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Prospective Applicant FAQs:
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1. What occupational categories can the American Immigration Council sponsor?
The American Immigration Council is designated by the U.S. Department of State to sponsor J-1 intern and trainee programs in the following occupational areas:

• Arts and Culture
• Information Media and Communications
• Management, Business, Commerce and Finance
• Public Administration and Law
• Social Sciences, Library Science, Non-clinical Counseling, Social Services
• The Sciences, Engineering, Architecture, Mathematics and Industrial Occupations
• Tourism

2. How long can the internship or training program be?
Intern programs have a maximum duration of 12 months. Trainee programs have a maximum duration of 18 months.

3. What are the minimum qualifications for an international intern?
Potential J-1 interns must be able to document and/or demonstrate the following to meet basic eligibility requirements:

• Sufficient English language fluency (to be determined by American Immigration Council staff)
• Current enrollment at a post-secondary, degree-granting academic program outside of the United States or
• Graduation within the past 12 months from such post-secondary academic program outside of the United StatesRead more...

Rounding up reactions to the Supreme Court hearing on Arizona immigration crackdown

Published on Thu, Apr 26, 2012

The Supreme Court of the United States, which heard arguments in the lawsuit against Arizona’s immigration enforcement law Wednesday, will not issue its decision until June, but opponents and supporters continue to argue the merits of the state’s crackdown.

The court heard arguments on the legality of only four provisions contained in the Arizona law, known as S.B. 1070. Analysts on both side of this issue say the court’s eventual decision will affect the future of immigration laws across the U.S. Read more...

Published in the The Florida Independent

Green Card Stories

The immigration debate is boiling over. Americans are losing the ability to understand and talk to one another about immigration. The new Arizona immigration law makes it clear that we must find a way to connect on a human level.

Green Card Stories does just that. The book depicts 50 recent immigrants with permanent residence or citizenship in dramatic narratives of about 1,000 words each, accompanied by artistic photos. Rather than couching immigration in terms of economics or politics, these stories appeal to the heart.

Each story is as old as the foundation of this immigrant nation, but also reflects the global trends and conflicts of the 21st century: the aspiring dentist who fled war-torn Sudan with just three T-shirts and a pair of shoes; the Caribbean-born orthopedic surgeon facing deportation; the Iraqi bodyguard for U.S. troops blinded by a car bomb; a former Mexican farm worker and school dropout turned high school principal. Arriving from all corners of the globe, coming for work, love, to study or escape persecution, they all share a steely resourcefulness and a fierce love for America. Green Card Stories tells the true story of our nation: E pluribus unum--out of many, one.Read more...

65,000 Bay Area immigrants could benefit from deportation policy, study states

Published on Sun, Aug 05, 2012

IPC's own Wendy Sefsaf was quoted in a Mercury News article about DREAMers living in the Bay Area.  In that area alone, there are about 65,000 immigrants who could benefit from Obama's new deportation policy coming into effect August 15, 2012.  But the Bay Area isn't the only region of the country with hopeful DREAMers:  Read more...

Published in the Mercury News

D. Jean Wu

Ms. D. Jean Wu grew up in Taiwan and came to the United States at the age of fourteen. She earned her undergraduate degree in marketing at the University of Virginia and her master's degree in information science at George Mason University. She also attended business executive programs at the Amos Tuck School of Business Administration at Dartmouth College.

Ms. Wu is the founder of Integrated Management Services, Inc. (IMSI). The company was established to provide solutions with an emphasis on information security and infrastructure security.

Ms. Wu serves on the Board of Visitors of the George Mason University, the Board of Trustees of the George Mason Foundation and the Board of Directors of the Virginia Hospital Center.

Ms. Wu is a long-standing supporter of charitable and educational organizations in the Washington D.C. Metropolitan area, including the Close Up Foundation, Heads Up, Boys and Girls Clubs of Greater Washington, and the Best Friends Foundation.

Return to all Honorees

AIC Executive Director Ben Johnson in the New York Times

Published on Thu, Apr 04, 2013

The AIC's Executive Director, Ben Johnson, was quoted in the New York Times on Thursday.  The article, focusing on the pathway to citizenship expected to be included in the upcoming immigration bill, called on Johnson's expertise on how the process is expected to work:

“There is broad recognition that these folks will have to go through a process of atonement,” said Benjamin E. Johnson, executive director of the American Immigration Council, a group in Washington that works to build support for immigration. “But ultimately at the end of the process they would become full-fledged members of our society through American citizenship.”

Published in the New York Times

Maria Blanco

Maria Blanco serves as the Executive Director for the Chief Justice Earl Warren Institute at Berkeley Law, University of California. She served as executive director of the Lawyers' Committee for Civil Rights of the San Francisco Bay Area. She brings more than 20 years of experience as a litigator and advocate for immigrant rights, women's rights and racial justice. Blanco is also the co‐chair of the California Coalition for Civil Rights, a group dedicated to building a progressive national agenda for civil and human rights.

IPC Report Featured in VOXXI

Published on Wed, Sep 04, 2013

A recent article on VOXXI featured a recent Special Report created by IPC Fellow Rob Paral, entitled, "Stepping Up:  The Impact of the Newest Immigrant, Latino, and Asian Voters."

The report, which details the future changes the U.S. Congress can expect in terms of voter demographics, was the central focus of the article: 

"The newly released study shows that the electoral composition in congressional districts is on track to change as more naturalized U.S. citizens and young Latinos and Asians — many of whom support immigration reform — become eligible to vote in the next few years.

“Representatives contemplating their eventual vote on immigration reform need to weigh the numerous policy arguments in favor of reform and make an informed decision, but they must also understand the shifting demographic dimensions of their districts,” stated Rob Paral, the author of the study."

Published in the VOXXI

Dowell Myers, Ph.D.

Dowell Myers, Ph.D. is Professor of Urban Planning and Demography in the School of Policy, Planning, and Development, and director of the Population Dynamics Research Group, at the University of Southern California. This report is drawn from his new book, Immigrants and Boomers: Forging a New Social Contract for the Future of America (Russell Sage Foundation, 2007).

 

NBC Highlights Council Report on DACA Recipient Gains

Published on Mon, Jun 16, 2014

The Immigration Policy Center's report "Two Years and Counting: Assessing the Growing Power of DACA" was cited in the NBC article "White House To Honor DACA Recipients As Champions of Change." The data from this report examines the gains made by DACA recipients over the two year since the program was announced.

"The Obama Administration issued deferred deportation as an executive order two years ago. Since that time tens of thousands of undocumented young immigrants known as DREAMers have applied and just recently became eligible to renew their two-year deportation deferments.

study released Monday by Harvard researchers Roberto Gonzálesand Angie M. Bautista-Chavez for the American Immigration Council found almost 60 percent of deferred deportation (DACA) recipients surveyed had been able to obtain new jobs, 45 percent had increased their earnings, and almost six-in-ten had obtained driver's licenses, broadening education and employment options."

Published in the NBC