Skip to Content

Programs:

Legalization

Tribute Donations

Remember those people who are or who have influenced your life by paying tribute to them.  A tribute donation to the American Immigration Council provides a meaningful way to remember or recognize those who have made a significant impact on you, your family or your colleagues.

A tribute donation can be made in honor or in memory of someone.  For each tribute, we will notify the honored individual or family of your special gift, keeping the amount confidential. 

You can make a tribute donation online (be sure to fill out “In Honor or In Memory” portion of the form and complete the dedication information) or by completing this form and mailing it to:

 

 American Immigration Council
c/o Megan Hess
1333 G Street, NW
Suite 200
Washington, DC  20005

 

Or you may fax the form to the attention of Megan Hess at (202) 742-5619.

If you have any questions at all regarding giving a contribution to the American Immigration Council, please contact Megan Hess at (202)507-7517 or mhess@immcouncil.org.

Letter to the Editor: Where Arizona’s immigration law is flawed

Published on Sun, Apr 29, 2012

Despite the Supreme Court justices’ apparent skepticism [“Justices receptive to parts of Arizona’s immigration law,” front page, April 26], the immigration status checks required by Arizona’s law subvert federal enforcement priorities and procedures. Section 2(B) requires Arizona police to verify the immigration status of all individuals arrested. This will result in thousands of additional verification requests to the federal government every year, significantly delay response times and divert scarce enforcement resources away from high-priority targets.

Section 2(B) also requires that, in the event of a lawful stop or an investigative detention, police check immigration status only if they have “reasonable suspicion” an individual is unlawfully present. Given the cursory nature of such stops, the complexities of federal immigration law and minimal guidance from the state law, police — under threat of civil damages — will be forced to rely on impermissible criteria such as race to make these determinations.

Such an arbitrary and unjust process contradicts the comprehensive enforcement scheme embodied in federal immigration law.

Melissa Crow, North Potomac

Published in the The Washington Post

J-1 Trainees and Interns

RESOURCES FOR J-1 TRAINEES AND INTERNS

The American Immigration Council is designated by the U.S. Department of State to sponsor J-1 intern and trainee programs. Intern programs have a maximum duration of 12 months. Trainee programs have a maximum duration of 18 months. Potential J-1 interns must be enrolled in a post-secondary, degree-granting academic program located outside of the United States or graduated within the past 12 months from such post-secondary academic program outside of the United States. Potential J-1 trainees must hold a post-secondary degree related to the field of the training and one (1) year of related work experience, both of which were gained outside of the United States, or have five (5) years of related work experience gained outside of the United States.

Application Checklist - Information RequirementsRead more...

DHS Unveils Guidance for Deferred Action for Qualfied Young Illegal Aliens

Published on Mon, Aug 06, 2012

Homeland Security Today cited the IPC's study, "Who And Where the DREAMers Are," in an in-depth article describing the new criteria surrounding Obama's deferred action plan:

Read more...

Published in the Homeland Security Today

Emmanuel Irono

Emmanuel O. Irono came to the United States as a foreign exchange student and planned to return to Nigeria after college to work for his father's construction company. But when both of his parents died within two years, he decided against returning and began paying his tuition by working as a school janitor.

After graduating, Mr. Irono took a job working as a budget analyst for a federal contractor. However, he wanted to start his own firm, and he bought out a small struggling janitorial service company's supplies for $10,000 and turned it into $14 million profit generator. He renamed the company Motir, in honor of his parents - Memory of Theresa Irono Romonus (MOTIR).

With an exceptional track record in senior level management and administration, Mr. Irono has grown Motir Inc. from one division of custodial services to a full scale management consulting company with divisions for Construction and Environmental Services, Facilities Management and Medical Staffing.

Never forgetting his roots, the Nigerian born Irono has traveled all over the world and has created a company of diversity that continues to give back to his homeland through his non profit organization TIS (To Inspire Strong) African Children Fund. TIS feeds, educates and provides medical treatment for the children of Africa. Whether feeding the hungry and abandoned, supplying educational tools for rural area school children, or implementing an AIDS Awareness Program, Mr. Irono is taking local action and reaching global heights.

As Chief Executive Officer, Mr. Irono has served on the Board of Directors of major organizations, while continuing to direct all aspects of Motir's operational policies, objectives, and initiatives responsible for the attainment of both short and long term goals.Read more...

The IPC Cited in the Guardian

Published on Wed, Apr 17, 2013

The IPC was cited in an article discussing Florida Senator Marco Rubio's attempts to promote the new Senate "Group of Eight" immigration bill.  Here's an except:

"'Right now nobody benefits from the status quo,' Rubio told Univision's Jorge Ramos in an interview in Spanish. 'The only people who benefit right now are the criminals abusing the people who cross [the border] and the employers who abuse their workers by paying their workers less.'

Rubio is right but he has to make a stronger case. He should explain that immigrants are not a drain but a net benefit for the United States, if there is a pathway to green cards and citizenship for the 11 million undocumented living in the United States.

What Rubio didn't detail is how the undocumented contribute to the economy by paying taxes. If they are given legal residency and citizenship, they will be able to contribute more over time. According to the Immigration Policy Center, households headed by undocumented immigrants paid a combined $11.2bn in state and local taxes in 2010."

Published in the Guardian

Roberto G. Gonzales Ph.D.

Roberto G. Gonzales Ph.D. is an Assistant Professor at the University Of Washington School Of Social Work. He earned his Ph.D. in the department of sociology at the University of California. His research focuses on the ways in which legal and educational institutions shape the everyday experiences and the transitions to adulthood of poor, minority, and immigrant youth. Current projects include a four and a half year study of undocumented immigrant young adults in Los Angeles, a companion study in Seattle, and comparative projects on immigrant youth in the U.S. and Europe. Gonzales is the author of When Do Papers Matter? An Institutional Analysis of Undocumented Life in the United States (forthcoming), Young Lives on Hold: The College Dreams of Undocumented Students and Why Integration Matters: Undocumented Immigrant Youth and Making a Case for Moving Beyond Enforcement and his work appears in numerous publications.Read more...

IPC Senior Fellow Rob Paral Published in Houston Chronicle

Published on Wed, Sep 11, 2013

Rob Paral, a Senior Fellow at the Immigration Policy Center and the author of our recently published Special Report, "Stepping Up:  The Impact of the Newest Immigrant, Asian, and Latino Voters," made the case in the Houston Chronicle that the long-term demographic shift in many Republican and Democratic districts makes immigration reform even more of an urgent priority:

"A new analysis of immigration trends and demographic composition of U.S. House districts shows that many Republican congressional districts have emerging electorates that care deeply about immigration reform.

"Many Republican representatives will see their constituency profiles evolve in the coming years. Asian and Latino youth and newly naturalized U.S. citizens will make up 34 percent of newly eligible voters in 55 Republican-held congressional districts."

Published in the Houston Chronicle

Robert L. Smith

Robert L. Smith is a veteran journalist who covers international cultures and immigration issues for the Cleveland Plain Dealer, Ohio’s largest newspaper. Bob grew up in Cleveland, where he lives with his wife, Cleveland Orchestra violinist Chul‐In Park, and their two children, Jae, 5, and Sun‐Hee, 3. He has written extensively about immigration issues and has interviewed people at all points of the immigrant experience, from undocumented field workers to hugely successful entrepreneurs.

LAC's Deputy Legal Director Beth Werlin Discusses Lawsuit on Behalf of Children Facing Deportation

Published on Fri, Jul 11, 2014

Beth Werlin, Deputy Legal Director for the American Immigration Council, discusses the recent nationwide class-action lawsuit on behalf of thousands of children who are challenging the federal government's failure to provide them with legal representation as it carries out deportation hearings against them with EbruNews.

Watch the clip below.


Published in the EbruNews