerous other costs to consider," she says, "including the loss of revenue to the town when people leave, stop supporting local businesses and paying taxes, as well as the psychological impact when a town goes down the road of driving people away."

Published in the Christian Science Monitor

Prosecutorial Discretion Requests Under the Johnson Enforcement Priorities Memorandum

This Practice Advisory, co-authored by the American Immigration Council and AILA, provides a close reading of Secretary Johnson’s November 20, 2014 memorandum on Policies for the Apprehension, Detention and Removal of Undocumented Immigrants. It briefly discusses DHS’s new three-tiered enforcement prioritization scheme, the various exceptions to the enumerated priorities, use of detention, and steps the agency is taking to implement the new policies. This Practice Advisory has been updated to include information about guidance issued on April 6, 2015 to immigration judges and attorneys with ICE’s Office of the Principal Legal Advisor regarding implementation of Secretary Johnson’s memorandum.

Published On: Tuesday, May 5, 2015 | Download File

Freedom, Fairness, & Equality

In this guided presentation, student will wrestle with the essential question: how deep is our commitment to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness?  They will learn about five historical examples of restrictive immigration law and policy and apply essential teachings of Dr. King in order to understand the value of youth civic engagement.
Read more...

Year Released: 2015

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Estimate: 1 US kid in 15 born to an illegal immigrant

Published on Thu, Aug 12, 2010

The Immigration Policy Center, an immigrant-rights organization in Washington, D.C., said in a news release that without data on children with two illegal parents, the report "offers no real clarity."

Whether the change would strip citizenship from one baby or 1 million, it's a mean-spirited plan that wouldn't help the country with its illegal-immigration issues, said Michele Waslin, senior policy analyst with the Immigration Policy Center. Waslin also said calling these children "anchor babies" is both offensive and inaccurate.

Published in the Arizona Daily Star

Prosecutorial Discretion

Under the President’s Immigration Accountability Executive Action, prosecutorial discretion will be exercised differently. In addition to the announcement of a new DACA-like deferred action program for the parents of U.S. citizens and lawful permanent residents, the Immigration Accountability Executive Action expands the existing DACA program and sets forth new enforcement priorities that will bind ICE, USCIS and CBP. For more information on these changes, please see the American Immigration Council’s guide to the President’s Immigration Accountability Executive Action here.

The American Immigration Council is currently developing new resources on prosecutorial discretion

 

Prosecutorial discretion is the authority of a law enforcement agency or officer to decide whether to enforce the law in a particular case. In the immigration context, favorable exercises of prosecutorial discretion include grants of deferred action, stays of removal, and decisions to cancel or not issue a Notice to Appear (NTA). Since 2000, the legacy Immigration and Naturalization Service and current DHS agencies have issued more than a dozen guidance memoranda addressing prosecutorial discretion. The LAC has issued a practice advisory suggesting ways that immigration attorneys can influence the favorable exercise of prosecutorial discretion by DHS, and filed an amicus brief relating to the exercise of prosecutorial discretion in a Ninth Circuit case.Read more...

Why an immigration amnesty could benefit British workers

Published on Fri, Oct 08, 2010

Indeed, there is conclusive evidence that granting amnesty to illegal immigrants enables them to boost their income, reducing socio-economic disparities. As part of the last attempt at immigration reform 25 years ago, the United States granted amnesty to nearly 3 million immigrants. A study carried out last November by the American Immigration Council found that whereas their homeownership rates and skills levels lagged those of equivalent ages who had been born in the United States, this gap had almost completely disappeared by 2006. Indeed, many of those who came to the United States in their late 20s and early 30s without the equivalent of a secondary education had improved their levels of qualifications, suggesting that they had invested time and money in remedial education.

Published in the Statesman