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Supreme Court Case involving Arizona: A Resource Guide

IPC Cited in Washington Post

Published on Wed, Feb 20, 2013

An IPC report was cited in a recent article in the Washington Post on the Obama administrations push to give judges more leeway in deciding who can be deported:

"Under current law, non-citizen immigrants convicted of what’s known as an “aggravated felony” face automatic penalties that make it far harder for them to be spared from deportation. While the term suggests a crime of a serious and violent nature, the definition of an “aggravated felony” has been expanded over the years, to the point where it includes crimes that are neither “aggravated” nor “felonies.” Obama’s draft immigration bill would narrow the definition of an aggravated felony by giving immigration judges greater discretion to grant leniency to individual immigrants convicted of minor offenses.

Originally, only a small handful of serious crimes were classified as “aggravated felonies” in immigration law, but the definition was expanded in 1996 to encompass a host of other more minor offenses. “As initially enacted in 1988, the term ‘aggravated felony’ referred only to murder, federal drug trafficking, and illicit trafficking of certain firearms and destructive devices,” explains a brief from the Immigration Policy Center, an immigration advocacy group. “Today, the definition of ‘aggravated felony’ covers more than thirty types of offenses, including simple battery, theft, filing a false tax return, and failing to appear in court.”"

Published in the Washington Post

David Bartlett, Ph.D.

David Bartlett, Ph.D., who has a Ph.D. in political science from the University of California, San Diego, is president of the Global Economics Company in Minneapolis, Minnesota, and Adjunct Professor of Strategic Management and Organization at the Carlson School of Management, University of Minnesota. His book, The Political Economy of Dual Transformations: Market Reform and Democratization, won the 1998 Hewett Prize from the American Association for the Advancement of Slavic Studies.Read more...

Brookings Report on DACA Cites IPC

Published on Wed, Aug 14, 2013

In their recent report, "Immigration Facts:  Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals," the Brookings Institution cited the IPC's estimate of the number of potentially eligible DACA Recipients.

"Estimates of the potentially eligible population calculated by the Immigration Policy Center (IPC) using age, country of birth, educational attainment and enrollment, and year of entry to the United States show approximately 936,000 immigrants were immediately eligible at the time of the announcement of the program. Eligibility criteria such as continuous residence and criminal history are much harder to approximate."

Published in the Brookings Institution

Stewart J. Lawrence

Stewart J. Lawrence is a veteran news journalist and public policy analyst who writes frequently on immigration and Latino affairs. In recent years, his commentaries have appeared in The Los Angeles Times, Christian Science Monitor, Politico, the Guardian, and The World and I. He is also founder and managing director of Puentes & Associates, Inc., a bilingual survey research and communications firm.

 

AIC Executive Director Benjamin Johnson Quoted in New Republic

Published on Thu, Apr 17, 2014

AIC Executive Director Benjamin Johnson was recently quoted in the New Republic article "Who's the Real Deporter-In-Chief: Bush or Obama?" Johnson emphasized the need to not only review deportation numbers but the results of current enforcement policies.

I don’t know why we’re having a conversation about the numbers—the question is, what are the results?” said Benjamin Johnson of the American Immigration Council. “As somebody who cares about immigration policy, it’s a weird and unfortunate construct. I think the people calling him deporter-in-chief are doing it because he’s punishing them through the immigration system.”

Published in the New Republic

911 FOIA: Response from CRCL

Full Response from DHS Office for Civil Rights and Civil Liberties

Cover letter dated August 22, 2012 from Fernando Pineiro Jr., FOIA Officer, Office for Civil Rights and Civil Liberties, to Melissa Crow, Director, Legal Action Center, indicating that 70 pages of records were releasable in full and 23 pages were releasable with redactions under 5 U.S.C. § 552(b)(5) and (b)(6).

Pages 1-13:  DHS internal tracking records regarding incidents documented in OneAmerica report (see below).

Pages 14-22:  Partially redacted internal DHS e-mails about how the OneAmerica report came to CRCL’s attention.

Pages 23- 86:  OneAmerica, The Growing Human Rights Crisis Along Washington’s Northern Border (April 2012).

Pages 87-91:  Partially redacted internal e-mails dated July 2011 from Margo Schlanger, DHS Officer for Civil Rights and Civil Liberties, to Ronald Vitiello, Deputy Chief, Border Patrol, forwarding June 2011 correspondence from Jorge Baron of NWIRP about specific law enforcement requests for Border Patrol interpretation assistance that apparently triggered enforcement activities, and requesting update on CBP’s written guidance.  Two e-mails, which were completely redacted, indicate that they were “Referred to CBP for Direct Reply to Requester.”Read more...

Immigrants Integral to Social Security's Future

Released on Wed, May 13, 2009

Reports released by the Social Security and Medicare Boards of Trustees this week have re-focused public attention on the deteriorating financial condition of the nation’s main health and retirement programs. These reports underscore not only the severity of the current recession, but also the demographic crisis confronting the nation as the native-born population ages. The coming wave of retiring Baby Boomers reminds us of the increasingly important role that immigrants play in the U.S. economy as taxpayers, workers, consumers, and homebuyers.

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IPC Statement on Heritage Foundation Voter Fraud Report

Released on Mon, Jun 30, 2008

Lack of evidence is no obstacle for the Heritage Foundation, which on July 10 issued a rambling memorandum claiming that an unknowable yet large number of non-citizens are voting illegally and subverting the electoral process. Rigorous research has shown that voter fraud in the U.S. is almost non-existent and that most allegations of voter fraud by non-citizens stem from faulty records, partisan politics, and common-place error.

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