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Who We Are

The Community Education Center strives to promote a better understanding of immigrants and immigration by providing educational resources that inspire thoughtful dialogue, creative teaching and critical thinking.  Dedicated to the American values of fairness, social justice and respect for all people, the Center is committed to making immigration an “everybody issue.”  The Center also highlights the positive contributions immigrants have made and continue to make to American society through its programmatic work.

Staff

Claire Tesh
Senior Manager, Community Education Center 
ctesh@immcouncil.org

Sara Burnett
Education Associate, Community Education Center
sburnett@immcouncil.org

 

 

 

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"Undocumented and Unafraid"

Published on Thu, Mar 29, 2012

On March 14, Tania Chairez and Jessica Hyejin Lee walked into the Immigration and Customs Enforcement offices in downtown Philadelphia and handed over letters demanding the release of Miguel Orellana, an undocumented immigrant who has been detained for eight months at a Pennsylvania detention center. Both Chairez, a 19-year-old sophomore at the University of Pennsylvania, and Lee, a 20-year-old junior at Bryn Mawr College, were undocumented immigrants themselves, having been brought to the U.S. by their parents at ages 5 and 12, respectively. After making their demand, they exited the building, sat down in the middle of the street, and began shouting “Undocumented! Unafraid!” They were arrested after refusing to move, putting themselves at risk of deportation in the process.

With Washington unlikely to take up immigration reform any time soon, some immigrants, like activists in the Occupy and LGBT movements, are turning to more confrontational tactics. Young undocumented immigrants across the country have come out as “undocumented and unafraid” in the most conspicuous of places: in front of the Alabama Capitol; in Maricopa County, Ariz., home of Sheriff Joe Arpaio; in front of federal immigration courts; and even inside ICE offices, processing centers, and detention centers. While they sometimes have specific causes, such as Orellana’s release, they also had a larger demand: that the civil and human rights of all undocumented immigrants be recognized and respected.Read more...

Published in the Salon.com

Institute & Meetings (2011 Litigation Meeting)

Litigation Meeting Materials

Folder Materials

How do we stop states and localities from adopting and enforcing local immigration measures? (Arizona copycat bills)

Prolonged detention/detention conditions

Outline of questions for discussion in the detention small group session

1. Larger perspective discussionRead more...

The Fiscal Fallout of State Immigration Laws

Published on Thu, Jun 14, 2012

Time Magazine uses IPC numbers to explain why harsh state immigration laws are bad for the economy: Read more...

Published in the Time Magazine

Educator Workshops

The Community Education Center offers day-long Education Workshops to youth, educators and community leaders who are interested in integrating the subject of immigration into their communities, professional and educational spheres.

Each workshop features an immigration attorney who discusses the historical and contemporary aspects of immigration in the United States, an immigration activist/ author, educational experts and other expert lecturers. Workshops have been held in Washington, D.C., New York, Los Angeles, Philadelphia, Chicago, Miami and San Francisco.Read more...

Advocacy groups weigh in on 287(g) phase out

Published on Thu, Oct 18, 2012

Senior policy analyst Michele Waslin was quoted in this article ICE's 287(g) program:

"Michele Waslin, a senior policy analyst with the American Immigration Council, said the task force piece of the 287(g) agreements pertains to police officers on the street.

Waslin said the council, a non-profit that aims to educate the public about immigration and promote sensible, humane immigration policies, has always “advocated for the end of the 287(g) program.”

Waslin said that Secure Communities would still identify criminal illegal immigrants, but would probably eliminate some of the issues some people have had about 287(g).

Waslin said that there are people who worry about police officers exceeding their authority and the potential for racial profiling, civil rights violations and discrimination under the program.

“That’s where the criticism has come from, the police stopping people and asking to see papers,” she said."

Published in the Inside NOVA

Roman Totenberg

Professor Emeritus of Music at Boston University

Across the continents and the span of seven decades, violinist Roman Totenberg has been singled out by critics as an outstanding violinist, a sensitive musician and a brilliant teacher. Roman Totenberg was born in Poland in 1911 and made his debut with the Warsaw Philharmonic when he was 11 years old. Soon after his Berlin debut, he was performing with every major European orchestra, making recordings and eventually playing with major orchestras in the United States, at the White House and the Library of Congress. His work as a chamber music performer was widely acclaimed when he played regularly with the New Friends of Music in New York and in 1940 when he became Director of live chamber music concerts for New York radio station WQXR. As a young artist he toured South America with Arthur Rubinstein and met composer Darius Milhaud after Totenberg's Paris debut which Milhaud had reviewed. More than two decades later, Totenberg, with the composer conducting, would play a premiere performance of Milhaud's 2nd Violin Concerto in Aspen, Colorado and in Berlin with the Berlin Philharmonic. These concerts were among a number of first performances of composers' works that Totenberg would play over the years.

Totenberg continues performing as a soloist with orchestra in recital and in chamber music concerts. As his reputation for concert performances has grown, so too has his reputation for fine teaching and musical expertise. In 1983, he was named Artist Teacher of the Year by the American String Teachers Association. Currently teaching at Boston University, he headed the String Department there from 1961 to 1978. He taught at the Mannes School of Music in New York, headed the string department of the Peabody Conservatory of Music, Baltimore, and the Longy School of Music which he was the Director from 1978 to 1985.Read more...

IPC State Fact Sheets Featured in Huffington Post

Published on Mon, Jul 22, 2013

A recent article in the Huffington Post, "Greeley Immigration Reform Rally Focuses On U.S. House Of Representatives, Rep. Cory Gardner," mentioned one of the recent IPC State-by-State Fact Sheets. 

"...More than two dozen people showed up for the event and held signs in support of immigration reform.

'The Immigration Policy Center estimates that Colorado will lose an estimated $8 billion in economic activity if all unauthorized immigrants were to be deported,' Young said. 'When people work for less than the going wages, it undercuts employment and saps the paychecks of every hard working family.'

Published in the Huffington Post

Jennifer Lynch, Esq.

Jennifer Lynch, Esq. is a staff attorney with the Electronic Frontier Foundation and works on open government, transparency and privacy issues as part of EFF’s FOIA Litigation for Accountable Government (FLAG) Project. In addition to government transparency, Jennifer has written and spoken frequently on government surveillance programs, intelligence community misconduct, and biometrics collection. Prior to joining EFF, Jennifer was the Clinical Teaching Fellow with the Samuelson Law, Technology & Public Policy Clinic at UC Berkeley School of Law. She has published academically on identity theft and phishing attacks and sovereign immunity in civil rights cases.

AIC's Benjamin Johnson Featured in Fox News Latino

Published on Tue, Apr 01, 2014

Ben Johnson, the Executive Director of the American Immigration Council, was recently featured in a Fox News Latino article titled "Think Tank Says DHS Releases Criminal Immigrants, But Critics Counter Numbers Are Skewed". 

Johnson highlighted the misleading methodology used in a recent publication from the Center for Immigration Studies that stated 68,000 undocumented immigrants with criminal records were released from detention instead of being deported.

"Benjamin Johnson, Executive Director of the American Immigration Council, said that the people released were not all actually 'set free.'

'Being released from ICE custody often means being issued a notice to appear in court, released with an ankle bracelet or released under an order of supervision,' he said. 'These details were conveniently left out of the CIS analysis.'

Also, Johnson said, 'the 195,000 [of people charged] is completely misleading. Sadly, it isn’t necessary to be 'charged' by ICE in order to be removed from the country.'

He further explained: 'For instance, this 'charged' number does not include the 160,000 people who were removed based on the reinstatement of a prior removal or the 23,000 that were voluntarily returned to their country of birth,” he said.

'And, the number likely does not include the additional 101,000 that were removed from the U.S. based on an expedited removal order, where they were summarily removed without ever having a chance to take their case before a judge or receive any meaningful due process.'"

Published in the Fox News Latino